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PartisanEntity
December 11th, 2007, 02:47 PM
I am on the lookout for an application where I can track and chart my weight lifting workout progress.

There are one or two threads here on the forum dealing with this topic:

http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=336337

I have tried out SportsTracker but that is aimed at runners or swimmers (mainly distance sports).

OpenFitness looks good but you have to buy it.

Does anyone know of any open source applications aimed at bodybuilders/weight lifters?

Or how do you keep track of your workouts in a nice and easy-to-view manner with charts etc.. ?

Thanks.

fuscia
December 11th, 2007, 04:11 PM
nano weightlifting

deadlift (list current poundage)

clean&jerk (list current poundage)

snatch (list current poundage)


puked 0=puked 1=didn't puke

LaRoza
December 11th, 2007, 04:17 PM
deadlift (list current poundage)

clean&jerk (list current poundage)

snatch (list current poundage)


That looks almost like my weightlifting schedule, back when I lifted weights. Very effective.

In my opinion, I am a certified personal trainer for what it is worth, religiously tracking numbers leads to overtraining and less effective practices.

If you do a wave cycle for example, your progress will speak for itself each cycle. Just keep a notebook or something that can easily be updated (the wall with chalk, a paper taped to the wall with tally marks, etc) with you when you are lifting.

Tally marks and dates on the wall (or paper taped to the wall) is the most effective method I have seen, and is what I use now.

fatality_uk
December 11th, 2007, 05:00 PM
In my opinion, I am a certified personal trainer for what it is worth, religiously tracking numbers leads to overtraining and less effective practices.

In my opinion, I am a certified slob, weight training is just WAY too much hard work. I mean, if god would have intended us to lift 350KG with a our little fingers, we would all have arms like Popeye! :)

Having said that, I do suggest that a simple OO spreadsheet, with a few well placed functions would be more than enough. From that raw data you can graph, do trend analysis and

My former P.T. instructor Sgt Buttler used a simple spreadsheet to map all of our progress. I don't have a copy but I am sure that it wouldn't be that hard to create and you could adapt it to your personal specification.

fuscia
December 11th, 2007, 05:28 PM
In my opinion, I am a certified slob, weight training is just WAY too much hard work. I mean, if god would have intended us to lift 350KG with a our little fingers, we would all have arms like Popeye! :)

weight training, using compound lifts and lifting as heavily as you can manage, is very little work and very inexpensive. i've got a bar and plates and home and a nice hill next to my house that's great for sprints. working out six days a week, i probably spend about two hours total on it. plenty of time left over to sit on the couch and stare at the ceiling.

LaRoza
December 11th, 2007, 06:14 PM
weight training, using compound lifts and lifting as heavily as you can manage, is very little work and very inexpensive. i've got a bar and plates and home and a nice hill next to my house that's great for sprints. working out six days a week, i probably spend about two hours total on it. plenty of time left over to sit on the couch and stare at the ceiling.

It is even easier using your body weight. The average weightlifting trainer will not be able to do a handstand pushup, or a one arm pullup. Get a kettlebells for swings/snatches/presses and you are all set.

A pullup bar, two kettlebells, and a few square feet and I have a complete gym in my basement.

(That is my routine now)

fuscia
December 11th, 2007, 06:24 PM
i used to think kettlebells were the russian equivalent to amway, but my neighbor (a physical therapist) got one, and even if it's the lightest one, i was still impressed with it. the thing i prefer about a bar is that there is no place to hide from a heavy weight, a good thing for a sandbagger with a history of dogging it.

LaRoza
December 11th, 2007, 06:37 PM
i used to think kettlebells were the russian equivalent to amway, but my neighbor (a physical therapist) got one, and even if it's the lightest one, i was still impressed with it. the thing i prefer about a bar is that there is no place to hide from a heavy weight, a good thing for a sandbagger with a history of dogging it.

I have two 52 pound kettlebells, I assure you, lifting them in a clean and press is MUCH harder than the same weight on a bar. Dumbells work in this regard also.

