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newbie-user
October 20th, 2011, 05:38 PM
For me, I prefer Ubuntu because out of the box, it has all the utilities, software, etc. that I need to be productive. With Windows, I have to go install this and that and some other things before I can get to the same level of productivity that Ubuntu provides even with just a fresh install.

peyre
October 21st, 2011, 03:30 AM
You do not have "Billy" on your machine is the biggest advantage of using linux. Until the people who make linux products figure out a good way to help noobs with installation and other problems sadly linux will not become popular with the masses. Also as you mentioned, you can not play most games with linux products.

I'm not worried so much about Bill as I am about Steve (Ballmer).

Sarai
October 22nd, 2011, 01:41 PM
Because it works!\\:D/

HoochShepherd
October 23rd, 2011, 03:14 AM
So I have a PC. PC all the way. Less money for more computer!
I triple boot with Windows 7, Lion, and Ubuntu.

Honestly, OSX is way to kiddie proof. It's virtually impossible to actually do anything you want. They've repeatedly burned bridges with game companies, making them neither a gaming platform or one I use for utility.

Ubuntu is great!! I love it! But... The market is way to focused on the big guys, so gaming is not really an option. And it also poses problems with things like Virtu. Otherwise I would be a Linux fanboy.

Windows just really has the mainstream support, and while there are loads of faults there are more developers there to pick up the slack. For watching movies I need to be in windows so I can use my igpu, for gaming I need to be there as that's really where the games are. Everything else though is Ubuntu...

Although I will say, as sandboxed as OSX is.. It is awfully pretty and kinda fun at times.

Dy1anW
October 23rd, 2011, 03:20 PM
Stability mostly.

I've had Ubuntu on my own personal ISP-style server, laptop and desktop, and haven't had any major issues to date (became a convert since 8.04 from Mandrake). I've even had uptimes for over a quarter (year) without any issues, especially involving memory. In fact pretty much the only reason why I kept Windows on my desktop was because of work related programs that don't work well under Wine, but all that changed after the latest SP1 update for Windows 7, where I lost all my data. That was fun...

I also find Ubuntu easier to use than Windows to some extent. Something goes wrong? Not a problem! There's usually an easy(-ish) fix or that, or someone on forums will know what to do :p but when something goes wrong in Windows, it REALLY goes wrong.

Plus, Ubuntu has a more customisable/extensible feel to it (if that even makes any sense), and I don't feel limited by the OS... much.

freshminted
October 24th, 2011, 09:01 AM
Windows 7 does have one function I like: the interface between my printers. For EVERYTHING else, give me Linux. Especially as I have tried MS Win7 with the MS Bluetooth Mouse on a Bluetooth enable laptop. Tried for more than 20 hours, with help from HP to make it work. Then went to MS who promised a response in 'one working day'. I am still waiting after several 'working days'. My verdict? Not only does Windows stink, but everything to do with the company does too. But then, look at the Chief Executive - surely the original model for Miss Piggy? Perhaps the most arrogant looking man to grace the internet? Ubuntu 11.04 is almost as easy to install, set up and run as any Windows configuration. A slight tweak, and it could so easily replace Windows throughout every government department (in UK) solving a good 15% of their overheads.....

MagicThinker
October 25th, 2011, 01:31 PM
G'day,

The only time I use Windows is for Business. As most Businesses use Windows.
I dare not depart from Linux due to the freedom to develop and to stop a malfunctioning or crashed program instantly, try that on Windows 7 running nativly it can take a few minutes to terminate the crashed program. I only use Windows in a virtual setup for Business as most people I work with are so humdrum on Windows and no no other OS. Or for that freedom to do what you like with your OS to improve it or to break it. Which ever comes first.

Most people just use what they are given on the computer and dare not venture out with another OS let alone UBUNTU.

Cheers.

cirelosborn
October 27th, 2011, 04:12 PM
Ubuntu is the graduate level of computing, whereas windows is still in grade school stages. If you want to do social networking and chat then windows will work with minimal crashing. If you want to be productive and perform high end editing then use mac. But, if you want the complete package, with cross platform functionality, faster and easy computing, linux is the ultimate os.

Dragonbite
October 27th, 2011, 04:25 PM
Ubuntu is the graduate level of computing, whereas windows is still in grade school stages. If you want to do social networking and chat then windows will work with minimal crashing. If you want to be productive and perform high end editing then use mac. But, if you want the complete package, with cross platform functionality, faster and easy computing, linux is the ultimate os.

My observations are opposite:
If you want to do basic stuff like email, web, social networks, etc. without crashing, networking issues, etc., use Linux.
If you want to do high-end editing on a stable system, use a Mac ( I guess, I haven't touched one in years upon years).
If you want a larger collection of packages to do a task (open source and proprietary) and to use software with functionality, compatibility and capabilities, use Windows.

This doesn't mean Linux is not capable of higher-end editing and development, but they are limited to some degree by not being able to run proprietary products (Visual Studio, Acrobat Pro, Photoshop, MS Office) while Windows can run these AND run a number of popular open source programs (Eclipse, Gimp, LibreOffice).

Plus, open source applications do fewer jobs but does them well while proprietary applications usually try to include more "bells and whistles".

But what Windows cannot do is run on older systems, be up-to-date and run it all "on the cheap" (little or no money paid).

beew
October 27th, 2011, 06:24 PM
It is not owned by MicroSoft.

fishandchips
October 27th, 2011, 07:28 PM
It is not owned by MicroSoft.

Whoa there fella, them's fighting words!

"pwned" by Microsoft is a prerequisite around here these days.

Gawains Green Knight
October 27th, 2011, 07:31 PM
I hate windows. When I have to use it I get annoyed. I teach and all the classrooms have windows on them. So I've installed wubi on a couple so that they are at least usable now....

BillyBoa
October 27th, 2011, 07:50 PM
The truth is that Win7 is very good. In any case I use ubuntu because I can visit any website without serious security problems. And every month I reformat my hard drive and re-install a fully working ubuntu in just 45 min. You cannot do that in Win7 because you are exhausting your licence in only a few re installations. The same with MSOffice and all licensed software installed.

beew
October 27th, 2011, 08:09 PM
The truth is that Win7 is very good. In any case I use ubuntu because I can visit any website without serious security problems. And every month I reformat my hard drive and re-install a fully working ubuntu in just 45 min. You cannot do that in Win7 because you are exhausting your licence in only a few re installations. The same with MSOffice and all licensed software installed.

Reformatting and reinstalling Ubuntu every month??

oldsoundguy
October 28th, 2011, 03:20 PM
The truth is that Win7 is very good. In any case I use ubuntu because I can visit any website without serious security problems. And every month I reformat my hard drive and re-install a fully working ubuntu in just 45 min. You cannot do that in Win7 because you are exhausting your licence in only a few re installations. The same with MSOffice and all licensed software installed.

???????? WHY?????????
I have NEVER had to re-format a Linux install.
First off, just doing an install formats the drive.
Second, and most important .. Linux is NOT Windows. The drive does not get fragmented beyond recognition. Been running Ubuntu and variants on various boxes (5 at present) since 6.04 and never had to re-install. And, since there are no .reg files to get corrupted, no need to wipe and re-install.
IF you did not know, just the act of re-booting a Linux build re-aligns the drive and every 30 or so re-boots, the drive will be put through a disc check. Does that automatically.

The PRIMARY reason I got away from using Windows as an every day and main computer is just that maintenance factor and the copious amount of time wasted updating and servicing a Windows based computer .. especially if you take it on line.

Glynnux
October 28th, 2011, 04:20 PM
I chose Ubuntu cos it's gooder..

I think all the real reasons have already been covered in the past 500+ pages.

I still keep a pc with Windows 7 for a few purchased softwares, but Ubuntu is so quick from power on to riding a wave and so much more user friendly that I would never go out of my way to start Win 7 just to check mail or surf. Same as I wouldn't spend any time with Wine to try and run Sturmovik, ROF, Reason or Cubase in Ubuntu.

Recently that means I'm running Ubuntu 95% of the time (this will vary with demand or whim).

homogenizer
November 1st, 2011, 07:35 AM
I use Ubuntu for peace of mind in my work. My production laptop (Asus A43SJ-VX335) uses Ubuntu 11.04 32-bit. My previous laptop (HP500) uses 10.04LTS. Been using linux fulltime since 7.04. Simple email, chat collaboration, openoffice/libreoffice, PDFedit, QCAD and online research.

I use windows just for games like eveonline and world of tanks.. thats it.. I have a separate desktop for gaming.

LinuxFan999
November 6th, 2011, 02:06 AM
I chose Ubuntu (and Linux in general) over Windows because it is superior to Windows. I find it faster, more stable, more secure, and in some aspects, easier to use than Windows. Linux also frees me from Microsoft and it's anti-competetive practices. I also like how Ubuntu and other Linux distros don't cost anything to download and use, but Windows costs at least 200 dollars. Linux also tends to work out-of-the-box, but Windows sometimes requires you to install addditional drivers.

Gatmasta
November 6th, 2011, 02:49 AM
Honestly I have more trouble using windows than using Ubuntu. I like how automated it is.

Goofball Jungle
November 8th, 2011, 12:42 AM
Seriously I went all in at the first installation. Had some rough times but I never relived thos microsoft times. All I need now is a UxBOX :P.

TheothersideoftheForce
November 9th, 2011, 05:56 PM
I stopped using windows after my buddy showed me how awesome ubuntu 9 was, i than bout a macbook for school work and not having to worry about performance. but i use ubuntu for freedom and fun as my home desktop. i have even set it up as a virtual machine on my mac, however i dont boot it that often. i love all the open source apps from design to music editors i find ubuntu a fresh reminder of how fun working with a computer can actually be

BenB1
November 10th, 2011, 09:21 PM
Peace of mind in a secure, stable, configurable operating system that is free. This is why I use Linux, either Ubuntu, or Debian. Back in Lucid Lynx currently because it feels more cozy for me. I was running Squeeze and somehow updated kernel, which forced the computer to load Wheezy repositories. This sort of stuff happens to me frequently. It is not the distribution's error, rather a zany loose nut user. :) I overload. Hoping to curb self this time.

boazjones
November 18th, 2011, 04:56 PM
Windows XP is nice; however, Vista and 7 appear to have difficulty operating the same way twice.

klroberts755
November 20th, 2011, 07:06 AM
I just started using Ubuntu recently myself. I setup a dual boot on my laptop with Windows 7. Currently Im in school right now tring to get my degree in Networking and my computer teacher informed us that alot of companies are moving away from Windows OS to Linux and I thought I would benefit from getting hands-on with the Ubuntu and Linix OS before it is too late. So far, I am pleased with it. Im not a gamer so that isnt a problem for me. I do like the fact that I dont have to worry about viruses or anything like that. I do believe that once I get more familiar with Ubuntu, I do believe I will switch over completely.

BobSongs
November 23rd, 2011, 02:34 AM
The question put to us in this thread is:
Basically I dont see any advantages to using linux over windows xp, Im dual booting windows and ubuntu. Ubuntu is nice and all but I dont see anything that would make me prefer it over windows.The only thing i have been using ubuntu for is web browsing playing music/movies (cant play games) which I can do better/hassle free in windows.

So what are the advantages of l using linux over xp?This is a valid question. I could answer it using analogies:


Why use a motorcycle when you have a car?
Why use a plane when you have a helicopter?
Why use X when you have Y?
Why use Windows when there are prettier Macs out there?

Notice how the question today is:


Why use Linux when there's Windows?

Instead of:


Why use Linux? It's broken, nothing works, there's no software, no one can understand it but a handful of computer geeks?

This question is essentially saying: "Linux has finally come of age. So, why you use it!?!" The answer to the question is found within the question itself. Linux is used because it's usable. We use motorcycles because they're usable. We use planes because they're usable.

I personally use GNU/Linux for the following reason:

In spite of all Microsoft has done to put Linux down: roadblocks, stalling its development, refusing to support open standards and so forth: Linux works.

But... but...


Do you ever use Windows? Yes, I still do use XP. Of the versions of Windows offered by Redmond this one's the most stable, best known, and after 10 years of tweaking -- the one that'll outshine all the others..
Is it your primary OS? No. I use it for games and for a Rosetta Stone language tutorial.
Don't you feel more "at home" in Windows than you do Linux? No. I've used Ubuntu since Breezy Badger, 2005. So Ubuntu is home now.
Don't you feel isolated since you're using such an infrequently used O/S? No. I meet people who use Ubuntu and we immediately have a common ground that opens discussion. The only "common ground" I get with Windows users are complaints.
Aren't you going to stop playing around and come back to Windows full time? If I had to lose an O/S on my PC, it would be Windows.
You can't be serious!? My neighbor let me put Ubuntu on her new HP powerhouse PC. After setting it up I gave her the mouse and said: "Have fun. Call me if you have questions." A year later I asked her: "Which do you use most now? Give me a percentage of time spent." She said: "Oh, easy. 99% of my time is in Linux, 1% to retrieve songs my brother-in-law buys on iTunes. Most of my time in Windows is spent waiting for updates to come and go."

In my mind the question is no longer "Why do you Linux?" but rather:


GNU/Linux has come of age, it's free and brings the fun back to computing. Why are you still paying Microsoft for yet another Windows license?

meee
November 23rd, 2011, 02:42 AM
there are a lot... really

a few practical ones:
no viruses, adware, spyware... whatever all that is called
you don't need to reinstall, just keep upgrading. at least debian based distros such as ubuntu
stability. it just _is_ more stable.

and once you know more about linux, you'll realise that you can tweak it as you want it, customize it to your needs.

plus you don't support an unethical monopolistic company.

my suggestions if you play games: dual boot with windows (games) and ubuntu (everything else)
go here: ubuntuguide.org

No viruses, adware, spyware on any windows machine I have owned. Everything works in windows, "plug and play", something linux has no clue on. Tweak it??? It would be easier to write code for a new OS than to get this baggage user friendly. Ya it's free. You get what you pay for.

peyre
November 24th, 2011, 01:37 AM
No viruses, adware, spyware on any windows machine I have owned. Everything works in windows, "plug and play", something linux has no clue on. Tweak it??? It would be easier to write code for a new OS than to get this baggage user friendly. Ya it's free. You get what you pay for.

No malware at all on any Windows machine you've owned? That would seem to be a first. My Windows boxes pick up malware just from surfing the Web, like everybody else's. I think there may be something going on here you're not mentioning--or haven't considered.

You're right that the "it just works" experience is one of Linux's weak points. It's improving in that regard, though, and it's much better than it used to be. Also, drivers go both ways--they're either a royal pain, or they Just Work in Ubuntu, whereas in Windows you usually have to specifically download and install a driver.

You don't always get what you pay for. I have a full-featured operating system (once I got over the learning curve) for free.

BobSongs
November 24th, 2011, 02:28 AM
No viruses, adware, spyware on any windows machine I have owned. Everything works in windows, "plug and play", something linux has no clue on. Tweak it??? It would be easier to write code for a new OS than to get this baggage user friendly. Ya it's free. You get what you pay for.No malware at all on any Windows machine you've owned? That would seem to be a first. My Windows boxes pick up malware just from surfing the Web, like everybody else's. I think there may be something going on here you're not mentioning--or haven't considered.

You're right that the "it just works" experience is one of Linux's weak points. It's improving in that regard, though, and it's much better than it used to be. Also, drivers go both ways--they're either a royal pain, or they Just Work in Ubuntu, whereas in Windows you usually have to specifically download and install a driver.

You don't always get what you pay for. I have a full-featured operating system (once I got over the learning curve) for free.It's amusing to see a pro-Windows troll here in these forums. When Linux was young and still getting its footing, many Linux users would have bitten this kind of flame bait. Today? It's just lame bait.

I bought my first copy of Red Hat Linux in a 6-CD format in 1995. I was duly impressed, far more than I was with my new copy of Windows 95. And now, 16 years later, Linux has proven itself to out-perform Windows for me. Setup is a breeze, updating a joy and adding new software a snap. It's nice to know there's a massive repository of software we can rely on.

Edit: I see why "meee" is frustrated. He posted a request for help after running into a snag and received nothing. It may have been put in an area of low traffic. I have since responded and I'm willing to help meee to get his Ubuntu up and running again.

