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View Full Version : Has any linux n00b asked where C:\ and stuff are?



master5o1
December 4th, 2007, 11:51 PM
Has any linux n00b come in and asked for C:\ and D:\ and stuff because there linux hasn't found there hard drive (C and/or D)...

heh...

stoodleysnow
December 4th, 2007, 11:54 PM
Oh, yes. THOSE NOOBS.
The ones condemned to a life of ignorance and stupidity for, no matter how many times you tell them, they still won't be able to grasp even the most simple differences.
:shudder:
:(

~LoKe
December 5th, 2007, 12:12 AM
When I first used Linux (Linspire/Lindows, unfortunately), I could not for the life of me find the equivalent to "Program Files". I knew it would be entirely different, but I could not find it. Curse you, /usr/bin!

qazwsx
December 5th, 2007, 01:05 AM
I always hated those damn letters c:\ :evil:

I didn't realized what I was missing before I installed wine
Yes, there are plenty of n00bs who has asked it.

rune0077
December 5th, 2007, 01:13 AM
When I first used Linux (Linspire/Lindows, unfortunately), I could not for the life of me find the equivalent to "Program Files". I knew it would be entirely different, but I could not find it. Curse you, /usr/bin!

Yeah, me to. Say what you will of Windows, but at least they make it easy for you. I mean "Program Files", that makes perfect sense. /usr/bin on the other hand, makes very little sense at all, almost like you're not supposed to find it.

boast
December 5th, 2007, 01:21 AM
When I first used Linux (Linspire/Lindows, unfortunately), I could not for the life of me find the equivalent to "Program Files". I knew it would be entirely different, but I could not find it. Curse you, /usr/bin!
I still cant.

thank god for 'locate'

aimran
December 5th, 2007, 01:37 AM
I have a very vague idea where programs are located. But I can't be arsed to know exactly where things are because they differ from distro to distro.

Wait till I build my own LFS!:guitar:

2cute4u
December 5th, 2007, 01:47 AM
WTF are C:\ and D:\ ?

igknighted
December 5th, 2007, 01:56 AM
Yeah, me to. Say what you will of Windows, but at least they make it easy for you. I mean "Program Files", that makes perfect sense. /usr/bin on the other hand, makes very little sense at all, almost like you're not supposed to find it.

See, thats the problem. Windows is easy for someone to pick up the first time, sure. But what about the power users who actually care about where program files is and don't just use the menu's? These people are stuck typing out c:\Program/ Files\App/ Name\program.exe instead of the much simpler /usr/bin/program.exe. This is a very petty example, but it points out a huge difference... linux is designed to be efficient once you learn it, while windows tries for universal competency at the expense of making life harder on power-users. Given the origins of the two I'm not surprised (linux was built by geeks, for geeks and is just now starting to branch out, while windows brought the PC to the masses), but I'm glad a power-user oriented OS like linux is out there, because I want /usr/bin over C:\Program/ Files\ any day.


WTF are C:\ and D:\ ?

LOL! Think mount points, but you don't get as much choice. I forgot this after being with linux for a year as well, then I was mapping netware drives on windows PCs at work and had to relearn it real quick lol.

perce
December 5th, 2007, 02:59 AM
/usr/bin on the other hand, makes very little sense at all, almost like you're not supposed to find it.

In fact you are not suppose to temper with them, and if an unexperienced user starts to play with that directory he's almost surely going to do some disaster.

picpak
December 5th, 2007, 03:11 AM
I remember panicking when I first switched because I couldn't find D:\.

raul_
December 5th, 2007, 03:14 AM
windows file structure just gives you the illusion that you know where things are ;) Someone ever tried deleting a program simply by deleting it's folder? Try it then....oh screw it, i'll cut the suspense: It doesn't work :o

perce
December 5th, 2007, 03:25 AM
And have you ever tried to look for a file in the Windows partition from Linux? If you do, you'll see how a mess things are.

raul_
December 5th, 2007, 03:27 AM
Not to mention those shady " $$$$2344523324$$$ " folders.

I think they're scary

Lostincyberspace
December 5th, 2007, 04:00 AM
Not to mention those shady " $$$$2344523324$$$ " folders.

I think they're scary

I just delete those.

new2*buntu
December 5th, 2007, 04:03 AM
Not to mention those shady " $$$$2344523324$$$ " folders.

I think they're scary

:lolflag: me too

frup
December 5th, 2007, 04:11 AM
I'm sure I did... I didn't ask where I asked what the equivalent was. /dev/ + hda1 hda2 hdb1 etc was the answer and this seemed much more logical especially after I figured out /dev/ meant devices. The way the system mounts a drive or partition where ever you want also pleased me.

Xzallion
December 5th, 2007, 05:14 AM
I think we shouldn't lump everyone into the "n00b" category and instead realize that anyone new to linux should at least think this, and most of us that first switched asked this.

