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red_Marvin
December 7th, 2007, 03:54 AM
"Due to unverifiable media license authentication, the most common audio and video file types cannot be shared with different users using WD Anywhere Access."

I've heard that wd mybook performance on linux is somewhat flaky, but I believe this would make most even more reluctant to purchase one.

http://blog.wired.com/gadgets/2007/12/western-digital.html
http://wdc.custhelp.com/cgi-bin/wdc.cfg/php/enduser/std_adp.php?p_faqid=1495&p_created=1168641440&p_sid=bLTfVJLi&p_accessibility=0&p_redirect=&p_lva=&p_sp=cF9zcmNoPTEmcF9zb3J0X2J5PSZwX2dyaWRzb3J0PSZwX 3Jvd19jbnQ9NSw1JnBfcHJvZHM9MCZwX2NhdHM9MCZwX3B2PSZ wX2N2PSZwX3NlYXJjaF90eXBlPWFuc3dlcnMuc2VhcmNoX2Zub CZwX3BhZ2U9MSZwX3NlYXJjaF90ZXh0PS5hdmk*&p_li=&p_topview=1

There seems to be workarounds, and even then I guess it wont matter for most linux users, as the software is windows only, but personally I will avoid them from now on by principle.

-grubby
December 7th, 2007, 03:57 AM
I thought they made hard drives..
EDIT: oops, didn't even check the link, nevermind
EDIT1: oh yah, I should also mention that I'm using an 80GB Western Digital HDD and it has yet to fail despite the fact that it's at least 3 years old

ryanVickers
December 7th, 2007, 03:59 AM
I don;t know anything about the company modern-day, but I have a WD 8Gb drive from a good 10 to 15 years ago and it's working like a dream - fast, reliable, and it's been through some very harsh load :p (reformatting, and assigning drive lables, etc numerous times. It's also survived a lightning strike and 3 motherboard failures :D)

DirtDawg
December 7th, 2007, 04:10 AM
Yeas that's pretty bad. I give WD money for their product, not to be babysat.

That said, I have a 250 Gig iBook that works fine under Linux.

ryanVickers
December 7th, 2007, 04:17 AM
seriously! It survived a lightning strike, 3 motherboard failures, and a short-circuit due to technicians leaving a screw in the case under the MB (that's what did in the 3rd one ;)). On top of that, It's been reformatted, drive labels changed, etc multiple times and it's doing great! :D

man, that 3rd one, there was smoke like, just holy crap! lol And it stunk!!!

akiratheoni
December 7th, 2007, 04:20 AM
Hmm... a company with DRM motives but yet produces high-quality drives (I got an 120GB external three or four years ago and it has no signs of failing... that's why I got a 500GB myBook or whatever it's called)... well, I'm split on who to support >.<

toupeiro
December 7th, 2007, 05:51 AM
I used to swear by western digital hard drives .. then it seemed the last 5 I bought in a row all failed within a year. I've come to rely on Maxtor for being the drive that simply lives. I still have the first Maxtor drive I ever bought; a 540MB drive that still works and has no bad sectors.

When I want a performance 10K or 15K drive, I will take a Seagate.

Western Digital may have fixed some of their QA issues, but I won't ever know it because I won't ever buy one again based on my experiences.

wana10
December 7th, 2007, 06:22 AM
number one reason to not buy western digital? seagate. better drives, better price.

realized my post could come off as rather inflammatory and decided to expand a little. i had a bad experience with wd, bought a mybook and had it crap out within a month, supposedly due to power issues. wd refused to do anything. since then i've bought a seagate external and internal. both have had no problems, despite a couple power-outages. my next harddrive? seagate, no question

SunnyRabbiera
December 7th, 2007, 06:38 AM
Yeh segate is who I deal with, they have great hard drives, external and internal

newbie2
December 7th, 2007, 12:56 PM
my next harddrive? seagate, no question


Seagate snubs Linux

Latest drives show no visible means of support
http://www.theinquirer.net/gb/inquirer/news/2007/12/06/seagate-snubs-linux
:rolleyes:

koleoptero
December 7th, 2007, 01:01 PM
I have bought an external My Book 320GB, but usb, and I gave it a nice low level format the moment I plugged it in to remove all the useless files it had by default, so no problems like those. I always prefer usb external drives to anything else.