Ultra Cronic
November 24th, 2011, 03:27 AM
This is a no brainer.
Being a network technician/sysop, for a small school I have been watching Microsoft
operating systems circling the drain for the past three new OS's that they attempted to foist on the uninformed public. The big bomb Windows Millennium started the whirl wind of digital bile and a megar attempt to make good out comes Vista :P!!.
Now windows XP was pure genius and I thought they had it together, but being as it may the registration regime was week and hackable, so free windows for everyone:confused:.
Now window7 should be called "Windoze binary dump 500" folks and here's why.
______This win7 operating system can't get through one page of binary code with out phoning home and making sure you paid your bill. Checking once checking twice every second of the way. Their lack of aggression in writing machine code gave way to drag and drop WYSIWYG Visual DLL bloat-ware infested with software police to the point of making it imposable to perform any tasks with speed and efficiency. This OS is as slow as a constipated painted turtle with arthritis. Their fear of being hacked stolen and copied has finally done them in with this one and personally I am begging the board of trustees to allow me to switch to a Linux OS campus wide and send MS packing. :-#
______Windoze 7 64 bit crashes in half the time and still takes a gazillion minutes to get to the desktop and only waiting decades for that $#@!!8-[ Hour glass to turn into a cursor.
________I probed my network with BackTrack 5 and it was pathetic what I saw windows 7 work stations doing in the background. There is at least an hour of bench hacking and reg tweaks to get win7 to download files at half the speed a window xp machine can plugged into the same cat5 drop. Speakeasy speed test gave win7 1.8 MBPS
and the then gave windows xp test a download rate of 18.5 MBPS Thats a 10x improvement. RSS / IPV6 Chimney offload and much more busy body connections phoning home to MS are eating the missing 16 MBPS in the results.
______ The corporate paranoia greed and security has finally outdone Microsoft [in the head]. And I hope I can send them packing. Go ahead and try Your Linux machine on the same network with a windows 7 dual boot and compare. You will be a believer after that. Sure Linux has PMS sometimes but at least it isn't deliberately imposed on it's users due to Payment paranoia. I officially HATE Microsoft and it's Internet Exploder for the web, that can't stay together for two weeks without causing some sort of grief after a botched auto update. Heck apple blows them away and they are a commercial OS.
_____Anybody out here trying to get Crystal reports for CAMS running on a windows 7 machine with IExploder 9 on it?
What a joke. Been a fan of MS all my life but this windows 7 takes the cake. I am done with them. Cinelerra and HotShot can do anything that adobe premier can and for no money? Kudos to NIX!!!!:guitar:
Now of all thing the biggest credit goes to speed and performance. Hit the start button, time to desktop [no hour glass bologna, 35 seconds. A modest midrange computer 4 years old 1.8 GHZ Intel Dell Latitude , 1 gig of ram, and this computer smokes the 4 minutes to the hour glass blues on a windblows operating system.
Programs POP open, No phoning home, no bloaty registration checking routines [network activity busy body-ness], and I am needing LESS blood pressure medicine to surf.
I am sure some ex worker for Microsoft would love to charm in here and act like a plain Ole Joe and say differently.

BobSongs
November 24th, 2011, 06:07 AM
This is a no brainer.
<snip>
I am sure some ex worker for Microsoft would love to charm in here and act like a plain Ole Joe and say differently.
Thanks for that personal experience, Ultra. Clearly your personal experience shows how Microsoft's terror of someone using their O/S without paying for the license has made this massive corporation chase its tail technologically.

It's interesting that Windows 3.1 had no such over-active built-in code to call home every few milliseconds for testing and confirming of legitimacy. Microsoft may think that no one has noticed their digital paranoia, but these routines affect their performance. And someone's gonna notice.

Thanks for your input. =D No one can slam Microsoft as hard and as accurately as a sys-op.

VietCanada
December 24th, 2011, 12:07 PM
Ubuntu works. It doesn't hijack my PC or try to define and control my behaviour when I use my PC.

After installation I click on Firefox and I'm on line. I select a video or audio file to play and it does. I update and carry on. No security worries at this time so everything is faster and smoother. I download you tube files and play them.

With Windows I have to answer questionnaires to use IE and their media player. Updates hijack my system, especially on 7. It's completely ridiculous. So much security software slows my system down. Not mention the hours of work maintaining that stuff. Windows media can't play very much AV that is readily available.

I installed Vista and my new camera, printer and webcam software no longer functioned. I installed my favourite CD writer Neo and Windows disabled all my optical drives. This really burned me. It reminded me that the computer I built is mine. I don't need nanny bill telling me what I can do with my PC. That's like Ford telling me where I can and can't drive my car. Perhaps it just disables the steering if I get close to Tim Hortons.

I used to see Apple as an alternative but they are totally insane control freaks.

Why do I chose Linux? Because it's free? Somewhat. Because I still own my PC that I paid for after I install it? Absolutely. Assume that means I'm doing something illegal? Welcome to the MS marketing machine. What lengths companies go to today to get control of your paycheque. Used to be mortgages, then cars, now PCs, cellphones and TVs.

rmcellig
December 24th, 2011, 01:26 PM
I have six computers. Two of them are Macs that I actually bought a few years ago. The other four were given to me by my frustrated PC friends. Two Dell desktops circa 2001plus two two HP laptops about three years old. I have various distros of Linux on the four PC's and have never looked back. I have choices and flexibility I never had with my Macs. Actually I use my Macs around 10% of the time. Imagine that! Me, a diehard Mac user since 1988.

Linux distros offer way more than Mac an Windows OS's never could.

BigSilly
December 24th, 2011, 02:05 PM
You know, the reason I think I keep returning to Ubuntu over any OS is because I think I just feel closer to how it works than any other OS. I'm not a particularly technical user, and I don't especially use Ubuntu in a technical fashion (i.e via the command line all the time), but I do feel that a lot of what is voodoo magic on Windows is made clear and transparent here on Ubuntu. It's been made clearer thanks in no small part to the Ubuntu forums and vocal contributors on the internet who demystify the workings for us, but it's also due to the very nature of Ubuntu. It is, simply put, a very clear and easy to use operating system.

How sad that people are turning on it now, just as it's beginning to get interesting. Whatever, I'm still here. :)

philinux
December 24th, 2011, 03:51 PM
You know, the reason I think I keep returning to Ubuntu over any OS is because I think I just feel closer to how it works than any other OS. I'm not a particularly technical user, and I don't especially use Ubuntu in a technical fashion (i.e via the command line all the time), but I do feel that a lot of what is voodoo magic on Windows is made clear and transparent here on Ubuntu. It's been made clearer thanks in no small part to the Ubuntu forums and vocal contributors on the internet who demystify the workings for us, but it's also due to the very nature of Ubuntu. It is, simply put, a very clear and easy to use operating system.

How sad that people are turning on it now, just as it's beginning to get interesting. Whatever, I'm still here. :)

As ever the complainers surface more than those who like ubuntu. Human nature I suppose. People who like ubuntu don't go running around forums praising it. They just like and use it.
This is very recent though.
http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2011/12/ubuntu-wins-best-distro-award-for-7th-year-in-linuxjournal-readers-poll/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+d0od+%28OMG%21+Ubuntu%21%29

gleedadswell
December 25th, 2011, 03:29 AM
1. Doesn't crash.

2. Doesn't hijack my computer every time a program insists that it needs to do an upgrade.

3. Free.

4. Customizability.

5. I can "get my hands into the operating system" much more easily in Linux than in Windows. Since I do a fair bit of programming that is quite important to me.

6. The desktop environment in Ubuntu is *hugely* better than in Windows. When I'm forced to do anything in Windows it only takes me minutes to be frustrated with how clumsy it is to switch between applications in it.

7. Faster.

8. Great user community.

9. When something is wrong I can fix it myself. If I don't know how there will be a post on a forum that tells me how to do it.

gleedadswell
December 25th, 2011, 03:58 AM
Oh, and a few more things that occurred to me:

10. I constantly need to produce PDF files. Most Windows programs either don't or do it clumsily. But almost every Linux program that produces text or graphics can export to PDF easily.

11. The Windows file manager *sucks*. Nautilus is pretty good.

12. All the scanning software I've seen in Windows is awful. In Ubuntu we've got Simple Scan which is great for everyday, easy scanning, and Sane, which can do everything you'd want, and while people complain about Sane's interface I don't mind it.

13. I often find LibreOffice better than MS office (e.g. it's better when I'm producing graphics rich documents). The one exception is the MS Office equation editor. But any time I'm producing an equation rich document I use Latex and I've found any of the Tex versions in Windows to be very inferior to what is available in Linux.

djbon2112
December 25th, 2011, 10:19 PM
I'm back on Ubuntu after a year or two on Windows 7, and here are my reasons for going back:

1. I'm becoming more staunch in my support for free software, and I'd prefer to use it at this point. I get Win7 for free, but I'd rather be FREE.

2. I can do more on Ubuntu + Wine than I could on Win7 by itself.

3. The final push, MS supports SOPA in the US, which has me, as a NetEng, immediately boycotting them.

I'm a light gamer (literally just 2 games, Skyrim and Civ5), and both are Gold or better in Wine, which is enough for me to switch.

CMXILies
December 26th, 2011, 07:05 AM
When I grew into the computer age it was much like all the other false dichotomies; Coke vs. Pepsi, Evolution vs. Creation etc.. Generally, living in a society of double-thinkers (Yes I am referencing Orwell). So when there came an alternative to the PC vs. MAC, the third choice already had my interest peaked. Thank Goodness for my dissatisfaction.

Though there were trials I revelled in the learning experience of it all. And I certainly don't miss non-free software. The Revolution won't be televised, but thanks to the net it's already here.

SAY NO TO SOPA - and say yes to internet freedom!

guyver_dio
December 26th, 2011, 07:46 AM
For more of my reasons, see this thread: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1900277

Johnny3
January 7th, 2012, 07:37 PM
I like Unity.
Thanks and God Bless Johnny3 65+++

TeamRocket1233c
January 7th, 2012, 09:03 PM
The horrific green plastic Start-button is enough for me ;P

The did away with that in Vista and 7, and they'll do away with the orb in 8.

Anyways, there's just so much stuff that Linux in general, and UNIX as well, for that matter, is better at than Windows.

TeamRocket1233c
January 7th, 2012, 09:41 PM
I used to see Apple as an alternative but they are totally insane control freaks.



Macs are expensive as heck too.

Momof9Blessings
January 11th, 2012, 01:24 AM
When I restart (and shut down)my computer - it is almost instant.... especially compared to how slow that windows takes....

techvish81
January 11th, 2012, 10:03 AM
you cannot get a ready to go system in 20 min if you go for windows.

you should have the driver cd/dvd along with the installation media to use windows, while with ubuntu u need almost nothing else, or even if you need to install any proprietary driver , it is just 2 clicks away.

if you are going to connect your pc to internet, which is , i think quite obvious in the year 2012.. ha ha, u need an antivirus software which are generally a kind of burden for the computer.

in linux you dont need it ...

windows has certainly improved much with window 7, which is much good looking, fast and reliable than previous versions, but you have to pay for it while linux is free and opensource..

matza55
January 11th, 2012, 07:40 PM
I have dualboot (W7), but only for one program which don't work in Ubuntu.
Sadly....

techvish81
January 17th, 2012, 04:20 AM
One more benefit of installing Ubuntu than windows . See the thread
http:// ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1910099

magmon
January 17th, 2012, 05:19 AM
While I have windows of any generation installed, frankly, it's a miracle I don't set my computers on fire. Linux removes this OS based rage.

peyre
January 18th, 2012, 06:58 AM
Macs are expensive as heck too.

And the OS is only supported (and legal) on Apple hardware!


When I restart (and shut down)my computer - it is almost instant.... especially compared to how slow that windows takes....

Yeah--my system starts up and shuts down a lot faster than my wife's, and she has an SSD.

Altsi
January 18th, 2012, 08:41 AM
I totally love my Ubuntu =) I've been a user for three years and a bit now. Today Exaile did not read some mp3 tags properly and i had to fiddle with some Ex Falso plugin about five minutes to get this sorted. And when doing it I just kinda noted how effortless Ubuntu is. Fast, reliable and it just works so smooth, that you take it for granted. So, thank you all the developers and community, you're a m a z i n g !! =) Buena vibra everyone =j

Chame_Wizard
January 18th, 2012, 09:38 PM
I can install newest distro version with preserving my home partition,don't need to screw up everything.

philinux
January 18th, 2012, 10:14 PM
I have dualboot (W7), but only for one program which don't work in Ubuntu.
Sadly....

Ditto Skygo.

Mlectroeagnetism
January 29th, 2012, 03:28 PM
I agree to the posts above, also I would like to mention that by using Ubuntu, you are promoting free knowledge.

Windows is nice, it may cover your needs. Especially when it comes to hard core reasearch and data analysis softwares.

However, promoting open source is a contribution to the whole World, and that is Ubuntu's advantage IMO.

Ceratopsia
February 13th, 2012, 01:54 PM
I remember starting with a Commodore 64 and a 300 Baud Hayes modem and after a couple of years buying my first 386 PC with 2 megs of ram, man was those the days. You could crawl faster then chatting on a BBS back then. After using Dos 3.1 ( I think it was called) then to windows, then onto Win 95, onward to Win 98, Trying Win ME and then chunking it in the trash about an hour after I installed it. I went to Win 2000 Server and then in 2001 I went onto Win XP Pro and then used that until 2006

When I was introduced to Linux by way of a friend. I started with Red Hat, onto Ubuntu for a while until the itch touched me again and then I went onto Mepis 3.1. After installing the newest version of Mepis for a while. Why because I was tired of the virus's, and Trojans and other really messed up things. It doesn't matter if you do all the right things and go to the right sites there is always someone that wants to put a stain on your parade with those sites that some one posted a Trojan to or wrote a script that messed up your system. So I got that itch again I have always like Ubuntu from the first day I visited the site. Yes I know you say to your self if you like Ubuntu so much then how come you used Mepis so long. Well the truth is I couldn't boot up a Ubuntu CD no matter how I tried. Now I found that I had messed up my Master Boot.

So anyway after wasting a couple of disk and two months I finally found that the MBR was messed up and that was maybe the reason why I couldn't boot another CD and to fix the boot with the Windows recovery disk and that finally fix the problem. Yes I tried downloading other programs to fix the MBR but still that didn't fix the problem. I got it to boot and here I am. I used Windows all my life and Didn't try Linux before because I had always heard that Linux was for Hackers, Crackers and other demeaning names people have for each other. After I was introduced to Linux the first time I noticed that it wasn't like Windows NO NO NO it was not like windows at all and once I got onto some of the forums I found out that all the lies that a lot had spread about Linux versions were lies. Well I am not going to ramble any longer and if you made since of what I wrote here then you understand why I switched to Ubuntu.. I am sure that they are a lot of reason I switched but I will leave that to others.

Ceratopsia

charli3
March 6th, 2012, 12:45 AM
I started with a Radio Shack color computer early 80's on bbs's and for work had to use Mac's (printing industry). Hated that I had to pay for windows3.0, 3.11, 95 and so on... I became disabled in 2003 and money got tight so i tried linux. It seemed so involved and the learning curve tough to handle at that time so I went to XP. I soon became disenchanted with Sir Gates and his crew and in 2007 started to dual boot linux and windowsxp.(mostly used xp tho) Along came Ubuntu! I was hooked mostly because of the the open source aspect, but it was not quite perfected and I began my quest to find drivers to tether my blackberry using barry etc... finally I found a way to get connected to the net via hotspot+ android and am now using ubuntu 10.10 and Xubuntu 11.04 dual boot and am able to do almost anything I could do in windows.
Now I am 64 YO and am using linux to help fend off alztimers. I still can't use my Lexmark 4350 all in one printer/scanner yet but I have another challenge to overcome. Thanks to linux and ubuntu forums for many hours of stimulating, brain teasing education!


Edit on 3/13/12- Im still trying to get VMbox to see my USB printer, i updated to xp sp3 no love yet... Did i mention im very patient

slickvguy
March 6th, 2012, 02:03 AM
I still can't use my Lexmark 4350 all in one printer/scanner yet but I have another challenge to overcome.

I did a bit of searching for you, and it seems that you're SOL as far as having a linux driver.

However, you might be able to use your printer within a virtualbox VM. Have you tried that? I have a Canon MF4150 all-in-one (which, fortunately, does have a linux driver of sorts). It's a USB windows printer. I was told it wouldn't work in virtualbox - but it does. I run an XP virtual machine, installed the Canon windows drivers, and it works perfectly. Might be a good solution for your situation.

Otherwise, I'd look for a used, linux-compatible device. They're pretty cheap.

peyre
March 6th, 2012, 05:27 AM
I did a bit of searching for you, and it seems that you're SOL as far as having a linux driver.

However, you might be able to use your printer within a virtualbox VM. Have you tried that? I have a Canon MF4150 all-in-one (which, fortunately, does have a linux driver of sorts). It's a USB windows printer. I was told it wouldn't work in virtualbox - but it does. I run an XP virtual machine, installed the Canon windows drivers, and it works perfectly. Might be a good solution for your situation.

Otherwise, I'd look for a used, linux-compatible device. They're pretty cheap.

Thanks for doing that for him, slickvguy! That's the spirit.

Charli3, you might also consider whether you need an all-in-one device. For printing, I went and bought an HP LaserJet P1006, which costs more up-front, but is much cheaper to operate than any inkjet printer (since that's where they make their money). There are good Ubuntu drivers for the HP printers.

