PDA

View Full Version : History of Linux since 1910



vasiliymeshko
December 8th, 2007, 05:26 AM
Had some fun time looking at this http://www.google.com/views?hl=en&q=+linux+view:timeline&vwdr=1910%20-%201911&sa=N&ct=tlhist

LookTJ
December 8th, 2007, 05:28 AM
incorrect, the correct link is http://www.google.com/views?q=linux+view%3Atimeline&btnGt=Search&hl=en

been around since the 90s.

GrahamOtte
December 8th, 2007, 06:00 AM
hooray 4 linux

LookTJ
December 8th, 2007, 06:06 AM
I see what you did, you set a filter.

Lostincyberspace
December 8th, 2007, 06:45 AM
Most of it is things talking about kernel versions and it mistakes it as a European date.

DoctorMO
December 8th, 2007, 10:01 AM
European date.

What the hell are you talking about? there is no such thing as a "European date". Not only are the standard dates long hand (Wednesday 5th January 3004) but their in completely different languages; when shorted they were all in completely different forms. in the uk for example it's common to see DD/MM/YYYY

But that is nothing to the idiotic day in the middle and date as fractions you have to put up with in the usa; 4/7 is NOT a date, 4/30/2001 is just daft.

For all of these reasons the ISO date format was created and amended a few times:

YYYY-MM-DD[THH:MM:SS[.PPPP][TMZ]]

We can't keep going around pretending it doesn't matter that we're using incompatible formats; eventually every country will just have to use iso, metric and other _standards_.

rowanparker
December 8th, 2007, 12:06 PM
What the hell are you talking about? there is no such thing as a "European date". Not only are the standard dates long hand (Wednesday 5th January 3004) but their in completely different languages; when shorted they were all in completely different forms. in the uk for example it's common to see DD/MM/YYYY

But that is nothing to the idiotic day in the middle and date as fractions you have to put up with in the usa; 4/7 is NOT a date, 4/30/2001 is just daft.

For all of these reasons the ISO date format was created and amended a few times:

YYYY-MM-DD[THH:MM:SS[.PPPP][TMZ]]

We can't keep going around pretending it doesn't matter that we're using incompatible formats; eventually every country will just have to use iso, metric and other _standards_.
+1

Well said!

original_jamingrit
December 8th, 2007, 03:50 PM
It's just the google timeline. I read http://mashable.com/2007/10/26/linux-powering-your-pcs-since-1910/ which showed up in the timeline, which explained the same thing. The google timeline expects strange things from numbers.