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siciliancasanova
December 15th, 2007, 08:45 AM
Bungo Pony just started the worst programming language (http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=641120) thread. So I figured I would start the opposite one.

I just missed the age of learning all these older languages. So from my relative perspective of what I've used, I would say Ruby.

ericesque
December 15th, 2007, 09:06 AM
ActionScript :-\"

*buckles up*

popch
December 15th, 2007, 09:09 AM
Favorites:
IBM/370 Macro and Assembly Language
Forth
Logo
Prolog
Smalltalk
REXXBest:
Prolog

blastus
December 15th, 2007, 09:16 AM
None. They all suck, it's just that some suck less than others. They all lack the ability to model real world entities and their complex relationships.

popch
December 15th, 2007, 09:47 AM
They all lack the ability to model real world entities and their complex relationships.

I have used Smalltalk and Prolog to model real world entities and their complex relationships. In fact, I have also used COBOL to do that. Actually, you can use nearly any programming language to do that. It is not a matter of the language but of knowledge. Where's the problem?

mips
December 15th, 2007, 11:31 AM
Assembly language. Especially on the 680x0

ExpatPaul
December 15th, 2007, 12:01 PM
Some languages are better suited to some tasks than others, but there isn't a "best" programming language as such since it depends on what you are trying to do.

darkoptix
December 15th, 2007, 12:10 PM
Well it is obviously VBA... duh

agemon
December 15th, 2007, 01:04 PM
Some languages are better suited to some tasks than others, but there isn't a "best" programming language as such since it depends on what you are trying to do.
I agree, It also depends on your programing skills, for example if you're new, you could try QBasic or Python, after you acquire some experience you can try using languages like C++.
IMHO C++ and Python are a great team, because C++ is very good at number crunching and is one of the fastest programing languages, however it lacks (by default) file-manipulation, internet data handling (email, download, TCP/IP etc), cryptographic functions, it isn't so OS aware and so on. And that's where Python comes is ;)

Locutux
December 15th, 2007, 01:11 PM
I'd vote for C! :)

subs
December 15th, 2007, 03:04 PM
JAVA all the way!!:guitar::guitar::guitar:

forrestcupp
December 15th, 2007, 03:12 PM
For speed, assembly

For ease of use, Visual C#.

Lster
December 15th, 2007, 03:18 PM
Assembly, C and Python! Each for different uses.

Mazza558
December 15th, 2007, 03:19 PM
Python Ftw.

Luggy
December 15th, 2007, 04:01 PM
IMHO C++ and Python are a great team, because C++ is very good at number crunching and is one of the fastest programing languages, however it lacks (by default) file-manipulation...
#include <fstream> ?

Tundro Walker
December 15th, 2007, 08:06 PM
You have to qualify the idea of "best" and "worst" from a standpoint. I mean, which is the best/worst from a technical stand-point, or from a user stand-point, or the computer's standpoint?

Obviously, from a computer standpoint, Assembly machine code would be ideal...less time translating higher-level code down to lower level machine code.

From a technical stand-point, the lower-level languages are probably the best in terms of flexibility and performance. Lots of folks know C can create very powerful, fast programs that can interact with the computer at the hardware-level if need be. But, you have to crank out a lot of code, or some really, really fancy code in order to do things that only take one or two lines in higher-level languages.

So, from a user stand-point, I personally think it depends on if you're a right-brainer or left-brainer, how much interest you take in learning the technical side of programming, and what your goals are with programming and computing.

Some folks like to learn programming as an end in and of itself. They just get giddy about learning languages and doing things with them, because that's what intrigues them.

Personally, I'm a creative right-brained type. I don't consider myself a programmer, and I don't program just for the shear joy of programming. I do it as a means to an end, and end that is usually creative and has me doing something more right-brained...like music, art, etc.

So, I find it very difficult to program in things like C, Perl, even the CLI of Linux. The syntax is cryptic to me. You have to memorize lots of abbreviations and symbols. I found it frustrating, because my goals are not to learn a language because I'm interested in its technical nuances or how fast it is, or whatever.

With that in mind, I've found Visual Basic and Python to be very good. They handle a lot of the "technical" stuff (memory management, garbage collection) that I really don't want to learn about or spend time writing code about. I mean, doing it all yourself in C means you have absolute control. But, I have better things to do with my life, like focusing on my creative task. Having to worry about memory management and such when writing a program is like your parents coming into your room and telling you to stop playing your game (when you're at a really good part) and go take out the trash. It's annoying and interruptive. I suck at maintenance...I'm good at creativity. So, I like languages that handle the maintenance, letting me focus on my creative task.

Also, the syntax is more "human" readable, so I can quickly understand what's going on just by looking. Again, I don't want to get impeded from my creative task by having part of my brain's overhead translating between what I want to do into some cryptic programming syntax. That's brain power I could be spending focusing on my creative task.

So really, best/worst is a matter of perspective.

For right-brainers, though, I'd say Python (maybe Java) is a good place to start.

For left-brainers, they might want to jump into Perl, Ruby, or even C++.

klange
December 16th, 2007, 05:18 PM
Python.
Python does everything!

angryfirelord
December 19th, 2007, 03:55 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L33t_(programming_language)