OffHand
December 7th, 2007, 01:28 PM
I just bought a My Book drive the other day. It mounts as a generic HD. What is the fuzz about? Is it an application or something that comes with the drive?

gn2
December 7th, 2007, 03:33 PM
I will avoid them from now on by principle.

Have you looked at getting a Linksys NSLU2 "Slug" ?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NSLU2
http://www.linksys.com/servlet/Satellite?childpagename=US%2FLayout&packedargs=c%3DL_Product_C2%26cid%3D1118334819312&pagename=Linksys%2FCommon%2FVisitorWrapper
http://www.nslu2-linux.org/

akiratheoni
December 7th, 2007, 03:46 PM
number one reason to not buy western digital? seagate. better drives, better price.

That's interesting, I got an 500GB internal Seagate from Best Buy before I got my WD, and it was DOA... after I pretty much wasted my time with it, I was able to get a refund and get the WD and I haven't looked back since.

mips
December 7th, 2007, 03:57 PM
Nothing wrong with WD hard drives.

Why would you install the client software in the first place ?
You also have the option to go the SAMBA route with no hassles.

public_void
December 7th, 2007, 04:04 PM
Have a WD 320GB External hard drive, came formatted in FAT32. Works perfectly as a common storage between Windows and Linux.

ryanVickers
December 7th, 2007, 04:45 PM
just so everyone knows, Seagate now owns so many other companies, like for example, Maxtor ;)

toupeiro
December 7th, 2007, 05:04 PM
just so everyone knows, Seagate now owns so many other companies, like for example, Maxtor ;)

Paper and production are two different things :) Believe me, I've worked for big name companies that got bought out 3 and 4 times over in my tenure and it never changed production, just who cuts the check.

If seagate owns maxtor, I still feel good that in that circumstance both companies put out quality drives and my money isn't going to waste.

red_Marvin
December 7th, 2007, 06:04 PM
It seems that I have to withdraw my "flaky performance" statement (that's nice of course), it was based on some reviews I read when I were hunting for an external drive myself.

But that wasn't the point of the thread.

The main reason I posted was that I feel that the tech business is moving in a very bad direction when it tries to impose this kind of limits on how the hardware is used, it shows the same kind of attitude towards the user and what the user is, as when some isp's decided that blocking bittorent traffic would be a good idea.

That the manual describes an alternate (samba) way of accessing the drive that would not restrict the user in this way does not cut it, imo, simply because it's not the recommended way.

wana10
December 7th, 2007, 08:38 PM
http://www.theinquirer.net/gb/inquirer/news/2007/12/06/seagate-snubs-linux
:rolleyes:

i've got a pushbutton backup (http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/products/external/pushbutton_backup/) drive. sure it may not look as sleek but its never failed me.


That's interesting, I got an 500GB internal Seagate from Best Buy before I got my WD, and it was DOA... after I pretty much wasted my time with it, I was able to get a refund and get the WD and I haven't looked back since.

if you read the rest of my post i do say that this is based on personal experience...

sr20ve
December 7th, 2007, 09:53 PM
I work for a certain tech support department and I probably see about 5-10 failed hard drives every day.

Most failed hard drives I see are correctable with firmware updates, but among all those failed drives, I'd say the most common drives I see failed are: Maxtors, Western Digitals and Seagates.

From what I've seen, IBM, Fujitsu and Hitachi have the lowest failure rates and almost never have firmware updates.

gn2
December 8th, 2007, 12:07 AM
I work for a certain tech support department and I probably see about 5-10 failed hard drives every day.

Most failed hard drives I see are correctable with firmware updates, but among all those failed drives, I'd say the most common drives I see failed are: Maxtors, Western Digitals and Seagates.

From what I've seen, IBM, Fujitsu and Hitachi have the lowest failure rates and almost never have firmware updates.

What about Samsung? I've always found Samsung hard drives to be very reliable and quiet in use.

ryanVickers
December 8th, 2007, 12:12 AM
wow, I didn't even know they made hard drives... lol
I have a Toshiba one as well... :p

Majorix
December 8th, 2007, 12:12 AM
To add to the OP, I have a 500gb WD MyBook and it went kaputt on me a few weeks ago. There was absolutely no reason for it to, it was standing right there without anybody or anything touching it, and it suddenly started not to work. I brought it to the repair service, they said that I could probably take it back in 1 week. In the end of 3 weeks, they gave me a brand new MyBook, and as you can guess, all my files were gone. I just don't get it, and I wouldn't recommend WD MyBook to anyone.