I was (am) a deadlift fan, and always liked the lifting of 2x my body weight (no belts/wraps/drugs).

fuscia
December 11th, 2007, 06:40 PM
I was (am) a deadlift fan, and always liked the lifting of 2x my body weight (no belts/wraps/drugs).

wraps and belts are for idiots. belts make your abdominal muscles work in the exact opposite way they should and wraps are for people who never plan on picking up something heavy in their yards ("hey, i know! grab it with your elbows!").

i might try a kettlebell.

LaRoza
December 11th, 2007, 06:43 PM
wraps and belts are for idiots. belts make your abdominal muscles work in the exact opposite way they should and wraps are for people who never plan on picking up something heavy in their yards ("hey, i know! grab it with your elbows!").

I never understood the belt concept. Yes, it "works", but it makes you weaker, and makes you prone to injury.

The deadlift is the best abdominal exercise in existance, in my opinion. It works your torso exactly the way it was meant to use. Lets see the crunch junkies compete with a raw deadlifter in real life.

-EDIT Sorry, PartisanEntity for the way the topic has developed, but hopefully you and others will find it interesting.

LaRoza
December 11th, 2007, 06:50 PM
i might try a kettlebell.

It was found that training with kettlebells only resulted in new PR's for the deadlift. The swing is best done with a kettlebell, and is exactly the same as a deadlift (mechanically) but allows for explosive strength, high reps, and is more flexible. I recommend: http://www.amazon.com/Russian-Kettlebell-Challenge-Pavel-Tsatsouline/dp/0938045326

He wrote a new book, but I would recommend this one.

A little propaganda: http://www.russiankettlebells.com/?__utma=1.654740823.1197394920.1197394920.11973949 20.1&__utmb=1&__utmc=1&__utmx=-&__utmz=1.1197394920.1.1.utmccn%3D(direct)%7Cutmcsr %3D(direct)%7Cutmcmd%3D(none)&__utmv=-&__utmk=257017612

http://www.dragondoor.com is where I buy kettlebells (well, both of them). I recommend you get the 52 pounder if you are a physically fit man. It isn't exactly "52" pounds, it may say 53. It is measured in "poods" and is 1.5 poods.

pjkoczan
December 11th, 2007, 07:03 PM
As far as software goes, I just use a spreadsheet.

I track my 1-rep max (1RM), as well as my original 1RM to see improvement, and I also use a formula based off of my 1RM to get the weights for my sets.

e.g. weight = 1RM*(1 - .025*reps - bias for the set #)...It's how I was taught to set up a programs. It works for me and translates well to a spreadsheet.

All I do is update my 1RM each week in the spreadsheet (by 2-5 pounds depending on the exercise and how well I did). 5 minutes a week and I have a new workout plan.

fuscia
December 11th, 2007, 07:33 PM
i can mostly do without pavel's 'comrade this' and 'comrade that' routine. i like the 'grease the groove' idea, but i'm not sure that's his. playing with my neighbor's bell was convincing enough. but, if i have to choose between a kettlebell and more plates (i only have 305lbs. worth of weight now), i'll probably go for another 100lbs. of plates and shoot for a 405 deadlift. i like deadlifting and would rather do that, just from the fun aspect. i'll give it some thought, for sure.

matthewcraig
December 11th, 2007, 07:37 PM
What's wrong with buying software that supports Linux and Ubuntu? Help build a Linux developer community when you build your body, by helping to pay a Linux developer's salary. In return, you will get commercial-level support for the software, about which you are asking for support here.

PartisanEntity
December 11th, 2007, 08:19 PM
What's wrong with buying software that supports Linux and Ubuntu? Help build a Linux developer community when you build your body, by helping to pay a Linux developer's salary. In return, you will get commercial-level support for the software, about which you are asking for support here.

I do not intend to purchase such software. It would be nice to have,
But it is not something I need and hence I would not pay for it.