For scanning, I have an old standalone flatbed Canon scanner that just worked when I plugged it in. For doing a lot of scanning, I also have an old Epson all-in-one that I don't use for printing--just scanning (it's much faster than the old Canon).

rg4w
March 6th, 2012, 05:51 AM
Because it's fun.

calgary27
March 6th, 2012, 10:19 AM
I`ve heard of Linux back when I was living in Europe,from the friend that was a geek trying to use suse with GPS and some other programs scanning the wireless networks while driving around in his car...it got me very curious and impressed at the same time so I asked how can I get involved...he said to me OH you don`t want to bother with that,that`s a whole lot of reading and learning...I thought to myself OK I will find out myself...I googled it and found the way to install (dual boot ( which wasn`t an easy task back then btw) and it did take a lot of reading...ever since, I had dual boot whenever I buy new comp I`d install newer version of linux. It`s been a trouble but every time I needed to make something work,install,plug,fix I managed to do so just by reading(I never opened a new thread to ask questions BTW). Right now I consider myself pretty knowledgeable about it so I installed Linux to two of my friends one completely switched the other dual boot...
I absolutely dont play any games other then G Brainy and don`t need windows at all,absolutely don`t have and/or support windows in any way and when I realized iPhone 4 won`t be supported in Linux anymore I bought iMac. There is no Windows in my house whatsoever and I hope to switch even more people here in Canada to use open source lovely Desktop environment, playful but with capability to be highly professional too <LINUX>
Cheers my friends

Dragonbite
March 6th, 2012, 02:50 PM
One thing I found I prefer Linux over Windows is with managing my wife's website.

With Windows, I can connect to her site but I have to download the file(s) I want to edit, edit them locally and then upload them.

I can do that with Linux as well, but at option I can also open the file that is on the server, edit it, and click "Save" and it is saved on the server.

Doesn't mean this is the best method, but at least it is available and it is up to ME to decide if I really want to mess things up.

Also, it means adding graphics, etc. is just a drag-and-drop away.

TeamRocket1233c
March 6th, 2012, 04:02 PM
Probably for the same reasons I'd choose any Linux distro over Windows, faster, more stable, more secure, you can do a lot of stuff in Linux that you can in Windows, and it's free.

sulyi
March 8th, 2012, 03:46 AM
Greetings,

Nice thread, I'll read some of it another time. Meanwhile I share my story.

It gives me an old-school feeling. I've started to use computers after creation of the first gui's, but I've always had a great respect for those who build the foundation of computing science and computer society. Speaking of (http://scoutshonour.com/digital/).

But that's enough I've used ms-windows a long time (it is every where try not to). On the other hand I don't see to use on windows any more and I did see a lot to abuse while I was on windows even more right now. And I think I am getting somewhere with this. I am really tired living in a kind of fear and try to protect myself. A fear not just from something bad might happen. It's not the ms trade policy and version changes that, I'm writing of, but something deeply unknown bad thing in side the mythical box (i.d. if something bad might happen, it sure happens). Now I know this, so there's no change at all. But if it does, I'll know, what and how it did, if I care. Till then I'm finding out the whys to make odds on the when. I'd like to count this as one. Other thing, if that's even possible, more relative. I think it is important to know what others do, and they're using window in high numbers. But if I have a child, hopefully I won't die alone, I'd like him or her to learn to see and use those things that ms hides from users. I'm sure if there still be ms like it is today, it'll be taught how be used.

Summary for me It came quite naturally though slow to make my choice, but after I've setup my first distro, I've not booted windows ever. There were some bump (data loss) since then, mainly because I kept using ntfs partitions. Boy that's a headache. Windows does kind of selfish about file systems. Does not like someone else touching a file on the table. This is just linux talk for ntfs-3g problem, though I did have problems using the same fat floppy with both system. So maybe this can be a third reason.

Finally, I'm thinking about, what linux could offer me, if I have other interests. I can't imagine x without starting a terminal emulator, but my reasonable side tells me that it might be done. And I love eye candy too and there is plenty, though there is always some thing that I must change, so I rather give up the extrem stuff. This not that easy though, it is so easy to get a lot of nice theme. And by now there is few program that has no linux remake, alternative and those even more easier to get than themes. But again maybe that's just because my thing with themes. So all in all I think I could be hooked up even if I my not interested in comuting the way I am.

Cheers, Ákos.

charli3
March 8th, 2012, 06:04 PM
I did a bit of searching for you, and it seems that you're SOL as far as having a linux driver.

However, you might be able to use your printer within a virtualbox VM. Have you tried that? I have a Canon MF4150 all-in-one (which, fortunately, does have a linux driver of sorts). It's a USB windows printer. I was told it wouldn't work in virtualbox - but it does. I run an XP virtual machine, installed the Canon windows drivers, and it works perfectly. Might be a good solution for your situation.

Otherwise, I'd look for a used, linux-compatible device. They're pretty cheap.

slickvguy, thank you... I'v spent the last few days installing VM and trying to get my printer to show up in usb devices. Trying to update to XP SP now. Ill let you all know how I make out.

TeamRocket1233c
March 9th, 2012, 03:42 PM
I remember starting with a Commodore 64 and a 300 Baud Hayes modem and after a couple of years buying my first 386 PC with 2 megs of ram, man was those the days. You could crawl faster then chatting on a BBS back then. After using Dos 3.1 ( I think it was called) then to windows, then onto Win 95, onward to Win 98, Trying Win ME and then chunking it in the trash about an hour after I installed it. I went to Win 2000 Server and then in 2001 I went onto Win XP Pro and then used that until 2006

When I was introduced to Linux by way of a friend. I started with Red Hat, onto Ubuntu for a while until the itch touched me again and then I went onto Mepis 3.1. After installing the newest version of Mepis for a while. Why because I was tired of the virus's, and Trojans and other really messed up things. It doesn't matter if you do all the right things and go to the right sites there is always someone that wants to put a stain on your parade with those sites that some one posted a Trojan to or wrote a script that messed up your system. So I got that itch again I have always like Ubuntu from the first day I visited the site. Yes I know you say to your self if you like Ubuntu so much then how come you used Mepis so long. Well the truth is I couldn't boot up a Ubuntu CD no matter how I tried. Now I found that I had messed up my Master Boot.

So anyway after wasting a couple of disk and two months I finally found that the MBR was messed up and that was maybe the reason why I couldn't boot another CD and to fix the boot with the Windows recovery disk and that finally fix the problem. Yes I tried downloading other programs to fix the MBR but still that didn't fix the problem. I got it to boot and here I am. I used Windows all my life and Didn't try Linux before because I had always heard that Linux was for Hackers, Crackers and other demeaning names people have for each other. After I was introduced to Linux the first time I noticed that it wasn't like Windows NO NO NO it was not like windows at all and once I got onto some of the forums I found out that all the lies that a lot had spread about Linux versions were lies. Well I am not going to ramble any longer and if you made since of what I wrote here then you understand why I switched to Ubuntu.. I am sure that they are a lot of reason I switched but I will leave that to others.

Ceratopsia

Cool! I came across it both outta curiosity, and outta necessity because I SERIOUSLY needed to get rid of Windows 98, and XP and 2000 weren't viable choices, so I went with Linux. Currently running Crunchbang 10 on my ancient PC. Should I ever get some new desktop hardware, along with a laptop and one of those netbooks that turns into a tablet, I'll run Fedora GNOME on the desktop in Fallback Mode, Crunchbang on the laptop, and Fedora GNOME on the netbook in default GNOME Shell mode.

Ubuntu will be on either touchscreen desktops or servers.

Came across BSD outta curiosity alone, the first BSD I ever tried, and my fave so far being GhostBSD.

Fave distros so far are Crunchbang, Fedora, and Ubuntu. Fave desktops are Openbox, LXDE, GNOME 2, GNOME 3 Fallback Mode, and GNOME 3 Shell. Hadn't tried Unity, Xfce, KDE, or Fluxbox yet but would like to.

No opinion on JWM or FLWM as far as desktops go, and the same with Puppy and Tiny Core as far as distros go.

And I started off originally with Windows 95 when I was in kindergarten. Now, at 19, I've used every Windows release from Win95 up to Win7, Mac OS 9 and OSX, Linux in the form of Crunchbang, Fedora, and Ubuntu, and BSD in the form of GhostBSD. I'm also a tad curious to try OpenIndiana next.

acimi66
March 10th, 2012, 07:13 PM
You had me at free...Free.....FREEEEE!

Free OS
Free updates
free software
and great forum support.

Marzata
March 10th, 2012, 10:49 PM
(Xubuntu) Linux is the most environmentally friendly OS. Thank you, community!

philinux
March 11th, 2012, 08:28 PM
Windows Millenium reached EOL.

UnknownFearNG
March 12th, 2012, 02:43 AM
I've used Ubuntu on and off for years, but have never fully switched from Windows. I guess the biggest thing holding me back was gaming, but since I pretty much do all my gaming on consoles, I've finally made the full switch to Ubuntu 11.10, and eagerly waiting the 12.04 LTS release :D

The top reasons why I chose Ubuntu over Windows was because I love using the Terminal!! I don't know why, I just love using it :D I feel like it makes me look cool ;). I also love the free updates and the amazing support on the Ubuntu forums :) You guys are amazing, and I hope, one day I am the one that helps you with your problem :).

EDIT:

I also love Ubuntu because it's a great development environment. I love opening a terminal and, if I wanted to program in Python, just type "python" and I'm there! Same with Ruby, gcc for C/C++, java for, well, Java :P etc. It's so efficient and easy!

TeamRocket1233c
March 12th, 2012, 03:12 PM
WinMe was at EOL when it was put out in the market! LMAO

synaptix
March 12th, 2012, 03:13 PM
Windows Millenium reached EOL.

Please tell me you did not use that pile of garbage.... lol

Marzata
March 12th, 2012, 03:25 PM
WinMe was at EOL when it was put out in the market! LMAO

As (by default) any other Windows.

jasonrisenburg
March 15th, 2012, 02:26 AM
You had me at free...Free.....FREEEEE!

Free OS
Free updates
free software
and great forum support.

Not to mention the only way it gets virus's is if you allow it to happen. I have never had a virus on my Ubuntu Lappy. My wife and I have had several viruses on windows. I comes down to what do you want to pay for. games and virus, or stability and free safety.

TeamRocket1233c
March 15th, 2012, 02:57 AM
Whatever you wanna use, it's your choice.

capricornday
March 15th, 2012, 07:49 AM
ubuntu is for human beings, a lot of bug, but a lot of help from each other.
every 6 months have a surprise :D
windows is so borring. :)

dave2001
March 15th, 2012, 07:38 PM
I remember starting with a Commodore 64 and a 300 Baud Hayes modem and after a couple of years buying my first 386 PC with 2 megs of ram, man was those the days. You could crawl faster then chatting on a BBS back then. After using Dos 3.1 ( I think it was called) then to windows, then onto Win 95

Ceratopsia

Heheh, those were the day indeed! Days of typing a command, and then waiting... and waiting some more.. and maybe getting a sandwich.. before the command finally completed. I remember getting my first 386 PC and thinking it was a big box of futuristic awesomeness. It even had the fancy new 3.5 inch floppy drive instead of the old huge kind!

Makes me wonder what we'll all be laughing about in another 25 years. Maybe Ubuntu will have completed its bid for world-domination by then, and we can chuckle over the demise of Microsoft and Apple. :-)

yataketumbe
March 17th, 2012, 08:59 AM
The terminal

Mingolinux
April 15th, 2012, 12:51 PM
I was running ubuntu on a live cd back in 2006 and like it. I decided to install it beside windows on my laptop. Ubuntu installed fine,but when I tried to boot into windows I got the blue screen of death. I took my new $1500 Sony laptop back to the dealer, with my extra special warranty and recovery disc that they made for me(paid extar for these) to get window reinstalled. they told me it would cost about $100 to do this. Since I was not in love with windows anyway I left with my ubuntu laptop. Years later I now run windows in my virualbox for netflixs about once a week. Microsoft should have fix my computer for free before I found out it wasn't broken. Just better

PhoenixM
May 19th, 2012, 06:43 AM
1) Free software.

With the exception of Adobe InDesign (of which there is no direct substitute to my knowledge in open source), everything needed is free and updates are available for a lifetime. Bring a college student, that is certainly inviting.

2) Faster to reboot,

Took two minutes to boot up Windows 7. Probably took 30 seconds max to reach the Ubuntu login screen.

3) Easier incident recovery.

Something go wrong? Just need to plug in a flash drive under a decent wi-fi connection and I'm back where I started within 90 minutes without it costing me a dime for software. As long as file backups are kept on my external drive, I'm a-OK.

4) Viruses

What viruses?

5) Malware

See #4

P.S.: This is from a relatively green guy. I'll probably have a treatise answering this question in a couple years,

alfu
May 19th, 2012, 05:38 PM
Here is the biggest reason for me: ever notice how Windoze keeps thrashing your hard drive? What the hell is it doing? For one thing, it is surfingf the web continuously whether you are or not.

An associate of mine had to replace his HDD twice at work, because he was leaving his computer on all the time, and the drives just wore out.

Ubuntu doesn't do that.

na5h
May 19th, 2012, 05:53 PM
the terminal

+1

zombifier25
May 21st, 2012, 09:37 AM
I'm really surprised how Ubuntu can bundle a lot of goodies like gcc, mplayer, compiz, etc. and still manages to be much lighter than Windows.

Marzata
May 21st, 2012, 09:48 AM
Xubuntu is simpler and more stylish (than Windows).

Ubun2to
May 23rd, 2012, 10:40 AM
Lots of reasons.
Free, open source, generic drivers, auto updating, tons of free programs, the interface, no worries about viruses, and having a schedule for new releases.

Sgt-Slyde
May 25th, 2012, 06:43 AM
The relative lack of built-in security flaws, the low-profile target it presents, not worrying so much about my non-computer savvy family members clicking random email attachments, the occasional challenge of "making it work," and the looks I get at work (at a rather high-level Air Force computer network center) when I talk about some of the things I can make my computer do running Linux, and its open-source concept appeals to my inner Anarchist.

roelforg
May 25th, 2012, 04:47 PM
Here's a part of my list (the full one is a few hundred entries long):
* I can make it do anything i want it to do! (linux general)
* It can become unbootable and i'll still be able to fix it w/o reinstalling/losing my files.
* If i have a problem the responses aren't limited to stuff that i'm sure breaks a license or program or os or "Try running a virus scan and if that fails, reinstall."
* It's FREE (and the legal free, not the "crack with a 90% chance of virus or some protection disabling the os" free)
* It can be anything i want.
* It can act and look exactly like i want
* It almost never crashes (i said almost because one of my screensavers has the tendency to completely freeze the system to the point that even Alt+SysRQ+R+E+I+S+U+B doesn't work and the kernel can't blink the caps-lock-led)
* I know/can easily find out exactly how/why/if any given aspect does(n't) work.
* I'm in charge of my pc! (and no phoning home like windows)
* It's mine. (Unlike windows where you actually only license using the os but the bits on your hd are actually ms property)
* I can use very old hardware with the newest/heaviest apps w/o problems.
* If hw works, it won't stop working (unlike windows where hw gets dropped all the time).
* I can break it down and build it back up by hand if i want.
* Most apps are free (and very good).
* I love the fully featured shells
* For me, any action that needs a mouse is slow
* It's a programmers dream, loads of libs with good support.
* Choice of alternative programs

I could go on like this for a while, but i think you get the point.

Dragonbite
May 25th, 2012, 05:11 PM
I could go on like this for a while, but i think you get the point.

No.. I don't :lolflag: keep going! :)

bobzr
May 25th, 2012, 05:16 PM
Freedom !:P

roelforg
May 25th, 2012, 06:49 PM
No.. I don't :lolflag: keep going! :)
Now, if i could remember on which of my 8 hdds and 4 usb-sticks did i put the list... Was is the maxtor or the western digital or maybe it was the sandisk...
Cause i'm not gonna rewrite it.

MisterGaribaldi
May 25th, 2012, 06:59 PM
Well, I don't choose Ubuntu over Windows. I choose either Linux or Mac OS X over Windows.

Linux serves no practical benefit to me personally on the desktop, so I in no way choose it over Windows. But I do choose Mac OS X over Windows on the desktop.

Linux, OTOH, serves considerable practical benefit to me on the server and imbedded devices (such as routers and smart phones), so I choose Linux over Windows in those situations.

Until the whole Unity debacle (I'm not specifically trying to takes sides here and don't mean to start a flame war) Ubuntu was largely agreed upon as being one of the best all-around Debian-based distros to use, and therefore one of the best all-around Linux distros to use. However, the whole of the Linux community -- and not just the Ubuntu community -- is divided on the Unity / Gnome 3 issue, and so the choices are not quite as obvious nor as absolutely clear-cut as they may have previously been.

The jury is still out on whether Ubuntu/Unity/Gnome3 on the smartphone will prove to be popular and successful or not. I am willing to give it the benefit of the doubt, and I'm also quite willing to check it out once such devices become commercially available.

But, getting back to the point of this thread, Ubuntu is just another Linux distro at this point, albeit a still very popular one, but it's not one I choose to use any longer.

roelforg
May 25th, 2012, 07:04 PM
Well, I don't choose Ubuntu over Windows.
So why post in a thread about why one does choose linux over windows?


I choose either Linux or Mac OS X over Windows.

Good save...