OffHand
December 8th, 2007, 12:15 AM
To add to the OP, I have a 500gb WD MyBook and it went kaputt on me a few weeks ago. There was absolutely no reason for it to, it was standing right there without anybody or anything touching it, and it suddenly started not to work. I brought it to the repair service, they said that I could probably take it back in 1 week. In the end of 3 weeks, they gave me a brand new MyBook, and as you can guess, all my files were gone. I just don't get it, and I wouldn't recommend WD MyBook to anyone.

The same could have happened with any other device and you should really make a backup of your data.

btw... I do not have a preference for a specific brand so I am not biased.

sr20ve
December 8th, 2007, 12:27 AM
What about Samsung? I've always found Samsung hard drives to be very reliable and quiet in use.

Honestly, I hardly ever even see Samsung hard drives, failed or not failed, so I really can't make a determination based on my experience.

Maybe someone else has more experience with Samsung drives?

gn2
December 8th, 2007, 12:37 AM
Honestly, I hardly ever even see Samsung hard drives, failed or not failed, so I really can't make a determination based on my experience.


Perhaps the fact that you never see them indicates that they are reliable ? :D

ryanVickers
December 8th, 2007, 12:38 AM
Perhaps the fact that you never see them indicates that they are reliable ? :D

Or that no one has them :p

gn2
December 8th, 2007, 12:42 AM
Or that no one has them :p

Possibly, that had occurred to me.
I have an 80gb Samsung that has been spinning every day for the last four years.
They can be more difficult to find than other brands, but the build quality is fantastic.

23meg
December 8th, 2007, 12:52 AM
* adds WD to boycott list *

Sef
December 8th, 2007, 01:24 AM
From the New York Times (http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2007/12/07/more-on-wds-hard-drive-that-wont-share-video/index.html) (7 December 2007):


The file blocking is not in the hard drive itself but in an Internet file sharing service called Mio that is included with the drive. This service, Mionet , which was acquired by Western Digital earlier this year, has two aspects: It lets you connect to your own files from anywhere on the Internet. And it also lets you specify certain folders that you can share with your friends.

mips
December 8th, 2007, 11:01 AM
I work for a certain tech support department and I probably see about 5-10 failed hard drives every day.

Most failed hard drives I see are correctable with firmware updates, but among all those failed drives, I'd say the most common drives I see failed are: Maxtors, Western Digitals and Seagates.

From what I've seen, IBM, Fujitsu and Hitachi have the lowest failure rates and almost never have firmware updates.

I agree on the Maxtors, the Seagate & WD I think is because there is simply so many of them out there compared to IBM, Hitachi etc. which sell in way lesser volumes.

OffHand
December 8th, 2007, 11:56 AM
From the New York Times (http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2007/12/07/more-on-wds-hard-drive-that-wont-share-video/index.html) (7 December 2007):

The file blocking is not in the hard drive itself but in an Internet file sharing service called Mio that is included with the drive. This service, Mionet , which was acquired by Western Digital earlier this year, has two aspects: It lets you connect to your own files from anywhere on the Internet. And it also lets you specify certain folders that you can share with your friends.

Although I think that it is kind of lame to block certain file types I do not have a problem with it. The program is an extra, not what I bought it for and I won't use it. I haven't tried using it with ssh yet, but I am sure I won't have a problem getting it to work.

AndyC_772
December 8th, 2007, 04:58 PM
Another vote for Samsung drives here. I've been running a couple of 160GB drives in my Tivo for a couple of years now with no problems at all, and they're whisper quiet too. Previously I used Maxtor drives but, running 24x7 in a warm environment used to wreck about one a year.

I have a Samsung in my laptop now too - also totally reliable so far and much quieter than the Hitachi it replaced.

FYI the only Seagate drives with a problem seem to be the Freeagent Pro series, which are quite 'intelligent' and contain the offending power-down feature. I have three FreeAgent (non-'Pro') drives and they're just totally generic USB 2.0 units with no 'nasties' to report at all. I use them with my Linux based file server to keep nightly backups and never had a problem.

mips
December 8th, 2007, 08:21 PM
I actually went out and purchased a 500GB WD MyBook Essential Edition to backup my 2x160GB WD desktop drives & my 40GB Seagate laptop drive.

Works a charm, just formatted it to get rid of whatever they put on it.