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Bungo Pony
December 15th, 2007, 07:59 AM
What was the worst programming language you've ever used?

Mine was probably Logo - a programming language designed for kids :rolleyes:. I got more use out of using INPUT A$ in BASIC than telling that damn "turtle" which way to move. Drawing a square was just so much easier using plain old ASCII characters instead of using four lines of code.

HermanAB
December 15th, 2007, 08:02 AM
*Nothing* beats Texas Instruments Assembly Language.

Lostincyberspace
December 15th, 2007, 08:04 AM
Binar. Almost impossible to use nowdays for programing.

Compyx
December 15th, 2007, 08:09 AM
Visual Basic.

Gustav
December 15th, 2007, 08:10 AM
*Nothing* beats Texas Instruments Assembly Language.

:mad:

Texas Instruments Assembly Language is my favorite language by far (maybe not for actual programming useful things but for writing code). It's beautiful, much better looking than the other assemblys, and the technical limitations makes it a joy to program.

You never get the same feeling of accomplishment when programming in most other languages.

For a really useless programming language look at Brainf*ck (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brain****) :).

Kingsley
December 15th, 2007, 08:19 AM
:mad:

Texas Instruments Assembly Language is my favorite language by far (maybe not for actual programming useful things but for writing code). It's beautiful, much better looking than the other assemblys, and the technical limitations makes it a joy to program.

You never get the same feeling of accomplishment when programming in most other languages.

For a really useless programming language look at Brainf*ck (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brain****) :).
Wow...


++++++++++
[>+++++++>++++++++++>+++>+<<<<-] The initial loop to set up useful values in the array
>++. Print 'H'
>+. Print 'e'
+++++++. Print 'l'
. Print 'l'
+++. Print 'o'
>++. Print ' '
<<+++++++++++++++. Print 'W'
>. Print 'o'
+++. Print 'r'
------. Print 'l'
--------. Print 'd'
>+. Print '!'
>. Print newline

Tundro Walker
December 15th, 2007, 08:38 AM
Oh, man...I remember that LOGO language. What a pain. Instead of teaching us real skills on a computer, like how to format a drive, or use a spreadsheet / word processor, etc, they made you input coordinates for that damn turtle. What a pain.

I think the second useless one was BASIC, but that was only because of the way it was taught to me. The teacher had us make block art with it, and it was such a pain, too.

Kept getting stuck with teachers in the 80's that didn't know squat about computers, and they were supposed to teach the kids how to use them. Ugh...

Erdaron
December 15th, 2007, 09:04 AM
This is probably colored by personal experience too much, but Turbo Pascal has caused me more frustration that just about anything ever. I've borrowed a book from a friend. I bought a book on my own. I've spent countless hours pouring over its documentation. And several months later I just gave up. I couldn't go on.

In fact, I just looked it up on Wikipedia, and screenshots of the thing felt like something stabbing me in the eyes.

I've since worked with Python and C++, and while I wasn't awesome, at least I felt like I was making progress. So at least I know it's not just my ineptness.

popch
December 15th, 2007, 09:12 AM
BASIC (any variant); PHP; DOS/Win command line

gvoima
December 15th, 2007, 09:12 AM
Turbo Pascal
Think you mean just Pascal.. Turbo Pascal is a programming environment not a language ;)

But speaking of languages, I'm not really a Basic fan.

siciliancasanova
December 15th, 2007, 09:13 AM
BASIC (any variant); PHP; DOS/Win command line

I agree with the PHP sentiment. I dislike it considerably.

jinx099
December 15th, 2007, 10:02 AM
Scheme

saulgoode
December 15th, 2007, 10:22 AM
INTERCAL (http://www.muppetlabs.com/~breadbox/intercal-man/home.html#10) :)

Though for GENUINE languages, Python.

Lster
December 15th, 2007, 03:17 PM
BBC BASIC, which I am currently learning for my computer science course. It has so many flaws. I am used to C and Assembly and have been programming in them for years so this is rather a back step. But my CS teacher still insists I use BBC BASIC...

Nekiruhs
December 15th, 2007, 03:55 PM
INTERCAL (http://www.muppetlabs.com/~breadbox/intercal-man/home.html#10) :)

Though for GENUINE languages, Python.
What did you find so bad about Python? Semantic whitespace? I personally find it to be the language I like most and am best at. Its a beautifully simple and clean language.

Speaking of whitespace, Whitespace (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whitespace_(programming_language)) is my least favorite language.

Luggy
December 15th, 2007, 04:06 PM
The worst language I have used would probably be VHDL.

klange
December 16th, 2007, 05:21 PM
Visual Basic.

Back in my days of Windoze, I used Visual Basic day in and day out and I'll have you know it was a wonderful tool. Slow as ****, but wonderful none the less.

Now, languages like Whitespace and Brainf*ck, those are a pain to deal with...