Linux serves no practical benefit to me personally on the desktop, so I in no way choose it over Windows. But I do choose Mac OS X over Windows on the desktop.

Linux, OTOH, serves considerable practical benefit to me on the server and imbedded devices (such as routers and smart phones), so I choose Linux over Windows in those situations.

Until the whole Unity debacle (I'm not specifically trying to takes sides here and don't mean to start a flame war) Ubuntu was largely agreed upon as being one of the best all-around Debian-based distros to use, and therefore one of the best all-around Linux distros to use. However, the whole of the Linux community -- and not just the Ubuntu community -- is divided on the Unity / Gnome 3 issue, and so the choices are not quite as obvious nor as absolutely clear-cut as they may have previously been.

The jury is still out on whether Ubuntu/Unity/Gnome3 on the smartphone will prove to be popular and successful or not. I am willing to give it the benefit of the doubt, and I'm also quite willing to check it out once such devices become commercially available.

<command errorcode 404: comment not found>


But, getting back to the point of this thread, Ubuntu is just another Linux distro at this point, albeit a still very popular one, but it's not one I choose to use any longer.

So don't use it, one of the reasons i've seen here a lot is that no one's forcing you to use it.

MisterGaribaldi
May 25th, 2012, 07:15 PM
Hey roelforg!

I'm simply doing my duty and providing balance in this thread.

Not everyone chooses to use any particular distro of Linux at any particular point in time.

I used to have a PC that I very successfully was able to run Ubuntu (and numerous other distros) on. In fact, I had done some upgrades to it largely to accommodate the needs of Compiz Fusion. I started having issues with Ubuntu (and, to be fair, a smattering of other distros) in the releases ultimately leading up to (but having nothing really to do with) Gnome 3 and Unity, and so I had to jockey around what distro I could use. Ultimately, I needed to make use of certain apps (in particular, Office 2007 and some of the Adobe ones as well) and it just didn't make sense to me to go through this enormous kludge to make win32 apps work.

Then, my PC died, and so I no longer have a suitable set of hardware to run any distro of Linux on.

However, I am quite happy to still be rocking Linux here in my home in the ways I mentioned above.

Those who like Unity and Gnome 3 have ample reason to choose Ubuntu over Windows. Those who don't still have ample reason to choose Linux (at large) over Windows.

roelforg
May 25th, 2012, 07:25 PM
Hey roelforg!

I'm simply doing my duty and providing balance in this thread.

Not everyone chooses to use any particular distro of Linux at any particular point in time.

I used to have a PC that I very successfully was able to run Ubuntu (and numerous other distros) on. In fact, I had done some upgrades to it largely to accommodate the needs of Compiz Fusion. I started having issues with Ubuntu (and, to be fair, a smattering of other distros) in the releases ultimately leading up to (but having nothing really to do with) Gnome 3 and Unity, and so I had to jockey around what distro I could use. Ultimately, I needed to make use of certain apps (in particular, Office 2007 and some of the Adobe ones as well) and it just didn't make sense to me to go through this enormous kludge to make win32 apps work.

Then, my PC died, and so I no longer have a suitable set of hardware to run any distro of Linux on.

However, I am quite happy to still be rocking Linux here in my home in the ways I mentioned above.

Those who like Unity and Gnome 3 have ample reason to choose Ubuntu over Windows. Those who don't still have ample reason to choose Linux (at large) over Windows.

Okay the "suitable hardware" line made me laugh (though i get your points with the other lines), i've ran linux with a good gui on systems with a p2 and 128 mb ram and selfbuild minimal ones on 16mb ram.

And yes, i choose linux above windows and mac but not because gnome (even mwm will do). But i choose it because it perfectly fits with what i want from an os, on linux i feel like the os is working with me and not the other way around.

YongQing
May 30th, 2012, 02:22 AM
I use Lubuntu on my netbook because it's a netbook.

I use Xubuntu on my desktop because I've had my credit card information stolen a couple of times so now I'm pretty paranoid. Plus, I no longer game as much so I don't really need to use Windows.

peyre
May 30th, 2012, 04:00 AM
I use Lubuntu on my netbook because it's a netbook.

I use Xubuntu on my desktop because I've had my credit card information stolen a couple of times so now I'm pretty paranoid. Plus, I no longer game as much so I don't really need to use Windows.

I do the same as you--Xubuntu on desktop, Lubuntu on laptop--though for different reasons. I like the Xubuntu interface best of all, but use Lubuntu on my 7+yo laptop.

xtremesupremacy3
June 2nd, 2012, 07:20 PM
I have used Ubuntu for years now and still choose it over Windows.

Why? Well I think that there are more than enough applications that are native for Linux that you don't need Windows ones through Wine, at least the majority of them.
And personally I find it appealing that the system is sheltered from the home folder. Only today my brother who runs Windows asked me what he could do when his computer told him something was wrong in the Windows folder, you can imagine what I thought.
Being a fairly social person I like the fact that I don't need to be on twitter or facebook to see what people have put since I get notifications. It's very customizable, and then there are the security aspects of it.
For me there is no reason for using Windows and I haven't for years (I use single boot Ubuntu) but probably the best of it all is that you have choice, don't like Unity, get gnome3, or xfce or whatever

MisterGaribaldi
June 2nd, 2012, 09:37 PM
Okay the "suitable hardware" line made me laugh (though i get your points with the other lines), i've ran linux with a good gui on systems with a p2 and 128 mb ram and selfbuild minimal ones on 16mb ram.

And yes, i choose linux above windows and mac but not because gnome (even mwm will do). But i choose it because it perfectly fits with what i want from an os, on linux i feel like the os is working with me and not the other way around.

Hey roelforg!

I guess what I was getting at with the "suitable hardware" was that I have no hardware available to run Linux. I'm down to just having my MBP, and so this leaves me with nothing to run Linux as a desktop OS on.

Wilker
June 2nd, 2012, 10:28 PM
when i started learning programming in college i noticed how easier was to write and compile codes using linux (specifically ubuntu)...i just had to write it in gedit and compile in terminal and wouldn't need to pay for example microsoft visual studio for that.

the whole open source thing is simply wonderful. an example: we use a software called openfoam, for computational fluid dynamics, and this simply does what expensive softwares like fluent do. being open source allows people from all over the world to develop/improve a code, and share it.
sharing knowledge for free is enough for me for being in the project.

as desktop, i prefered ubuntu over windows seven when i tried lucid lynx at home . that was faster, was easier to find and use certain softwares...i never got a random problem like i had with windows XP. at the end i was so used to ubuntu that i didn't want neither need to use windows anymore.

peyre
June 3rd, 2012, 05:20 AM
when i started learning programming in college i noticed how easier was to write and compile codes using linux (specifically ubuntu)...i just had to write it in gedit and compile in terminal and wouldn't need to pay for example microsoft visual studio for that.

the whole open source thing is simply wonderful. an example: we use a software called openfoam, for computational fluid dynamics, and this simply does what expensive softwares like fluent do. being open source allows people from all over the world to develop/improve a code, and share it.
sharing knowledge for free is enough for me for being in the project.


Yep. I'm involved in an open-source project (Race Into Space (http://sourceforge.net/projects/raceintospace/)), and when I work on it, I edit the code in gedit and compile in Xubuntu. Piece of cake, as programming goes. I'm much more familiar with Windows, but I have no idea how to compile RIS in Windows, only Linux, and that's easy.

nsthk
June 3rd, 2012, 05:27 AM
For me the problems of adware, spam and viruses on windows are a big turn off and I'm a big fan of open source that works!

VE6EFR
June 3rd, 2012, 05:43 AM
I still have both windows 7 and Ubuntu on this computer. I haven't had to go into Windows other than to find an email that I haven't moved over to Thunderbird. I find the stability and security that Ubuntu offers far outclasses what Windows brings to the table.

However one thing that Windows can never offer is what has been provided in this community. I have learned more from reading all of your posts than I have ever learned when I was a full time windows user. When I had a problem I was able to come here and ask my question. Not only was I able to find a solution I learned a great deal in the process.

UltimateCat
June 3rd, 2012, 06:01 AM
I haven't been to my Windows partition since December of this year.

The only reason I am even hanging on to Windows is because Ubuntu doesn't recognize my Kodak printer.

Any reason I choose Ubuntu is it works great with the GIMP program.

Windows consistently booted me off and out of GIMP when it was installed on my Windows side.

I'm an Artist and don't have time for programs shutting down on me.

nomohakon
July 26th, 2012, 11:35 PM
My favorite web browser, Opera, dont work on xubuntu as good as it did on Windows.
My favorite Bittorrent client is not to be found and the replacement seems to forget his settings sometimes (also setting them is pain).
Everithing is more clicks away than in my nLited Win XP.

On desktop im using XP (reliable, no surprises), on notebook im using Xubuntu (new way to look at things, learning C++).

dont get me wrong i like linux i just dont know it like windows.

vexorian
July 27th, 2012, 12:54 AM
I haven't been to my Windows partition since December of this year.

The only reason I am even hanging on to Windows is because Ubuntu doesn't recognize my Kodak printer.

Any reason I choose Ubuntu is it works great with the GIMP program.

Windows consistently booted me off and out of GIMP when it was installed on my Windows side.

I'm an Artist and don't have time for programs shutting down on me.
You shall try virtual Box and connect the Kodak printer to it. If you only use windows for that stuff, you can just run windows as a virtual Box when you need to use that printer. Instead of rebooting.

I do that with my HP scanner.

We are reaching a time in which Ubuntu has better support than windows XP. Newer laptops have drivers that just don't work in XP (I just tried setting up a 2012 laptop for a guy that wanted XP and failed utterly).

I guess that sets it, even if I wanted to switch to windows, I would not be able to use Windows XP in newer computer and vista, 7 or 8 are quite not my style. I guess I will have no choice but to stick with Ubuntu. It is a good thing that I want to.

offgridguy
August 3rd, 2012, 02:29 AM
I have not found many advantages either, maybe the only one is is lack of viruses and malware
that is so prevelant on windows.

HeinS5
August 6th, 2012, 05:21 PM
Basically windows is ****.
It is slow, unsafe, unreliable and expensive. And if you want something difficult e.g. an encrypted partition it is almost impossible.

mamamia88
August 6th, 2012, 06:05 PM
Simple it's faster, less hassle, and does what i need.

Dragonbite
August 6th, 2012, 06:30 PM
It's easier to move the hard drive from one machine to another without it taking hours of trying to detect, download (*if* it can see the NIC), reboot and update for the new hardware.

All I had to do was rename /etc/X11/xorg.conf to a backup name and viola! It worked without error/issue on next bootup! Woo Hoo!

trickyubun2
August 7th, 2012, 01:20 AM
I moved to linux about 8 years ago, after a few struggles and hopping from distro to distro (I tried to persevere with ubuntu but the clever types in the forums drove me away). I settled on mepis8 and all was good in my world. My peripherals worked as soon as I plugged them in and everything else worked wonderfully. I laughed at my girlfriend on her vista laptop and I spent many hours fixing it for her when it played up. Because of our nationality we really need webcams to work on web pages (flash), if not we don't see our families on the other side of the world. We also need our printer to work.

Unfortunately I've come to a sorry pass with linux. Mepis8 died the death. I've tried everything including the newer releases of mepis but now there is not a single linux distro that will let us use our webcams, we can work the printer (epsom) but it makes the most awful crashing noise as it starts up and knocks out at least two of the cartridges every time. Even with using non brand cartridges it's costing me a fortune.

I'm worn out trawling all the forums for answers, I'm fed up with people telling me to build a kernel, extract something and change a line, give it some sudo et al. And after all the copying and pasting into the command line I'm still no nearer getting it to work properly.

I hated windows for it's bloat, it's cost, it's viruses, and many other things. But you know what? If I fire up my windows laptop right now - I will be able to see my relatives and friends on the other side of the world while I chat to them, I could print off a letter or anything else) without scaring the horses.

I've been back on Ubuntu for about three months, very pretty, but why did they make so much effort on eye candy and yet according to the compatibility list it only supports two makes of webcam?

Sometimes I feel as though we're being driven back to windows, but it could be so different!

vexorian
August 7th, 2012, 03:42 AM
meh, if your webcam maker are so important that they can make you switch to windows due to their losey linux support. As opposed to switching webcam maker, Then you should really switch back to windows.

MichaelEber
August 7th, 2012, 03:43 AM
I've been a Windows user since the 1990's and recently moved to Ubuntu.
Why?

1) I got Win-Seresef which disabled all of my security and corrupted my system. It was a virus that would have required I reformat and reinstall. My Windows 7 CD is god-knows-where and so I tried / then moved / to Ubuntu.

2) Have seen the direction with Windows 8. That will be a bigger failure than Vista was. It is compromising the desktop for tablet paradigm trying to be something to all things and weak for all.

Wine can still let you run Windows programs. But I get a stable system and once I can get Avast! installed I'm guaranteed of no crap on my machine anymore. Don't listen to Linux bigots though, linux and IOs can still get infected....it's just alot harder.

neodirtchief
August 7th, 2012, 04:18 AM
I am still new to Ubuntu but I am pleased so far. Linux allows you to fit your operating system to your needs without the bloat. As far as Microsoft and Windows,,,,I got tired of the constant upgrades. It starts with Internet Explorer that forces you to upgrade to the next one, then makes you install programs and patches just to view certain web content because nothing is compatible. Explorer keeps telling you that an error has occurred and then takes you to a site to fix it and the only solution is to download the next version. As far as Windows, they should have stopped at XP. Of course Microsoft isn't the only one out there "telling" everyone what is best.

mamamia88
August 7th, 2012, 06:26 AM
I am still new to Ubuntu but I am pleased so far. Linux allows you to fit your operating system to your needs without the bloat. As far as Microsoft and Windows,,,,I got tired of the constant upgrades. It starts with Internet Explorer that forces you to upgrade to the next one, then makes you install programs and patches just to view certain web content because nothing is compatible. Explorer keeps telling you that an error has occurred and then takes you to a site to fix it and the only solution is to download the next version. As far as Windows, they should have stopped at XP. Of course Microsoft isn't the only one out there "telling" everyone what is best.um your complaints all seem to be ie based. install chrome or firefox problem solved. not trying to sound rude or anything but your complaints are easily enough fixed. and be really careful when ie is trying to send you to a site to download the next version of ie. could easily be some kind of malware. ie versions don't come out that often and should be updated via windows update anyway.

trickyubun2
August 7th, 2012, 08:32 AM
Vexorian's reply to me hits the nail on the head. Linux support for webcams is so bad that we're driven back into the arms of windows. Why is it like this?

ammofreak
August 7th, 2012, 09:20 AM
Hi everyone ):P:
Been perusing the comments on this recurring discussion & noticed opinions have not changed too much since I started using Linux in 2009. Gaming support & drivers for peripherals are still considered the top 2 short comings of any Linux based distro & the reason(s) why some return to mainly using Windows. Despite these 2 failings, I found myself using Linux more & more as I learned the "ins & outs" of the operating system. Today, I use Ubuntu for all my serious computing needs. I have a headless web server (10.04LTS) on a Dell Dim9150 (learning Joomla for a site at www.switchnexus.com) & a development server/desktop (12.04LTS) on a Dell Dim8400. The idea that one can freely obtain the operating systems & software to develop, code, and basically create as far as the imagination limits itself is, to me, mind boggling (the costs with Windows would be in the $1000s)! I just want to THANK all the people responsible for open source software! Rock on Linux & the Open Source Community!!!:guitar:
PS: Please contribute to the Open Source Community. Thank you!:)

Jakin
August 7th, 2012, 10:32 AM
Windows (version 7 anyway) is safe if you know how to be safe- safeguards on your browsers and junk.. be careful what you download... and anything i had on windows (hardware and such) also worked fine on linux.

I have not had a single virus or spyware/adware issue on windows in years.. that being said Im just more comfortable on a linux system but wont just throw away windows.

valley1967
August 8th, 2012, 12:41 AM
Free not just as in Free to download etc but free of spyware malware I'm not tied into a two year support cycle but get five years alot of the apps I use can do the same stuff and better some times we can uninstall the browser if we don't want it and install the one we want and the number one with me no EULA

See you one the Flip Side

PaulInBHC
August 8th, 2012, 03:54 AM
um your complaints all seem to be ie based. install chrome or firefox problem solved. not trying to sound rude or anything but your complaints are easily enough fixed. and be really careful when ie is trying to send you to a site to download the next version of ie. could easily be some kind of malware. ie versions don't come out that often and should be updated via windows update anyway.

I think what he is saying is like Win98 couldn't get IE8, my XP can't have IE9. Not a problem until your bank or online store only works with IE or you want to watch something that needs Silverlight. Doesn't happen often but is annoying.

Firefox has come a long way since I gave up on Netscape 4.7 and went back to IE. Then I tried FF, Safari, Chrome and back to FF.

vexorian
August 8th, 2012, 08:28 PM
Vexorian's reply to me hits the nail on the head. Linux support for webcams is so bad that we're driven back into the arms of windows. Why is it like this?
Please complain to your webcam maker. A hardware maker that supports Linux poorly and does not even bother releasing specs so that at least the community supports it. They are the cause and wholly responsible of the problem, and you are part of it if you buy their products.