Most people only get a chance to experience Microsofts Windows, while a few get to see an Apple Macintosh. But the Majority of people will get a windows computer. In every version of Windows as far back as I can remember the drives always corresponded to a drive letter, and to use it you had to know that files installed to "C:\" while "D:\" was probably your cd or dvd drive. As they advance and learn a few things they would find they could have other partitions etc, and they would begin to learn the "inner workings of a computer." Unfortunately this was actually the inner workings of Windows, and not the actual computer but most people try to teach themselves and this is the conclusion they usually come across by trial and error.

Now once they decide they are of a high enough tech level to try a different operating system such as linux, they think they will be able to do all right because they have learned so much. Unfortunately so little translates directly to linux that they resort to "learning the basics" which in the windows world was learning what "C:\" and "D:\" were.

They aren't n00bs for asking this, they are newbies trying to learn. Now they can become n00bs based on their response, especially if they say something like "Well that's retarded." I personally hate it when people phrase their dislike for something in that manner but that would be a n00b response.

Just my two cents.

rune0077
December 5th, 2007, 05:37 PM
In fact you are not suppose to temper with them, and if an unexperienced user starts to play with that directory he's almost surely going to do some disaster.

I know, but it's just so darn irresistible to do it anyway :). SOmebody says "don't touch this", and first thing I do is reach out and touch it. Oh well, curiosity hasn't killed this cat ... yet!

igknighted
December 5th, 2007, 05:43 PM
I think we shouldn't lump everyone into the "n00b" category and instead realize that anyone new to linux should at least think this, and most of us that first switched asked this.

Most people only get a chance to experience Microsofts Windows, while a few get to see an Apple Macintosh. But the Majority of people will get a windows computer. In every version of Windows as far back as I can remember the drives always corresponded to a drive letter, and to use it you had to know that files installed to "C:\" while "D:\" was probably your cd or dvd drive. As they advance and learn a few things they would find they could have other partitions etc, and they would begin to learn the "inner workings of a computer." Unfortunately this was actually the inner workings of Windows, and not the actual computer but most people try to teach themselves and this is the conclusion they usually come across by trial and error.

Now once they decide they are of a high enough tech level to try a different operating system such as linux, they think they will be able to do all right because they have learned so much. Unfortunately so little translates directly to linux that they resort to "learning the basics" which in the windows world was learning what "C:\" and "D:\" were.

They aren't n00bs for asking this, they are newbies trying to learn. Now they can become n00bs based on their response, especially if they say something like "Well that's retarded." I personally hate it when people phrase their dislike for something in that manner but that would be a n00b response.

Just my two cents.

There's nothing wrong with being a n00b, we all were before. It's really only a bad thing if you're on the gentoo forums ;). But I really don't think that calling someone a n00b is an insult.

PrimoTurbo
December 5th, 2007, 06:39 PM
I think linux has a very poor filesystem structure, I wish it was made less geeky and more coherent.

shafin
December 5th, 2007, 07:07 PM
When I first switched,I had some problem grasping the idea of linux, but once I've got it,it seems more organized, no hassle with the folders and drives,b e happy with your home folder,and let the system folders rot in /

darksong
December 5th, 2007, 07:08 PM
Wow you called a whole lot of your potential user base dickheads. Well Done.

samwyse
December 5th, 2007, 07:38 PM
I think linux has a very poor filesystem structure, I wish it was made less geeky and more coherent.

What makes you think it's poor and not coherent?

http://www.freeos.com/articles/3102/

I'm not an expert, but how do you rework it without losing functionality and keep it simple as a multi-user system?

Xzallion
December 6th, 2007, 12:20 AM
There's nothing wrong with being a n00b, we all were before. It's really only a bad thing if you're on the gentoo forums ;). But I really don't think that calling someone a n00b is an insult.

Really I'm going off the gamer definition of "n00b", which is best summed up in this comic (http://www.ctrlaltdel-online.com/comic.php?d=20060823).

But in case you don't want to go offsite to see the definition, I generally assume a "n00b" is a person that is not willing to learn anything new or admit that they don't know what they are doing and accept help. A "newb" or "newbie" is just a person that is new to something and willing to learn. So n00b is a really insulting term while newb just means your new to something.

So I wasn't bashing the newbies, or saying theirs anything wrong with them, its the "n00bs" that I don't like.

LaRoza
December 6th, 2007, 12:22 AM
I think linux has a very poor filesystem structure, I wish it was made less geeky and more coherent.

Is it too logical? It is a very simple system, everything is a file, and under /. No need to guess which letter is being used.

samjh
December 6th, 2007, 12:33 AM
When I first used Solaris, I wondered. I never asked anyone though. I just accepted the fact that it didn't have (or need) DOS-style drive letters.