The worst programming language I've ever used, though, is Ti-nSpire Basic. There are no input functions, you can't do anything with the graph window, and there is no way to directly output to a point on the screen (a function seen in all previous versions of Ti-Basic)

jken146
December 16th, 2007, 05:33 PM
Whitespace (http://compsoc.dur.ac.uk/whitespace/) lol

phenest
December 16th, 2007, 05:36 PM
I started on a ZX81 using Sinclair BASIC. Back then, BASIC was an acronym: Beginners All purpose Symbolic Instruction Code. Z80a assembly was ok.

Yeah. I think any BASIC language is the pits. Visual Basic especially. Gimme C any time.

compiledkernel
December 16th, 2007, 10:28 PM
Hard toss up there.

The Haskell Language.

or for you database fans.

Visual FoxPro, gah....the absolute worst.

D-EJ915
December 17th, 2007, 11:20 PM
The worst language I have used would probably be VHDL.
oh god...I never had to do any actual programming, luckily they have programs which do it for us.

whitespace is pretty bad, lol

timpino
December 19th, 2007, 08:50 PM
I have used Matlab and i hated it, it just works the complete opposite of what my brain tells me is right. :)

Ludwig Weinzierl
June 21st, 2009, 02:51 PM
A similar question is also discussed at stackoverflow (http://stackoverflow.com/) under the title:

What is the worst programming language you ever worked with? (http://stackoverflow.com/questions/961942/what-is-the-worst-programming-language-you-ever-worked-with)

The answers there cover 98 different languages so far.
Some are amusing, some boring but the majority is quite insightful.

monsterstack
June 21st, 2009, 08:11 PM
I'll just leave this here.

http://i717.photobucket.com/albums/ww177/stuffandstuffand/1235974989974.png

shaloken
June 21st, 2009, 09:16 PM
I think the worst programming language is the brainf*ck.
OMG. Just to talk about it I have chills...
This remembers some bad memory:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brain****
go there to see something who will haunt you for the rest of your life.

SunnyRabbiera
June 22nd, 2009, 12:00 PM
I'll just leave this here.

http://i717.photobucket.com/albums/ww177/stuffandstuffand/1235974989974.png

I like the Katana for Perl, seems to fit it too as Perl is pretty popular with linuxers.
The spoon for visualbasic is a classic though :D

Nashenas88
November 21st, 2012, 05:54 AM
TCL especially with [Incr Tcl] (incr tcl is used to provide OO to tcl, but in a horrible, horrible way).

TCL lets you do this:


set a i
set b f

$a$b {true} {
puts "Seriously"
}

# The same as

if {true} {
puts "Seriously"
}


Incr Tcl's parses sucks. If I have the following code:


# Original block opening {
if {1 < 2} {
puts blah
}


It will tell me I'm missing a closing brace because it FINDS BRACES IN COMMENTS. That one took *months* to figure out.

One of the guys at work also wrote a profiler for the language, and I tried adding class names to the output to figure out where some random variable was being defined.
After *days* of looking for the Incr Tcl C documentation, I finally found it.

Check it out... [incr Tcl] Package C API (http://www.tcl.tk/man/tcl8.6/ItclLib/contents.htm)

My Favorite is the description of "ItclObjectInfo *info (in)" in Class (http://www.tcl.tk/man/tcl8.6/ItclLib/Class.htm)

This led to cases where we would look into the C code of Tcl and Incr Tcl. DON'T DO THAT. Your coding skills will degrade horrendously. I found one file with 42 goto statements in it. It was the same file that had a 1000 line function for converting a string into a double... or was it a double into a string? Either way it's been slowly burning from my mind, which is a good thing.

I would say that brain**** is pretty crazy, but I don't think anyone ever used it seriously in any major project (like the above which was used for a very large (8 million lines of c and tcl :shock:))

oh and I almost forgot the best part. You can rename "keywords" like so:



rename if oldIf
proc if {condition body} {
puts {This is the fake if}
oldIf $condition $body
}


It almost temps me to have done the following:



set hyk i
set tbg f
set byt ex
set nsh it
rename $hvk$tbg tyuh
set p1 F;set p2 A;set p3 T;set p4 L;set p5 { };set p6 E;set p7 R;set p8 O; set p9 {!}
proc $hvk$tbg {c b} {
global p1 p2 p3 p4 p5 p6 p7 p8 p9 byt nsh
tyuh {[expr {rand()*100000000}] == 1} {
puts $p1$p2$p3$p2$p4$p5$p6$p7$p7$p8$p7$p9$p9$p9
$byt$nsh
}
tyuh $c $b
}


What this will do is once every 100 million calls to if, the program will display "FATAL ERROR!!!" and then exit. Doing a search (or grep) for if, fatal, exit or error would never return results in this file :).

All examples can be tested with the tcl shell program "tclsh". I would recommend saving the code to a file, and then calling "source <filename>" (without the arrows) from tclsh. I would recommend changing the rand part to just 1 so you could see it reproduce every time :)

overdrank
November 21st, 2012, 12:20 PM
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