Dragonbite
August 8th, 2012, 08:46 PM
Please complain to your webcam maker. A hardware maker that supports Linux poorly and does not even bother releasing specs so that at least the community supports it. They are the cause and wholly responsible of the problem, and you are part of it if you buy their products.

My problem is usually not the stuff I buy, it is the stuff my (uninformed) parents get for myself and my kids!

trickyubun2
August 10th, 2012, 12:49 AM
Vexorian, please understand that my webcams worked perfectly with Mepis8, but now they don't work with any linux distro at all. I'm trying to point out that if it was possible for mepis8 to support them so effortlessly, then surely Ubuntu 12.04 (or other distro's) could do so - if they had the will!

johnathansmith
August 10th, 2012, 12:57 AM
Here is few reasons why i choose Ubuntu over Win
1.Huge community base
2.Simple installing process
3.Simple rescue process if something gone wrong
4.No need for antivirus, than mean more performance for me!
5.Zero $ for downloading $ using $ installing

I hope at least 2-3 reasons we all have common :guitar:

Dragonbite
August 10th, 2012, 03:17 AM
When I increased the box my 32 bit Ubuntu was residing in to 6 GB I was able to add the PAE kernel and see "all" of the RAM.

And when I decide to upgrade it, I don't have to pay for a whole new OS to refresh with a 64 bit version.

Buntu Bunny
August 19th, 2012, 06:45 PM
Linux allows you to fit your operating system to your needs without the bloat. As far as Microsoft and Windows,,,,I got tired of the constant upgrades. It starts with Internet Explorer that forces you to upgrade to the next one, then makes you install programs and patches just to view certain web content because nothing is compatible. Explorer keeps telling you that an error has occurred and then takes you to a site to fix it and the only solution is to download the next version. As far as Windows, they should have stopped at XP.

My sentiments exactly. With Windows, I always felt like I had to wait in line behind all the apps and programs checking for uptdates, waiting for my turn to use my own computer.

williamwhite
August 19th, 2012, 11:05 PM
I chose ubuntu and lubuntu for my computers because they had windows vista on them and it was the OS that was slow not the hardware, also one of my computers is a netbook and all the security software left me with 20% of the cpu I could use, as well as having trouble finding drivers and things, and having the os eat half of my ram it was annoying. Then I found Linux looking for music free music editing software, and I only think I will go back to windows for a gaming computer if WINE doesn't support it.

danyc05
August 20th, 2012, 12:28 AM
The first time I used Ubuntu was because I got the blue screen of death on my old desktop that had windows xp. I started off with Ubuntu 9.10. It made my old desktop run like it was new. Ever since then I always stayed with Linux. I've tried basically all the major distrubution but always came back to Ubuntu. Now that Im in college I had a new laptop with Windows 7 and used it for a while but I just recently switched back to Ubuntu and run Windows 7 on virtualbox with all the necessary applications that I need for school. Ubuntu seems to be a good path and it also seems that good things are coming to the Linux community. Here's my pros and cons list too:

Pros:

-Free
-I actually get excited to get updates.
-It works very good with my laptop (Toshiba Satellite L505D)
-Unity actually proves to be useful after getting use to it.

Cons:

-Netflix doesnt work.
-I use Adobe products for school.
-I still havent found a good dj software. (Mixxx doesnt compare to Virtual Dj or Traktor Pro)
-Ive noticed that when I watch movies, it lags just a little. It may not be noticeable to someone else but I did notice the difference when I switched to Ubuntu from Windows. ( I have a ATI Radeon 4200 mobile graphics card.)

For now the first 3 cons are solved by using Virtualbox, but I would like to see native support.

codingman
August 20th, 2012, 12:45 AM
Cause I like the color choices :lolflag:

Also because it's actually customizable!

And FREE!!!

I don't feel like listing all of them, but here are three obvious ones.

Bobik-s
August 27th, 2012, 02:49 PM
I've installed Ubuntu 9.04 out of curiosity on virtaul machine and was so impressed that you don't need to look for necessary programs through the internet. The very idea of repository and ability to install everything you want with just 1 click is amazing and it's what you've never had in Windows. No cracks, no keygens, no sharewares, no virals, no annoying bullpups. Now I'm so relaxed while working at my laptop.

Dragonbite
August 27th, 2012, 02:53 PM
I've installed Ubuntu 9.04 out of curiosity on virtaul machine and was so impressed that you don't need to look for necessary programs through the internet. The very idea of repository and ability to install everything you want with just 1 click is amazing and it's what you've never had in Windows. No cracks, no keygens, no sharewares, no virals, no annoying bullpups. Now I'm so relaxed while working at my laptop.

That's why the App Stores are so popular; it brings the repositories Linux users have enjoyed for years to the masses.

And Ubuntu is trying to bridge the gap by including for-pay applications as well!

hwyckoff
September 9th, 2012, 08:14 PM
I prefer Linux over Windows because:


The OS and most of the programs I use are free.
The system is secure by nature against many existing malware, viri, etc.
I can run "obsolete" computers in Linux and they perform as good as the newest hardware.
It's open source, with a supportive community.


The only reason I still dual-boot with Windows 7 is because:

I sometimes need to remote into my work computer with Windows-only software.
So I can play DRM materials in iTunes and Amazon Player -- I refuse to "hack" my way into programs because I just don't want to go there.


The negatives to Linux have improved over the last few years I've been keeping an eye on it. When I first learned Linux in 2003, I had to do quite a bit in Terminal. With Ubuntu, so much is automated or at least possible through a graphic interface, which makes the transition from Microsoft or Apple to Linux a lot easier.

I gave up trying to get my BluRay drive to play commercial BluRay movies in Linux for now. Netflix and Amazon Player will not work in Linux without going through extraordinary hacks.

I just bought "Amnesia" through the Ubuntu Software Center. It took me half a day to download through a really good internet connection, but it was worth it. I heard that Valve will soon offer games for Linux, which I am looking forward to.

I wait for the day that I can make the full transition to Linux and say good riddance to Windows. Until then, Ubuntu is the OS I boot out of preference.

johnnyhop
October 9th, 2012, 05:13 PM
As someomne living on a shoestring budget and not having a problem getting hand me down computers linux is light on the budget. I've tried several distros and am partial to the KDE desktop. I've come to three favorite distros: Kubuntu, Mepis and Fedora. As a hobby I fix up hand me down towers install one of the three preferred distros and donate them to poor folk and non-profit orgs.:)

Since I'm not into gaming I deon't miss Windows and if needed can always use an XP machine at work after hours.

rmcellig
October 9th, 2012, 05:38 PM
Hi Johnnyhop,

I feel exactly the way you do. I have a 24" iMac that I rarely use now since discovering the beauty of Linux. I have four computers at the moment all given to me and all 5-12 years old. They all work great with the approprite distros on each one. At the moment, Xubuntu 12.04 is my fav. I also use Puppy Linux as well. I am doing stuff in Linux that I would never attempt to do on my iMac and love it!

stanleyella
October 10th, 2012, 12:15 AM
it's a challenge and seems easier to install.downloaded the iso and burned cd in win.selfbooted.all new and strange

Nkosi
October 24th, 2012, 03:28 PM
Logitech's webcams have been "out-of-the-box" friendly for me on Ubuntu 12.04 -- no problems at all.

Ubuntu has kept me virus free for 7 years now. My kids don't ask to use my laptop ever ;) so I'm free to work more at home. I'm able to maintenance Windows USB memory sticks at work for all my Windows colleagues. My data security is significantly tighter than virtually all of my friends or colleagues on other systems. It lets me do what I need to do. Support when I need it, is comparable to Apple's.

Argenteus
October 25th, 2012, 05:35 AM
I can think of many.

First is freedom. Many will argue that they will never make use of that freedom anyways, but even if you never do, you still want to have that freedom. Is freedom of speech unimportant if you have nothing to say? I think not.

Second is configurability, extensibility and speed. I can make my Ubuntu box into whatever I need it to be very easily. Windows? You need unsupported proprietary software like Windowblinds to customize even the simplest of things. It also runs blazing fast.

Third is the community. Windows users tend to either be incompetent or elitist. Here? We, for the most part, get along well. The tech gurus offer support simply and kindly, and there are very few who try to trick users for kicks.

Fourth is the lack of malware, as another already mentioned.

Atomic-Fanboy
October 25th, 2012, 01:45 PM
Why do I choose Ubuntu? Simple... I use Wubi. It means I don't need to choose :P

Paneless
October 26th, 2012, 01:53 PM
Originally, back in 2009, I had a then old IBM Think Pad. Somebody that had had it before me had installed a not so genuine version of XP. Eventually, this ceased to operate but I was able to down load Ubuntu desktop 09.10. This ran through to the following year and I bought this Compaq desktop with Windows 7 (Home Premium) preloaded. I suppose I just "put up with" having windows until about May this year. I stumbled across a DVD with 10.10 on, loaded it as dual boot, upgraded it to 12.04. Finding that I actually preferred Ubuntu for the whole host of reasons that have already been mentioned, I installed 12.04 as my only OS. Yesterday, I installed Win7 on a virtual box, ran it this morning and then came the update messages: Restart to install important updates, Do not switch off or unplug your machine, which was ok the first time, 2 updates, then came 16 updates, then 104 and after that one more just for good measure. About two hours later and windows is up to date BUT STILL NOWHERE NEAR UBUNTU.:smile:

engineerarun
November 3rd, 2012, 09:03 PM
This is why I chose Linux in the first place -
http://oldpapyrus.wordpress.com/2012/10/02/why-did-i-choose-linux/

Professionally I became a software engineer working on Linux platforms. I used OpenSuSE with KDE for 3 years. But once I installed Ubuntu I fell in love with Gnome, the huge supportive community and finally the user-friendliness of the OS. I found that it was too easy to learn even for people who do not work regularly with computers or have a background in computers.

Mikeb85
November 3rd, 2012, 10:44 PM
Ease of use, ease of setting up a home network with cloud technologies. Integration with Google services, and other social and web platforms. Freedom - the knowledge that my OS can't be taken away or modified in a way that I can't control.

Also, performance and proliferation of development tools.

jaimerosario
November 14th, 2012, 09:22 AM
Why to choose Linux over Windows:

1. New computers come with pre-installed Windows, with lots of cripple software. Takes a lot of time to get rid of them.
2. Updates. Windows downloads updates, installs them. Reboots... then again, downloads more updates, installs them, reboots... I had almost like 2 days updating a computer. With Linux, just one process to download updates and reboot if required.
3. Windows security software like firewalls/antivirus bundles constipates the whole system, and you get positives, false positives, hung apps, etc. Since I've been using Linux, only hung apps.
4. Most Windows applications are not free/libre. When you need to achieve something without money, you try with the first thing, get it for free. And that's when software piracy beats free software. With Linux, I have what I need, not with bells and whistles, but I can do it, with my mind relaxed, and not spending money.
5. Performance - Need to say more?

I have to admit that Linux is not easy to deal with. It takes time to adapt when changing from Windows (I've been using Windows since 3.11, then stopped with XP). But I really like is that I know how to troubleshoot any problem with just looking at the logs. Microsoft, has a Support database so extensive, that even logs matching an Event ID in particular, the solution is not available with the help they provide. In my case, only hardware where the problems in my Linux systems. And Linux is not perfect, but stable.

fyfe54
November 14th, 2012, 11:24 AM
The only reason I am even hanging on to Windows is because Ubuntu doesn't recognize my Kodak printer.
.

Start here for the printer. http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1963303
I have ESP C310 and it works just fine.

Dragonbite
November 14th, 2012, 04:34 PM
Why to choose Linux over Windows:

1. New computers come with pre-installed Windows, with lots of cripple software. Takes a lot of time to get rid of them.
2. Updates. Windows downloads updates, installs them. Reboots... then again, downloads more updates, installs them, reboots... I had almost like 2 days updating a computer. With Linux, just one process to download updates and reboot if required.
3. Windows security software like firewalls/antivirus bundles constipates the whole system, and you get positives, false positives, hung apps, etc. Since I've been using Linux, only hung apps.
4. Most Windows applications are not free/libre. When you need to achieve something without money, you try with the first thing, get it for free. And that's when software piracy beats free software. With Linux, I have what I need, not with bells and whistles, but I can do it, with my mind relaxed, and not spending money.
5. Performance - Need to say more?

I have to admit that Linux is not easy to deal with. It takes time to adapt when changing from Windows (I've been using Windows since 3.11, then stopped with XP). But I really like is that I know how to troubleshoot any problem with just looking at the logs. Microsoft, has a Support database so extensive, that even logs matching an Event ID in particular, the solution is not available with the help they provide. In my case, only hardware where the problems in my Linux systems. And Linux is not perfect, but stable.


Supposedly computers sold via the Microsoft store come without crapware, but you have to pay extra for them (huh?)
Agree, updates are a pain-in-the-but
Security Essentials has not been bad on my Windows 7 system. Unfortunately Kaspersky on my work computer drags the system across a bed of nails every so often.
Many of the bigger open source projects are available for Windows as well (LibreOffice, Gimp, Inkscape, Blender, Calligre Office, Calibre, Banshee, Amarok(?), etc.). I find this handy to get people used to the FOSS applications so changing from one system to the other is a lot easier.
Performance definitely takes a hit in Windows compared to Linux. I run Windows 7 and Ubuntu 12.04 on the same laptop and while both are reasonably responsive, Ubuntu feels like it is faster at launching applications.

Mr_JMM
November 14th, 2012, 06:04 PM
I would propose a better questions is: "Why do you choose Windows over Ubuntu?"

In addition to all the obvious reasons that have been mentioned...
The windows based software I have and use daily - Fireworks and Photoshop - run using Wine.
For games I have a multitude of game systems.
I'm not daft enough to use apple products (but the OH's iPod library can be edited in Ubuntu).

Why would I use an OS that costs money, is susceptible to viruses and has more bugs than any RC version of *buntu when a free option exists that works perfectly for me. Having said that, I'd still use Ubuntu if canonical charged for it.

Of course, if you need software that can only run on Windows then of course, you need windows (just to answer my proposed question above).

DiabolicalClaptrap
February 16th, 2013, 12:12 AM
Why choose Linux over Windows? Why not?

I won't say Linux is impervious to viruses, trojans, worms and other things of that nature but the core product is built in such a way that users have one less security flaw to worry about. I find Windows to be fatally flawed in that regard.
Also:



My hardware runs right out of the box.
For me, the performance increase from Windows -> Ubuntu is noticeable, even with the eye candy.
Smarter apps/operations that allow the user to have fine tuned control over their app or process they're going through.
I find preload to be more efficient than superfetch.
You can customize the look and feel of the OS as you please. May take a little digging with Ubuntu but it can be done.
Apparmor
I think it has a good balance between usability and DIY.
Updates are more frequent.
I don't have to deal with a company that forces me to keep something on my computer that I don't want (IE)

offgridguy
February 16th, 2013, 04:00 AM
Why choose ubuntu over windows? I wouldn't. I use whatever works.

pfeiffep
February 17th, 2013, 11:04 PM
Basically I dont see any advantages to using linux over windows xp, Im dual booting windows and ubuntu. Ubuntu is nice and all but I dont see anything that would make me prefer it over windows.The only thing i have been using ubuntu for is web browsing playing music/movies (cant play games) which I can do better/hassle free in windows.

So what are the advantages of l using linux over xp?


WinXP will stop being supported next year:popcorn: so when a harware failure occurs you might not be able to obtain drivers for replacements

Linux is FREE

Linux is less of a resource hog that WinXP (or for that matter Win??) and will run much faster tan XP on older hardware.

Libre Office is FREE and is pretty comparable to MS Office

Possibly WINE will enable you to run games


Pete

Brizlitman
February 18th, 2013, 03:28 AM
I can't mess around with windows the way i can with ubuntu. Also i enjoy not having to care about viruses

Cajamarcawarrior
March 12th, 2013, 01:08 PM
Really the main reason is performance issues. Since I install too many scientific programs and games on Windows7, it is working slower and it wastes nearly 5 minutes for startup. Even If I remove some programs, due to the registry issues, I can not get my old performance back. And when I use registry cleaning programs, at the end they always remove some documents needed for windows, so the windows does not work normal anymore.

I heard that whatever you install in linux, it doesn't loose anything in performance. I am not an advanced user, but so far I already installed many programs and I don't feel any loss in performance. Another thing I heard is that when I remove a program in linux, it is being totally removed (I don't know if it is true though).

So the main reason is, I feel free to install programs in linux, try those programs and remove the ones I don't like.

mamamia88
March 12th, 2013, 03:46 PM
Really the main reason is performance issues. Since I install too many scientific programs and games on Windows7, it is working slower and it wastes nearly 5 minutes for startup. Even If I remove some programs, due to the registry issues, I can not get my old performance back. And when I use registry cleaning programs, at the end they always remove some documents needed for windows, so the windows does not work normal anymore.