Now to get back on topic. I do not train at home since I have no space for a gym, so I am a member of a gym down the road. I work out three times a week. I used to keep a log book and used it to document my progress, I did this for about three years. Then I stopped keeping track of my workouts (mainly because the book was full and I was too lazy to buy a new one).

Recently I thought it might be a good idea to start keeping track again and so I was wondering if there were any nice tools.

LaRoza
December 11th, 2007, 09:19 PM
i can mostly do without pavel's 'comrade this' and 'comrade that' routine. i like the 'grease the groove' idea, but i'm not sure that's his. playing with my neighbor's bell was convincing enough. but, if i have to choose between a kettlebell and more plates (i only have 305lbs. worth of weight now), i'll probably go for another 100lbs. of plates and shoot for a 405 deadlift. i like deadlifting and would rather do that, just from the fun aspect. i'll give it some thought, for sure.

Pavel's books are very overpriced, and physically of low quality, however; the information is first rate.

My space constraints make continuing deadlifting difficult, so the compact, efficient kettlebells are perfect for me. Pavel also wrote a book, Power to the People, which is all about deadlifting basically.

I want to go back to dead lifting, but until I have the space (and a strong floor) I cannot.

Lostincyberspace
December 11th, 2007, 09:30 PM
I took weight lifting in high school and had to stop on the dead lift when we ran out of weights(well over 600 pounds) I have been trying to find a a bar with a larger weight space but haven't really tried to hard.

fuscia
December 11th, 2007, 09:35 PM
I took weight lifting in high school and had to stop on the dead lift when we ran out of weights(well over 600 pounds) I have been trying to find a a bar with a larger weight space but haven't really tried to hard.

try adding chains. the weight gets heavier the more the bar comes off the floor. you could also lift while standing on a box. suitcase deads are another option.

evil316
December 11th, 2007, 09:35 PM
I wouldn't mind having a weight training tracking program either as I have a home gym in the room next to my computer room. I'm a muscled geek. ;) I'll see what I can dig up and post back.

LaRoza
December 11th, 2007, 09:41 PM
@Lostincyberspace

For deadlift options, try the one handed deadlift or the one legged deadlift.

With one hand, you can straddle the bar, or lift it like a suitcase. Remember not to lean! It is a great grip and ab exercise.

Witht the one legged deadlift, the muscles of the legs get a great workout, as does your abs. If you had 600 pounds available before, don't think you'll be able to do this with 300!

Lostincyberspace
December 11th, 2007, 09:49 PM
wow thanks for all the input I never thought my little post would get this much of a response

evil316
December 11th, 2007, 09:50 PM
Here are some things I dug up:

http://www.saring.de/sportstracker/index.html

http://pytrainer.e-oss.net/

http://www.gnomefiles.org/app.php/gtrainer

http://packages.debian.org/unstable/utils/kipina

http://www.openfitness.net/

That's what I found after a quick google. I couldn't access some of the sites due to being on a govt computer....Shhhh.

Other options would be to find a web based application or find something for windows and try to run it with wine.

LaRoza
December 11th, 2007, 09:52 PM
wow thanks for all the input I never thought my little post would get this much of a response

No problem! Dead lifting was a fun experience for me, and I will start again in the future when I have the space.

The use of chains and other forms of deadlifts are really effective, not only for the regular deadlift, but for overall strength.

Lostincyberspace
December 11th, 2007, 09:57 PM
About the chains is there any thing special to do with them or do i just take and loop them over the bar a couple of times and lift.

evil316
December 11th, 2007, 10:36 PM
another link

http://www.download32.com/open-fitness---mobile-edition-d21252.html

evil316
December 11th, 2007, 10:45 PM
You can run this with openoffice. Speadsheet to track weight lifting.

http://www.runningdeersoftware.com/products/muscletrac.htm

fuscia
December 12th, 2007, 08:47 AM
About the chains is there any thing special to do with them or do i just take and loop them over the bar a couple of times and lift.

attach the middle of the chains (same number of chains on each side) to just inside the collar. as you raise the bar, more of the chain will come off the floor, increasing the weight as you lift. it's a good way to add more tension to the top part the lift.