I heard that whatever you install in linux, it doesn't loose anything in performance. I am not an advanced user, but so far I already installed many programs and I don't feel any loss in performance. Another thing I heard is that when I remove a program in linux, it is being totally removed (I don't know if it is true though).

So the main reason is, I feel free to install programs in linux, try those programs and remove the ones I don't like.

What registry cleaning program are you using? Try ccleaner. It never removed anything i didn't need before.

justincarter
March 13th, 2013, 06:31 AM
I completed switched myself on Ubuntu. It's working great after installing all the supportive softwares. I am working in a government organization. There are lot of private documents which i have to keep with me. Ubuntu is complete safe and no one can easily hack the system in Ubuntu. It doesn't support .exe . Most viruses and malware have exe extension . which becomes the major cause of leaking your files and documents. Laptop Repair Austin (http://tristarcc.com/laptop-repair/)

justincarter
March 13th, 2013, 06:35 AM
cc cleaner is awesome. I used that software for cleaning my computer temporary files and cache . It works great and increase the processing speed of your system as well.

dave2001
March 14th, 2013, 03:25 AM
Windows does tend to get slower the longer you have an installation. I don't think it's all just registry issues causing that problem. In any case, be careful with Ccleaner... one time it borked my windows install so badly (no keyboard or mouse input) I had to reimage my drive.

Linux stays just as snappy as the day you installed it! Assuming you keep your startup applications down to a minimum of course.

krishna.988
March 19th, 2013, 11:02 AM
I don't want to start a new thread on this topic, Instead I would ask

What makes people to go back to Windows rather than sticking to Ubuntu?

aysiu
March 19th, 2013, 01:22 PM
I don't want to start a new thread on this topic, Instead I would ask

What makes people to go back to Windows rather than sticking to Ubuntu? Based on the hundreds of "I'm going back to Windows" threads I've read over the past eight years here, I'd say it really boils down to one or both of the following:

1. There is an absolutely mission-critical personal or professional Windows-only program the user needs that does not run or run fully functionally in Ubuntu.

2. Someone or multiple people in the Linux community oversold Ubuntu as a drop-in replacement for Windows, and when the user does not find that to be the case, she leaves, frustrated (totally different interface/way of doing things, hardware incompatibility troubleshooting, etc.).

peyre
March 19th, 2013, 04:03 PM
I don't want to start a new thread on this topic, Instead I would ask

What makes people to go back to Windows rather than sticking to Ubuntu?

What aysiu said, but also...I sometimes toy with the idea when I run into Ubuntu's rough edges: when it insists on moving my Desktop icons around on bootup instead of leaving them where I put them, when it resets my screen's refresh rate to a flickering 60Hz and I have to manually reset it every time I boot up*, when I get something working just right and it totally breaks with the next Ubuntu upgrade, etc.

* Yes, I'm still on a CRT. I'm supporting a family of four on a state salary...

Dragonbite
March 19th, 2013, 08:34 PM
I don't want to start a new thread on this topic, Instead I would ask

What makes people to go back to Windows rather than sticking to Ubuntu?

I have half-gone back to Windows for a few reasons

Compatibility; hardware and software just work and in some cases works more efficiently.
Microsoft Office
SkyDrive; because 25GB for free is really nice for storing files plus it includes web-based tools for opening and editing files in the browser or a locally installed Office program without having ot download.
Visual Studio; because I am needing to code just to get coding and Visual Studio plus .NET is what I have been trained in and use at work.
Windows Live programs; I find them easy and intuitive
I have an old, old game that works in Windows but I haven't managed to get it working in Linux yet
All of this desktop environment changes leaves me not fully happy with any of them at this point (though Xfce in Xubuntu is winning at the current time).
ADD


At the same time, I am also using Linux.

On the server-side, it is a no-brainer and i use Linux in one form (Ubuntu server) or another (Zentyal).

neruson
March 23rd, 2013, 06:54 PM
I don't choose one over the other. They both serve their purpose for me. Windows is far from perfect but so is Ubuntu and Linux in general. I use Linux for pretty much everything except for Netflix and most of my gaming. The Linux Netflix app is buggy and has terrible video quality and while I do use Steam for Linux a lot I've bought over 40 games on Steam over the years and until they are all ported to Linux (which I doubt -but still hope- will happen with a lot of them) I'm going to continue to be a dual booter.

krishna.988
March 25th, 2013, 12:12 PM
I have half-gone back to Windows for a few reasons

Compatibility; hardware and software just work and in some cases works more efficiently.
Microsoft Office
SkyDrive; because 25GB for free is really nice for storing files plus it includes web-based tools for opening and editing files in the browser or a locally installed Office program without having ot download.
Visual Studio; because I am needing to code just to get coding and Visual Studio plus .NET is what I have been trained in and use at work.
Windows Live programs; I find them easy and intuitive
I have an old, old game that works in Windows but I haven't managed to get it working in Linux yet
All of this desktop environment changes leaves me not fully happy with any of them at this point (though Xfce in Xubuntu is winning at the current time).
ADD


At the same time, I am also using Linux.

On the server-side, it is a no-brainer and i use Linux in one form (Ubuntu server) or another (Zentyal).


This proves most of your important work is done by Windows..Then why do we have to use Linux..People might argue Freedom, Choice, liberty to customize etc..But all comes with cost of time.. People spend most of the time sometimes hours together to get some simple work done...At the end of the day.. That is what is called Linux world...:D

dcialdella
March 25th, 2013, 02:17 PM
I think
"if you ask this questions, please DONT USE linux"

I'm not a fanatic.

HackerFinn
March 26th, 2013, 01:37 AM
Simply put: It's customizeable and stable. No-one dictates my experience but me. :)

krishna.988
March 26th, 2013, 07:16 AM
It is a fact which was mentioned, so no offence.It is just a discussion..

linux_one
March 26th, 2013, 08:00 AM
its true that sometimes linux is technical and not suitable for everyone, but it is becoming more easily accessible with time.
there is no doubt about Superiority of linux and free software, terrible bugs happen all the time in windowzee too, but often no one can fix them no matter how technically knowledgeable one is,
to all dear windowzz/macz/etc-heads please stick back to your MSTabletz/etcz and dont waste your time here;
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N1zxDa3t0fg

krishna.988
March 26th, 2013, 09:45 AM
The question is not about doubts here.. Again both are just operating systems.. but we are all here if we have good working knowledge we should strive hard to fix the major problems in linux as of 2013

http://linuxfonts.narod.ru/why.linux.is.not.ready.for.the.desktop.current.htm l

t.rei
March 27th, 2013, 08:40 AM
I am now actively choosing windows over ubuntu - not because I like it or because the os is better, but because I get a working kalendar and contacts sync going.

Give me a way to do:
- calendar
- contacts
- mail

Sync (both directions!) with:
computer
laptop
phone

without
a lot of time (really, that's my most precious commodity these days :/ )

It's sad. :( Hopefully things will get better, but as it stands: there is no proper (say: easy, fast-set-up, flawless) cal/contact/sync support anywhere in ubuntu (say: linux). :(

krishna.988
March 27th, 2013, 08:50 AM
+1 I agree to this

prodigy_
March 27th, 2013, 10:14 AM
there is no proper (say: easy, fast-set-up, flawless) cal/contact/sync support anywhere in ubuntu (say: linux). :(
Gmail is not OS dependent. That covers mail/contacts sync to anywhere. And Thunderbird supports Google calendar via an add-on.

You choose to buy Windows - that's your right. :) But saying there's no fast and easy way to do such basic things on Linux is just plain wrong.

Nicovdm
March 27th, 2013, 11:13 AM
I don't want to start a new thread on this topic, Instead I would ask

What makes people to go back to Windows rather than sticking to Ubuntu?


Preferably i would like to fully change over to a Linux distro, the only reason holding me back (and i must say, 90% of my company), is mail....
Everything i can do on Windows for work purposes, i can do on Linux except for MS Exchange. its been years, why has there not been any advancements in FULL Support in MS Exchange?
Android is linux based right? Why are they able support this via active sync, but Ubuntu not?

Personally, from our IT point of view, it is much easier to support linux based system, as we are using PXE deployments to our users (only call centers, banks, etc.), but each OS has their advantages and disadvantages.

rrich1974
March 27th, 2013, 12:17 PM
even if you use windows for the most part of your work, it would be e good idea to have ubuntu installed on your machine. just for the sake of knowing that there is an alternative to windows OS.
in my case, i was pretty surprised to see that my CAD software works pretty good in wine 1.5.xx. actually, for now, i use that CAD only in ubuntu. actually, i can say that i use windows for the sake of diversity.

linux_one
March 28th, 2013, 03:13 PM
krishna, I have a easter present for you, watch this
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N1zxDa3t0fg

and then go use what you like, why do you waste your time "=
most precious commodity" here?
go use your MSTablezz and save all your time ...
find a better hobby than using forums of what you dont like and never use ...

krishna.988
March 29th, 2013, 06:04 AM
@linux_one If that is your thinking I can't help it..I'm not a fan of either Linux or Windows. for your kind information..I use what works for me..and I don't want to waste time..What is your whole idea of sharing the video :lolflag: which is irrelevant for this discussion..It seems pretty infantile..try changing your cerebrations..

stylintile
April 26th, 2013, 01:01 PM
I like Ubuntu because:
No virus problems.
To install and fully takes about an hour. Windows=6-1/2+
I don't have to restart whenever anybody within five miles sneezes.
No virus problems.
Excellent free support from the forum.
Faster.
No virus problems.
More stable.
I don't have to go out and buy more programs to do what I need to do, they are either free, or already included. i.e. Photoshop/Gimp
I can change anything about my computer, such as motherboard and processor, and not have to spend a couple of hours on the phone trying to get it re-activated.
And did I mention no virus problems? I don't have to buy software, or take a chance with the free stuff, to "protect" my computer from malicious idiots.
And the biggest reason that got me started with Linux is....IT"S FREE!!!

rmcellig
April 26th, 2013, 03:45 PM
Yes it's free from a monetary point of view but for me and more importantly it's free as in freedom!! Freedom from Apple, and freedom from Microsoft, with a worldwide forum that is second to none. I LOVE Linux!!

arkark
April 27th, 2013, 01:13 AM
just curious about the reasons people switched to or have used a linux distro from the beginning--for fun, out of necessity for work/school, disliked other major OSs, strong feelings about open source/free software?

oldsoundguy
April 27th, 2013, 01:39 AM
Got fed up with the amount of time and energy needed to keep an on line Windows machine operational and safe. Installed 6.04 and have never looked back. Gone through 3 physical hardware upgrades and right now running 12.04. And everything is smooth.

pompel9
April 27th, 2013, 02:19 AM
Windows 8. When they openly admitted to include spyware in windows 8. I then started to look around for alternative OS. Came across ubuntu, and I really love it. I will never go back to windows.

This was right after 12.04 was released. So I installed that one, I really like unity. And for the supposedly likeness to mac, so not true. While ubuntu is very customizable, mac is closed. When I used mac there was always trouble with them. And the best part is, you cannot fix it yourself. You have to pay a huge amount of money to an expensive workshop. You can't upgrade mac hardware, you have to buy a new one to an outrages price.

Ok, enough ranting. Got carried away :)

deadflowr
April 27th, 2013, 02:23 AM
Fun.

It was only after installing it and running it for a while that I realized it(linux systems in general) could be highly useful and usable.

Haven't look back since.

And it's still fun.

MadmanRB
April 27th, 2013, 02:36 AM
My trek to Ubuntu was made before ubuntu was even a thing.
I started using linux after Windows XP started giving me issues especially after a failed update to service pack 2.
XP was a miserable experience for me, I considered buying a mac but they like now were way too pricey.
So Linux, but back then options were small.
Mandriva was still the big one back then as was Linspire (Lindows at the time) but both were heavily priced.
The free ones offered little, but eventually something came along that would make me use linux more regularly.
It wasnt Ubuntu it was another debian based distro called Mepis (and its still around today) and its what got me started.
Eventually it switched over to a ubuntu base and I used it and then used ubuntu.
Been on ubuntu since then going off and on but always coming back

ibjsb4
April 27th, 2013, 03:09 AM
Vista :(

Warprunner
April 27th, 2013, 03:21 AM
just curious about the reasons people switched to or have used a linux distro from the beginning--for fun, out of necessity for work/school, disliked other major OSs, strong feelings about open source/free software?

Fun, ability to adjust everything to my liking...and it's FAST! I still don't understand why people are still using windows? It is really a mystery.

:KS:KS:KS:KS:KS

cariboo907
April 27th, 2013, 03:22 AM
Merged two similar threads.

Dragonbite
April 27th, 2013, 06:36 AM
just curious about the reasons people switched to or have used a linux distro from the beginning--for fun, out of necessity for work/school, disliked other major OSs, strong feelings about open source/free software?

I started off in around 2003 because my Windows 8 was aging and I couldn't afford a Mac. Once I got into Linux there was no turning back...

prodigy_
April 27th, 2013, 08:26 AM
I still don't understand why people are still using windows? It is really a mystery.
Because on Linux flash videos @480p can eat 100% of a dual-core CPU and still stutter. Mystery solved?

Jason Kuzhively
April 27th, 2013, 09:12 AM
Because on Linux flash videos @480p can eat 100% of a dual-core CPU and still stutter. Mystery solved?

REALLY agree with you.

dpechiu
April 28th, 2013, 06:47 AM
I use Ubuntu because I hate blue screens, and because any unix is 10 time more poweful than any MS operating system.

TrainerCary
April 28th, 2013, 03:26 PM
I have a laptop and a netbook running xp, they work fine but the browsers are dropping support for xp so I would have to upgrade the OS, new windows versions may not be compatible with the hardware...and I would need to replace a lot of software. Ubuntu saved me the expense and aggravation. And it works faster and more reliably than Windows.

Jason Kuzhively
May 10th, 2013, 07:41 AM
I still dual-boot because no matter how perfect Linux is, Windows can do some things better than Linux. I use Windows once in a week. I'm in the music biz and LMMS is definitely not an alternative to FL Studio (It's the worst software I ever used on Linux).

Here are the reasons I choose Linux over Windows:

-Freedom: It gives me control over my PC.
-It's Free: Every time a new release comes out, I don't have to empty my wallet.
-No Drivers: I don't have to waste my time hunting for drivers, which, at times, only destroys my Computer.
-No Virus: Linux is really stable and it doesn't bother me about Turning the Firewall On or installing Security Updates which automatically reboot my computer.
-UbuntuForums: I love UbuntuForums, it truly is the greatest forum that exists on Planet Earth.
-Windows Bulls**t: Bing, MSN Messenger, Windows Media Player, INTERNET EXPLORER, etc. :mad::mad:
-The Blue Screen of Death: This used to be the thing that welcomed me to my PC.
-Desktop Environments: Windows users don't even know what DEs are.
-Customization!

yeswetran
May 19th, 2013, 10:31 PM
To quote one of my favorite singers:
"Never mind I'll find, an OS like you, oo
Have nothing but speed against you, too
Don't forget me, you begged,
so I VM-ed instead
Sometimes it lasts, hardware, but sometimes it crashes instead..."

Or one of my less favorite singers:
"You may be bigger than me,
richer than me,
and some more tech support than me,
but you ain't on Linux with me."

Did I say too much?

Sugiura Ayano
May 21st, 2013, 05:33 AM
I don't think I can completely ditch Windows (since I still need it for gaming, and I vastly prefer the Adobe suite over open source software) but having a Linux system really makes me feel more at home.

I don't have to worry about licences or malware, which is a definite plus. I also really like Ubuntu's UI over Windows 7, and Windows 7 used to be my favourite operating system of all time.

The only downside I can see is an increased reliance on terminal commands. After using Windows for 12 years (since I was 7! :D) it's pretty awkward for me to actually use the terminal. :P

prodigy_
May 21st, 2013, 09:47 AM
The only downside I can see is an increased reliance on terminal commands. After using Windows for 12 years (since I was 7! :D) it's pretty awkward for me to actually use the terminal. :P
GUI for everything is an outdated philosophy. With the advent of PowerShell command line in Windows is now used more often than ever before (among those who need fast, efficient and flexible solutions to routine tasks).

vexorian
May 21st, 2013, 04:14 PM
Because on Linux flash videos @480p can eat 100% of a dual-core CPU and still stutter. Mystery solved?That's a problem with the flash plugin not Linux.

It is a waste of time to use flash to play videos anyway. Much easier and better to download the videos directly (I used to use Downloadhelper, now I use jDownloader) and then you can play them at will from your hard ware using an efficient player like VLC. In addition, you get to keep the videos you like so you can watch them when internet goes off line or slow. Thanks to jdownloader, I get to download webm directly from youtube and all is great.

Dragonbite
May 23rd, 2013, 02:40 PM
That's a problem with the flash plugin not Linux.

Well it *is* a problem *for* Linux if this turns people away from Linux.

The good thing is that the dominance of Flash is getting weaker and weaker as HTML5 continues to mature.

prodigy_
May 23rd, 2013, 04:29 PM
That's a problem with the flash plugin not Linux.

It is a waste of time to use flash to play videos anyway.
Now you just need to explain this to all non-geek end users. I guess there's at least a billion of them in the world so good luck. :)

Whether we like it or not, Flash is here to stay. FOSS alternatives to Adobe Flash Player need to be developed but there's little progress in this direction because Adobe hates the idea behind FOSS and FOSS community hates Adobe. In the end everyone loses and the problem with flash support is perpetuated.

vexorian
May 23rd, 2013, 07:13 PM
Now you just need to explain this to all non-geek end users. I already did. With jdownloader it is as easy as copying the video's URL to the clipboard.


Whether we like it or not, Flash is here to stay iOS marketshare is doing just fine without it.

linnan
May 23rd, 2013, 07:19 PM
Because one morning I woke up and realize all the programs that I was using in Windows was on Linux too.

mustafi05
June 1st, 2013, 01:05 PM
because what an average people do with windows can be done in ubuntu.

jaccav
June 4th, 2013, 02:09 AM
I would propose a better questions is: "Why do you choose Windows over Ubuntu?"

In addition to all the obvious reasons that have been mentioned...
The windows based software I have and use daily - Fireworks and Photoshop - run using Wine.
For games I have a multitude of game systems.
I'm not daft enough to use apple products (but the OH's iPod library can be edited in Ubuntu).

Why would I use an OS that costs money, is susceptible to viruses and has more bugs than any RC version of *buntu when a free option exists that works perfectly for me. Having said that, I'd still use Ubuntu if canonical charged for it.

Of course, if you need software that can only run on Windows then of course, you need windows (just to answer my proposed question above).

A bit of background first. I first tried Ubuntu back in early 2008. I had an aging laptop, and wanted to see if Ubuntu would let it run much faster than Windows. I installed as a dual boot, because Quicken and Turbotax wouldn't run in Linux, and also because Open Office could not match MS Office exactly. (I'll come back to this in a moment.) The install went in easy and clean, and I liked toying around in Ubuntu. I like to tinker, and a new OS was fun to play with. Boot time was much faster in Ubuntu than Windows. Unfortunately, I tried for quite some time to get the wireless card to work, and never could. That was the end of my first experiment.

Several years later, new computer, I ran both Ubuntu and Mint from flash and CD drives. (This was my only computer. I was just a bit paranoid partitioning the hard drive, and didn't like that it isn't easy to change the default OS at startup to Windows rather than Ubuntu.) Again, superior boot times, and fun to play with. I was very impressed with how far Ubuntu had come from a couple years earlier in terms of setup. I would use Linux for some web surfing and games, but would always have to revert to Windows for Quicken, Turbotax and Office. We are told that we may be able to run in Wine or whatnot, and this or that will "mostly" work. Frankly, there's the problem. I don't want to sacrifice. I don't want "mostly", and I don't want to use a free program that lacks the functionality of something like Quicken (Yes, Intuit pisses me off, but there is no good alternative). With work documents, I can't run the risk of altered formatting and other issues by using an Office alternative. I eventually stopped running Ubuntu because I kept on having issues with the flash drives and got sick of creating new ones.

Obviously, people have a litany of other issues installing and running Linux. One need only go to these forums to see that. Netflix, choppy video, webcams, etc. seem to be consistent issues. I do think for many people, an OEM install of Ubuntu or a another build would work fine, with the possible exception of printers. Because many hardware manufacturers don't build with Linux in mind, they can be a problem, although I do think things have come a long way there. Anyway, I think for a lot of household users, and Ubuntu machine would be fine.

I'm trying to decide whether to dual boot my machine now. I have a brand new laptop running Windows 8, and I'm considering dual booting my old one as a second backup machine. I'm sitting here wondering why I would do that. Be interesting if I did and ended up liking it more than my W8 machine.

Max Blyss
June 4th, 2013, 04:19 AM
Preference. That's all. They both get things done just fine, but Linux in general just gives you more accessible options. I think it's more fun.

Swappiness
June 10th, 2013, 08:45 AM
I chose Ubuntu over Windows because XP was running way too slow and I like that fact that I can run apps as root. But frankly I was just sick of using a dated crappy OS. I wanted something new and I wanted my laptop to boot faster. Unlike Linux distros Windows XP did run very fast on the laptop I'm using even though it should have been running faster than it was with the hardware.

COMPUTER SPECS

Toshiba Satellite M100

Intel Centrino T1350 1.86GHz CPU 32bit (I've read that this is upgradable)
Intel 945GM x86/MMX/SSE2 graphics
VGA output
P/S2 keyboard/mouse connection
Synaptics Touchpad
XD/SD card slot
2.2GB RAM (1 slot on bottom and 1 under keyboard, adding another 2GB in a week or 2)
a measely 60GB HDD (soon to be upgraded with 500GB or maybe even 1TB)
4 USB 2.0 ports (1 x left, 1 x rear, 2 x right)
mic and headphone jack front with volume dial
802.11g Wi-Fi and Bluetooth using the same switch
and a few useless bits that aren't worth mentioning.

It's not a bad computer. It does what I want it to do and that's all that matters.

monkeybrain2012
June 10th, 2013, 12:29 PM
I chose Ubuntu over Windows because XP was running way too slow and I like that fact that I can run apps as root. .

Maybe I misunderstood something, why do you want to run applications as root??

ZTiger
June 12th, 2013, 03:27 PM
For the sanity of us all I must do this.

I hear-by invoke Godwin's Law (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Godwin%27s_law)

Hitler would use Windows...

(If you do not under stand the humor of this statement and it's intent then I'm sorry. It's purpose is meant to kill a thread that should have died log ago. It was started in August 16th, 2005 for crying out loud.)

howefield
June 12th, 2013, 03:32 PM
Invalid invocation.

The thread continues... :)

jaccav
June 12th, 2013, 04:18 PM
For the sanity of us all I must do this.

I hear-by invoke Godwin's Law (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Godwin%27s_law)

Hitler would use Windows...

(If you do not under stand the humor of this statement and it's intent then I'm sorry. It's purpose is meant to kill a thread that should have died log ago. It was started in August 16th, 2005 for crying out loud.)

The thread is as valid today as it was in 2005. One of the things I like about the Ubuntu forums is that you can get straight answers from people. While many posters prefer Linux over Windows, opinions over the two OS do not take on the tone here that it does elsewhere on the web. Here, there seems to be an understanding that probably 90% or better of computer users will never upgrade their operating systems or add hardware that will require driver searches, and want to use something they are used to that works out of the box.
The closer all Linux flavors come to doing that, the more usage will grow, especially if the cost of a new machine is lower because the user isn't buying it with Windows.

In too many other places on the web, commenters lash out at Windows users as if they are prostituting their daughters, often overstating the virus risks and acting as if new hardware, such as printers, is never plug and play with Windows. My actual experience has been that it is Linux, not Windows, that has more plug and play issues. Remember, the 90% of people are not going to want to figure out how to get a wireless card to work. I understand this isn't a Linux issue per se. Linux distros suffer because they are all a bit different. A hardware vendor can build for Mac and Windows much easier than every flavor of Linux. I think this is the same issue that takes place with apps for Android phones. It is easier for developers to build for iphone first, because there is one flavor. With a multitude of different Android devices, it complicates development and testing.

Anyway, I really appreciate the candor of folks in the thread when they say it really comes down to preference. There are pluses and minuses to each OS, and people will have to choose accordingly.

I do think I'll dual boot my old machine. I do like to tinker, and I'm anxious to see what's changed since I last tried Ubuntu.

peyre
June 12th, 2013, 07:54 PM
For the sanity of us all I must do this.

I hear-by invoke Godwin's Law (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Godwin%27s_law)

Hitler would use Windows...

(If you do not under stand the humor of this statement and it's intent then I'm sorry. It's purpose is meant to kill a thread that should have died log ago. It was started in August 16th, 2005 for crying out loud.)

I understand the humor intended, but there's no reason to kill this thread. People here are enjoying talking about why they choose Ubuntu over Windows; it's a very relevant subject in the Linux world. Besides, on a technical note...given that today, China is using its own Linux distro, it seems likely Hitler would have done similarly.

Also, that should be "hereby" and "its".

liruiradiant
June 14th, 2013, 07:13 AM
I'm a biology student and I need Perl, Python and other scripts to help me analysis data so I'm using Linux

Michaelocalypse
June 15th, 2013, 07:46 PM
I needed a new computer. I don't do well with Mac computers (and they're expensive). I don't like the newer Windows Vista/7/8 stuff. I was looking into trying Linux when I saw a good deal on a new desktop with good specs, with Ubuntu installed, so I ordered it. It's got enough resources to dual boot XP if I want (and may need to for some engineering programs).

twizter
June 28th, 2013, 12:03 PM
can i be directed to where i can get help for installing wiin 7 on another drive for dual booting please (i am sooo green)
I have loaded the install cd and tried to boot from cd as i would do with win but get boot manger error

AxelVK
June 29th, 2013, 04:11 PM
I am starting to ask myself why I chose Linux over Windows. People say "try Linux, its great". I did and I can't find answers to problems. Asked here in these forums and only got one response which didn't work. Searched and found some other suggestions but none has worked so far. To be honest, I'm a little disappointed with the Linux experience. Part of the problem for me is that a lot of people who is genuinely trying to help seem to assume that everyone already knows Linux inside out and knows how to install packages, deal with install and permissions issues, check logs and interpret messages, etc. Some people won't like me saying this but that has been my genuine experience with Linux. I will try and persist with Linux but so far it hasn't been a great experience. As a total noob with a big N, I need detailed instructions how to do things rather than "use this utility" or "install that". Perhaps there need to be a another forum for even more beginning beginners than the Absolute Beginners. Like a Total Complete Idiots forum.

prodigy_
June 29th, 2013, 04:55 PM
Here, there seems to be an understanding that probably 90% or better of computer users will never upgrade their operating systems or add hardware that will require driver searches, and want to use something they are used to that works out of the box.
The closer all Linux flavors come to doing that, the more usage will grow, especially if the cost of a new machine is lower because the user isn't buying it with Windows.

Most people don't know what advantages Windows can actually offer over Linux (or vice versa). They simply keep using whatever was pre-installed on their devices when they bought them. MS knows that so they mostly ignore Linux and focus on retaining their iron grip on OEMs.

And you can't really cure computer illiteracy with user friendliness. We need to admit that, while operating systems are friendlier than ever, the ability of regular users to perform the simplest tasks is at all time low. People tend to ignore even the obvious clues and do something completely illogical. They can read but they don't. They can think but they don't want to. They can use Google but they're too lazy.

peyre
June 29th, 2013, 06:36 PM
I am starting to ask myself why I chose Linux over Windows. People say "try Linux, its great". I did and I can't find answers to problems. Asked here in these forums and only got one response which didn't work. Searched and found some other suggestions but none has worked so far. To be honest, I'm a little disappointed with the Linux experience. Part of the problem for me is that a lot of people who is genuinely trying to help seem to assume that everyone already knows Linux inside out and knows how to install packages, deal with install and permissions issues, check logs and interpret messages, etc. Some people won't like me saying this but that has been my genuine experience with Linux. I will try and persist with Linux but so far it hasn't been a great experience. As a total noob with a big N, I need detailed instructions how to do things rather than "use this utility" or "install that". Perhaps there need to be a another forum for even more beginning beginners than the Absolute Beginners. Like a Total Complete Idiots forum.

FWIW, there is and Absolute Beginners section on Ubuntu Forums.

Your concerns are understandable. Linux has a reputation as a community whose members are very technically oriented and skilled and have little patience for those without that knowledge. I haven't found that to be true of Ubuntu forums though. I've gotten help here on a number of issues--though on the other hand there have been several issues where, like you, I got little or no help. Still, I have to remind myself sometimes that the folks here are volunteers.

Also, while it can sometimes be hard to get support for Ubuntu (especially since I use a variant, not Ubuntu itself), I'm not sure I could get much better support for Windows without paying $300 for a support call.

One thing I can say with confidence is that Linux isn't for everyone. It's an enthusiast's operating system, and like an enthusiast's anything, it will have devotees who sing its praises--often exaggerating its virtues and leading some to try it and they find it isn't (for them) all it's cracked up to be. I recall years ago, this guy kept telling me how much better Linux was. I tried it and told him some of the disappointments I had with it, and he looked at me with a "Ha, gotcha!" look and said flippantly, "Well, it's not Windows." I could have strangled him. So sometimes we have to deal with people like that.

Also, switching to Linux comes with a bit of a steep initial learning curve. There are a lot of things we take for granted in
Windows because there's no choice in the matter. Desktop environments for instance (Gnome, Xfce, etc.)--there's only one desktop environment in Windows (per version), so it never comes up--but in Linux you have to pick one, and some support questions will be desktop-environment specific. Also partitions are a bit different because there are no drive letters. And so on. I'm a Windows professional myself, and Linux took a while to get used to. It's still slightly harder to use than Windows, but I'm very glad I've expanded my knowledge into a second OS.

aysiu
June 30th, 2013, 01:37 AM
I am starting to ask myself why I chose Linux over Windows. People say "try Linux, its great". I did and I can't find answers to problems. Asked here in these forums and only got one response which didn't work. Searched and found some other suggestions but none has worked so far. My experience has been the exact opposite. I have to support Windows as part of my job, and it's often difficult to find answers to problems in Windows... or you find about six or seven answers without anyone definitively saying "Yes, this is confirmed to work" or "No, this is confirmed not to work." At the end of the day, though, it's really not about any platform being better or worse than another. Just use what works best for you. If Windows works better for you, use Windows. If Linux works better for you, use Linux. Or Mac. Or ChromeOS. Or FreeBSD. Or whatever.

su:bhatta
June 30th, 2013, 10:43 PM
I hate to use pirated OS which leads to pirated software then slow systems due to idiotic virus protectors...

I dual boot, But do not touch Windows ... have the latest 8 installed tho'....
I also love the customizations...

Beautymist
July 1st, 2013, 10:54 PM
Most people don't know what advantages Windows can actually offer over Linux (or vice versa). They simply keep using whatever was pre-installed on their devices when they bought them. MS knows that so they mostly ignore Linux and focus on retaining their iron grip on OEMs.

And you can't really cure computer illiteracy with user friendliness. We need to admit that, while operating systems are friendlier than ever, the ability of regular users to perform the simplest tasks is at all time low. People tend to ignore even the obvious clues and do something completely illogical. They can read but they don't. They can think but they don't want to. They can use Google but they're too lazy.

@prodigy_: well said!

Actually, I intend to make a living out of my acquaintances' (and strangers') digital illiteracy. :biggrin:

I'm no computer wizard, but I've been using computers (Mac, PC with win then linux since 1999) during my workday since... 1989!

After some trial and error (of course), I think I learned quite a lot. I am in no way a computer engineer, but i'm computer literate and my mission is to help out all the digital iliterates out there, and to make a living out of it, too!

My biggest issue with microsoft is the fact they brainwashed people into believing their "click & play" utopian (advertising) message. There is no such thing as "click & play" - computers are like a new language, and you have to learn it or at least RTFM a bit so you can use your computer with some efficiency!

I am literally surrounded with people who bought a computer because it was affordable/fashionable/sounded like a good idea at the time - except they use less than 5% of said computer abilities!

Sad, but true.

After helping friends for free for years, I have decided it's gonna be my next job - make a living out of teaching basic computer literacy to the clueless masses.

Oh, and to clarify my message: i will teach people to use their Windows-based computers, while enjoying my linux at home!

-BM

BR8
July 9th, 2013, 02:05 AM
I'll try to summarize the major reasons to choose Linux in general over propietary operating systems:

-it costs nothing
-it's available for anyone to look at the source code, allowing for more in depth help and customization
-it's less prone to the few viruses designed for it
-there are many programs that are very similar in functionality, allowing you to choose precisely what you want in many cases
-it can be tried from a CD or Flash Drive so you can choose the best option before editing your hard drive
And there are many more that could be considered subsets of these.

mickee384
August 1st, 2013, 06:50 PM
I was an avid Windows user, dutifully buying each new version of the OS. I had dabbled in Linux (puppy Linux) ,and Windows 8 was coming out. I have a HP Touchsmart PC, and Windows 8 would have worked well on it. I don't know, other than the fact that I bought an Apple laptop, which replaced my Puppy Linux laptop, I decided to jump into Ubuntu with both feet. The touch screen works, but don't really like tons of fingerprints on my screen. I switched 'cold turkey' and don't miss Windows. I use Virtualbox to run the software for my kobo reader and my Zune HD. That's all. Everything else is pure Linux. My partner, whose 68, had a bit of trouble for a week or so, but now is fine with the switch.

No infections, free upgrades, tons of free apps. Total control over customization. Nothing else to say! The best there is. love it! :cool:

cbeal5816
August 1st, 2013, 06:57 PM
Because I enjoy the freedom of the Open-Source world...

d0006
August 5th, 2013, 08:45 AM
Ah likes Gnu/Linux 'cuz ah kin does whut ah wants! If'n ah wants ta uninstall a program, ah kin! Winderz ain't lettin' me uninstall sum HP bloatware an ah hates it! A pox on BillGatus of Borg!

markfknight
August 5th, 2013, 11:14 PM
Ubuntu is much nicer to develop on, you learn more, the tools provided at the end of a simple text command still boggle my mind and its really interesting watching people adjust it to their own needs.

It not one persons vision, its anybody's and everybody's.

steve6
January 19th, 2014, 11:26 PM
In short, less BS to deal with and much more stable. Did I mention that the user has more control over what is going on (ie: network inbound and outbound)

I just love it.

Only downside so far being, expensive engineering programs like: Solidworks and Autodesk Inventor dont seem to work without an innitial DOS based enviroment.

handysmurf
January 22nd, 2014, 07:15 AM
I paid $495 for borland c++ compiler, probably $100 (+) for quattro pro, and several others, PLUS more for anti-virus for use with windows 98.
had some compatibility issues when upgrading to XP, and windows 7 is not "backwards compatable". So now I'm supposed to shell out bigger
buckets of money so the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation can donate all MY money so "everyone can be a productive member of society" (read SLAVE!)
Yes, please keep buying M'soft products. With each iteration having less functionality, and more overhead, we're headed back to the stone-age.
(well actually that may not be such a bad idea.)

No... Instead, I just had the tatoo "SUCKER" removed from my forehead, and am happily downloading FREE programs, with ubuntu, that bundles
the absolute best office software, that have FREE tech support, and not some $180 per hour paid tech support that are slightly better than the "deaf leading the blind".
Make mine hot, and black, no cream, no sugar, and no BS!

Dragonbite
January 22nd, 2014, 02:41 PM
I paid $495 for borland c++ compiler, probably $100 (+) for quattro pro, and several others, PLUS more for anti-virus for use with windows 98.
had some compatibility issues when upgrading to XP, and windows 7 is not "backwards compatable". So now I'm supposed to shell out bigger
buckets of money so the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation ...

How many of those programs you use in Linux are also available for Windows?

I know probably not all of them, but on my Windows system I run LibreOffice, Firefox and Thunderbird in part because they are free (as in beer), free (as in freedom) and consistent with what I use in Linux as well.

folgers
February 2nd, 2014, 08:03 PM
I have been given old hardware. I have five PCChips M810L v 7.1a with 1 GB of RAM running a single core 32bit Athlon 2000+. With the TV Time linux application and TV tuner cards three of these are now my television sets and general entertainment centers for each bedroom. The others are for general pupose use, such as the one I am using now.

Many of my friends have old hardware. When they buy new equipment for the latest Windows, I see it as an opertunity to load Ubuntu on their old computer as an introduction to an alternative to Windows. I ask them what they need to do, then deck it out to meet their requirements.

ralph-beeby
February 4th, 2014, 03:50 PM
I'm sure I won't be the first person to cite this reason, but I've managed to revive a lot of old laptops for my folks using various versions of Ubuntu. Some of these computers have got seven or eight years on the clock, and their original WinXP install is knackered - some run unbearably slowly, others just BSOD within seconds of logging in. Using a Knoppix Live disc, I was able to back up all their important files, and then with a fresh install of Ubuntu, these machines are back up to speed. Ubuntu 10.04 has proven to be fairly user-friendly, and my folks are quite happy with it.

Me? Both my PCs are now dual-boot and, like a lot of others on here, I only keep Windows around for a handful of games I still like to play, and some old recording software that will only run on an old WinXP setup. But if I get the time to learn how to use Ardour, Jack, Calf etc. properly, the latter's days may be numbered!

davidallenbauer
February 4th, 2014, 06:55 PM
The Web is powered by Unix

ShakiestNerd
February 11th, 2014, 10:22 PM
I dual boot Ubuntu and Windows (there are still a few items that require keeping Windows). I have targeted my software Ubuntu to only the applications that contribute to my primary tasks. As a result, when I'm in Ubuntu, I am better able to stay focused on the things I'm working on. Ubuntu's basically uncluttered interface and speed helps keep me on track.

Duhg
February 16th, 2014, 07:42 AM
I had a Windows XP update that was interrupted and caused a blue screen error. No matter what I did, I could not access my C: drive. I was told by 2 techs that I would have to send it in to be recovered at a cost of $600 +. I even bought a external enclosure to access it with my win7 laptop. It saw the drive, but still couldn't access files. I installed Ubuntu in trial mode and low and behold, if I couldn't see all the files that Windows wouldn't let me see. I transferred the files off the drive, reformatted the drive, installed Ubuntu and still having problems installing Windows fron the restore disk. So, this computer will be running Ubuntu full time, and I will be installing Ubuntu on my laptop beside Win7 when I am sure I won't be wiping out any files.

knpoe
February 23rd, 2014, 03:18 PM
cause it doesn't suck ... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EZuY7weXGBc&list=UUp96ZY8o33IYroQHjmwBf1g&feature=c4-overview lol :P

monkeybrain20122
February 24th, 2014, 02:14 AM
Actually i also choose Ubuntu over other Linux after trying different distros. It is by far the smoothest in terms of hardware compatibility, available of software and ease of use. Even compiling from source is easier in Ubuntu than say Fedora because dependencies are often missing in the latter and need to be compiled as well or if you are lazy and lucky (or unlucky) you may be able to find the missing rpms from dubious places. Often things work out of the box with Ubuntu (or just requiring minor tweaks) it is a major pain in some other distros (Debian comes to mind) usually I do manage to get them working, Linux is Linux but just need a lot more work.

I should add that I am not the kind of users who just use Ubuntu for web surfing and listening to music. I do quite a bit of stuffs on my computers and Ubuntu wins hand down over the others.For specific tasks there may be better or comparable distros but overall I have yet to find anything that can replace Ubuntu in the Linux world.

shaunthesheep
April 22nd, 2014, 06:47 PM
I duel boot Windows 7 and Ubuntu Studio but I now use Ubuntu 99% of the time. The Snowden revelation about Microsoft collaboration with the NSA (http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/jul/11/microsoft-nsa-collaboration-user-data)was the last straw for me. The news that MS informs the NSA about vulnerabilities in Windows before they are patched so that it can exploit them to hack into computers confirmed my worst suspicions.

Software transparency is essential. Open source is still no guarantee against surveillance malware because it can be very subtle and easy to miss but there is at least the possibility that it can be audited by any programmer which is not the case with closed source software.

To hell with closed source software.

Dragonbite
April 22nd, 2014, 07:01 PM
I duel boot Windows 7 and Ubuntu Studio

With pistols, or swords? ;)

LastDino
April 25th, 2014, 05:49 PM
Well, it's open source and for my needs it's more than enough as far as functionality goes, not really a hard choice.

Johnny3
April 25th, 2014, 06:34 PM
I duel boot Windows 7 and Ubuntu Studio but I now use Ubuntu 99% of the time. The Snowden revelation about Microsoft collaboration with the NSA (http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/jul/11/microsoft-nsa-collaboration-user-data)was the last straw for me. The news that MS informs the NSA about vulnerabilities in Windows before they are patched so that it can exploit them to hack into computers confirmed my worst suspicions.

Software transparency is essential. Open source is still no guarantee against surveillance malware because it can be very subtle and easy to miss but there is at least the possibility that it can be audited by any programmer which is not the case with closed source software.

To hell with closed source software.

They left out Apple, Google, facebook etc. I don't trust our government at all.
GB Johnny333 67+++ Fl.

Dragonbite
April 25th, 2014, 07:03 PM
They left out Apple, Google, facebook etc. I don't trust our government at all.
GB Johnny333 67+++ Fl.

Even Linus was approached regarding NSA spying. He may have said "No" but he shook his head "Yes" about being approached. I don't remember if he said anything about including something or not though. His father, however, did say that since it was open source it COULDN'T include a back-door.

suprleg
April 26th, 2014, 06:20 AM
I'm sure it's been stated many times before, "because I can". We still do have some freedom to make our own choices.

stozz2
April 28th, 2014, 12:15 PM
Steam is well know by a lot of hardcore gamers, and its now available in the Software Centre for download.
Since 2005 Ubuntu has evolved quite well... and is a great alternative to XP witch is no longer supported by Microsoft, witch is a bit of a problem if your a hardcore gamer using steam.
Not only that surfing the net using microsoft its a bit of a land mine experience.

Dragonbite
April 28th, 2014, 04:33 PM
While Ubuntu is a great alternative to Windows XP, but the competition is now against Windows 7 and Windows 8. Before discounting Windows 8, remember that Ubuntu is moving in much the same fashion with Unity and the work on mobile and touch devices.

pfeiffep
April 29th, 2014, 11:54 PM
I don't want to pay money to be abandoned ... ever heard of Microsoft Money?? Years of using it and keeping it upgraded and then it just vanashed - OK they made a deal with Quicken - but how about us end users.

At least when I'm using free software I don't feel like I've been totally shafted when the company stops support!

Dragonbite
April 30th, 2014, 01:32 PM
I don't want to pay money to be abandoned ... ever heard of Microsoft Money?? Years of using it and keeping it upgraded and then it just vanashed - OK they made a deal with Quicken - but how about us end users.

At least when I'm using free software I don't feel like I've been totally shafted when the company stops support!

Good idea because even Cloud is not a guarantee. I'm still bummed by Google Reader and still waiting for Google Drive for Linux.

Warren Hill
April 30th, 2014, 02:04 PM
While Ubuntu is a great alternative to Windows XP, but the competition is now against Windows 7 and Windows 8. Before discounting Windows 8, remember that Ubuntu is moving in much the same fashion with Unity and the work on mobile and touch devices.

Ubuntu isn't just Unity there are several other desktops available.

Windows 8 is horrible right now because it's made major changes to the user interface and I can't find what I'm looking for. No doubt in time I'll get used to it and it will annoy me less.

Why do I choose Ubuntu over Windows?

1. No viruses

2. Easier to keep up to date.

3. I can choose a desktop I like: gnome-session-flashback

4. All the software I want is free (as in liberty and beer)

5. If a program doesn't do what I want it to I can get the source code and modify it.

The only reason I have a Windows PC at home is to update the Maps on my Sat Nav. It gets used two or three times a year.

Should Ubuntu change anything

Make the Amazon and other dash plug-ins an option you can install then enable rather than one you can disable / remove.


Other than that I'm pretty happy.

Dragonbite
April 30th, 2014, 04:37 PM
5. If a program doesn't do what I want it to I can get the source code and modify it.


Have you actually done that?

pfeiffep
April 30th, 2014, 04:54 PM
Good idea because even Cloud is not a guarantee. I'm still bummed by Google Reader and still waiting for Google Drive for Linux.
Grive and Insynch offer reasonable Google Drive solutions

Dragonbite
April 30th, 2014, 05:39 PM
Grive and Insynch offer reasonable Google Drive solutions

Alternatives, but Google promised and have yet to deliver.

Meanwhile, it means there is little difference, file sync-wise, between Google Drive and other services.

Warren Hill
April 30th, 2014, 10:30 PM
Have you actually done that?

Yes

but then again I'm a developer as a Job so it shouldn't be too much of a surprise.

I've also submitted patches for bugs in Ubuntu. They haven't all been accepted but a few have.

StudioFreq
September 22nd, 2014, 08:07 AM
Fun to read this thread... I use windows 7, Mavericks, and Ubuntu, pretty much daily (front end developer). Ubuntu is my main dev machine, after a year and a half with it, I started liking it more than OSX, which I never thought would happen. If and when you ever start hardcore using command line tools, you begin to see how 45 years of expertise (if your counting unix's contribution), has in refining them. I can't explain it, it's like trying to tell someone how awesome vi is when all they've ever used is MS Word. All the countless contributions made to Unix/Linux, by thousands of users who did it for free out of love for their craft counts for a lot for me. Linux has a soul. As far as distros go, Ubuntu is gentle on most neophytes, easy to use package manager, easy to setup, easy to upgrade, and has most everything you need out of the box. Even My mother in law uses it ;)

Michael_McKenney
September 22nd, 2014, 03:31 PM
My main workstation will be Windows 7 x64. I have too much invested in CAD and A/V software to switch completely to Ubuntu on that box. Now my other two workstations are Ubuntu. My web server was moved to Ubuntu at home because it was easier than Fedora Core 7 to configure. I just switched by Tape backup box with 3 tape drives at home to Ubuntu from XP Pro x64. XP Pro x64 was killed off by Microsoft. I need a way to backup my 130 GB web site and Windows 7. I started configuring Bacula over the weekend. Tar works good on the tape drives. Still figuring out how to backup Windows 7 with Tar till Bacula is working.

Dragonbite
September 22nd, 2014, 04:06 PM
I choose Ubuntu Server for my server rather than Windows because of price ($$$) and familiarity. I am more comfortable connecting via SSH to the box for making changes and setting configurations.

Another thing I find very beneficial and promotes me to using Linux is that the documentation available for Linux (and Ubuntu specifically) enables me to have an understanding what I am doing and to some degree "why" without having to read some college-level thesis, a dumbed-down or poorly written tutorial or otherwise be told "I should know that already" (if I am asking about it, I obviously don't know ..). And then there are the forums!

It doesn't mean I know everything I am doing (or understanding everything), but I am learning, poking and getting it to "work" somehow ;). I am actually getting a lot of my information from an Ubuntu Server 10.04 book and a Raspberry Pi book.

Another great thing is that if something doesn't work, I copy off whatever files I want to preserve, and overwrite the drive and try again! That is, until I start getting familiar with VMs and can snapshot and revert from snapshots when something breaks (files located elsewhere, of course).

StudioFreq
September 23rd, 2014, 02:54 AM
Yep. The vast majority of the web is served with linux. Almost all my boxes are CentOs. And once you start looking, you see it everywhere (my router and phone come to mind). Learn to use linux, and you open doors to a lot of places; I use rsync to backup data off my webserver, and move data the other way to pickup music and movies from my home system, say when I'm visiting family on the east coast. When you get an idea for some fancy home automation thing you want to do, throw in a rasberry pi, and tool with it to your hearts content. The skills and knowledge transfer.

Obviously, if you need Photoshop, or want to play some PC game, there's not much you can do, but outside of that, I just see no value in actually really learning the OS. What would be the point? I like windows, there's nothing wrong with it, but it's nothing more than a vehicle to run someone else software when I can't run it on Ubuntu. However, the reverse is not true.

help_me2
September 23rd, 2014, 03:01 AM
I use Ubuntu because it runs better and faster than windows. It's free. I dislike microsoft. I like the open source approach to things. Ubuntu does everything I need.

EngieOP
September 23rd, 2014, 05:07 PM
Because
sudo apt-get install.

jakeyramasama
September 24th, 2014, 04:05 AM
it is just so easy to use, and allows far more tweaking and customisation tools. it also runs faster than my windows installation. (dual-boot)

Mike_Walsh
September 25th, 2014, 03:47 PM
I switched back in May, after nearly 13 years of Windows XP. I'd got used to it, and was fairly comfortable with it.....but I was fed-up to the back teeth with the constant BSODs and crashes, and the regular re-installs. I was ready for a change.

I Googled 'free operating systems', after fruitlessly trying to find a way in which I could get hold of a free copy of Windows 7. It's impossible, because the UK government arm-twisted the IPs over here into blocking all the torrent sites 3 or 4 years ago. I found the Ubuntu web site almost straight away; and after looking it over for a few minutes, I figured it couldn't hurt to give it a try. I haven't looked back since.

Three things I like about it, in preference to Windows.

1) No need for A/V.
2) No registry to clog up.
3) The biggest one of all (for me); multiple workspaces. With graphic design being a hobby, and using several different pieces of software for various different aspects, it just makes more sense to open each one in a separate screen.....and it's SO much easier than constant minimizing/maximizing to the taskbar.

I understand MyCrudSoft are only now considering multiple workspaces in the upcoming Windows 9. I'm honestly not surprised Windows 8/8.1 has turned out to be another Vista.....that Metro interface is AWFUL. I think if I sat my six-year old great-niece in front of one of my graphics apps, and just said to her 'Play around with it , and see what happens', well; I think she'd come up with an improvement, that's for sure..!


Regards,

Mike.

Michael_McKenney
September 25th, 2014, 04:03 PM
Both Linux and Windows have their markets. Windows comes with all new computers sold. Manufacturers create optimized drivers for Windows. Linux is not supported because it is free. It costs money to get factory drivers. The benefit of Ubuntu is cost. Free. Is it faster on hardware? Not always. Depends on your hardware and the drivers. Windows costs money to own because of Microsoft development costs. People like to be paid. At work in my Data Center, my vendors are 100% Microsoft only. I need help with a Microsoft OS issue, I can open a support call with the vendor or Microsoft. Now if you compare Linux Enterprise with Microsoft. Cost is about the same per year. I looked into it. Bacula Enterprise was $2600 a year for software and support. Symantec and CA Arcserve were $1100 a year.

oliverjames
October 2nd, 2014, 01:08 PM
I've been using (X)ubuntu in place of Windows XP for the last 6 years. The advantages:

Far easier to install and maintain,
Performs better, particularly on old hardware,
Looks better,
More secure,
Far less expensive.