Zoiked
December 6th, 2007, 01:48 AM
Oh, yes. THOSE NOOBS.
The ones condemned to a life of ignorance and stupidity for, no matter how many times you tell them, they still won't be able to grasp even the most simple differences.
:shudder:
:(

I'm pretty sure everyone that started Linux always asked questions similar to the same thing. I sure did! I surely don't see why they should be called noobs, its just pure ignorance because they are a beginners; remember, this is a operating system, not a mmorpg game. Grow Up!

georges023
December 6th, 2007, 02:04 AM
Her...
No.
I never asked where was C:\ and/or D:\ lol :P.
I learned the base of linux faster than the base of windows lol.

But N00b is not an insult in ubuntu term, but in gamer term it is.

toupeiro
December 6th, 2007, 02:07 AM
When I first switched (this is going back some years) I understood the relavence of the directory structure after a short amount of time researching, but what I didn't understand / like is device paths!


"/dev/hd .. holy crap I dont have that many hard drives!!"

oh, I like them NOW, but that was the biggest learning curve for me .. addressing and identifying my system hardware.

Then when you start learning solaris, you get to learn it again! Have a slice!

blu3ness
December 6th, 2007, 02:08 AM
that was my first reaction when I booted up my ubuntu the first time too. Heh, times do change tho. Now I just wish that my widnwos FS could be more organized like Linux... :guitar:

frup
December 6th, 2007, 02:12 AM
I just don't understand why anyone new to the system NEEDS to know these really. You don't have to venture outside your /home dir. Especially with synaptic/apt

The only occasion I need to really is to go to /var/www/ or editing the odd configuration file in /etc/ but again ubuntu has created a system where much of this can be done through the system menu.

I support the idea of having Nautilus/ Konqueror only able to see /home. I think that anything else should be done from CLi. Since most things outside /home/ are owned by root, nautilus offers little use anyway and for those in the know sudo nautilus or the like could offer full ls-al functionality.

toupeiro
December 6th, 2007, 02:17 AM
I just don't understand why anyone new to the system NEEDS to know these really. You don't have to venture outside your /home dir. Especially with synaptic/apt
.

Thats pretty bold.. Generalizing computer usage is what made Windows the operating system it is today...

Zoiked
December 6th, 2007, 02:20 AM
"/dev/hd .. holy crap I dont have that many hard drives!!"

oh, I like them NOW, but that was the biggest learning curve for me .. addressing and identifying my system hardware.

LoL, I remember always trying to click on /dev/hda and getting pissed off because it wouldn't do anything besides ask me what program to open it up with.

rune0077
December 6th, 2007, 02:22 AM
I just don't understand why anyone new to the system NEEDS to know these really. You don't have to venture outside your /home dir. Especially with synaptic/apt


Still, people sleep better at night if they know what's on their computers, and where. Just because I bought a new DVD that i never intend to watch doesn't mean I want some completely stranger coming into my house and hide it in some random drawer. I would much rather place it in the drawer myself, so that, if I some day actually do decide to watch it anyway, I would know where to find it.

frup
December 6th, 2007, 02:26 AM
Still, people sleep better at night if they know what's on their computers, and where. Just because I bought a new DVD that i never intend to watch doesn't mean I want some completely stranger coming into my house and hide it in some random drawer. I would much rather place it in the drawer myself, so that, if I some day actually do decide to watch it anyway, I would know where to find it.

But then it is just exploring for curiosities sake and not for functionality and so what ever the structure is, it shouldn't actually matter.

rune0077
December 6th, 2007, 02:29 AM
But then it is just exploring for curiosities sake and not for functionality and so what ever the structure is, it shouldn't actually matter.

Yeah maybe. Dunno, maybe it's just me being paranoid, but whenever I buy a new computer with Windows preinstalled, first thing I do every time is format the harddrive and install it myself. It's like I said: it's just nice to know what's on your computer and where to find it (even if you won't need it).

toupeiro
December 6th, 2007, 02:31 AM
One day.. you will have to boot in single user mode, or you may install something that completely breaks X. When that day comes, you will understand what it matters, and how easy it can be to bring your system back to a usable state as opposed to windows.

Its as important as knowing about system32, program files, or Documents and Settings on a windows system. Its not just curiosity, its fundamental if you care about the depth of your technical skills moving beyond knowing the gnome menubar.

SonicSteve
December 6th, 2007, 02:50 AM
Has any linux n00b come in and asked for C:\ and D:\ and stuff because there linux hasn't found there hard drive (C and/or D)...

heh...

I think what bothers me the most about this is the sneering tone that comes from this comment.
1. Like a previous user already commented of course they will be wondering where the drive letters are. If they are like me they will have come from 20 years of DOS and windows experience. That means 20 years of C:\ D:\ E and so on. Changing from Windows to Linux is like moving from one culture to a very different culture. You feel very out of place and have no idea where to start.
2. You should be honoured that there are windows users here asking basic questions. Perhaps we could find something else we're good at and laugh at people learning that skill too! You wouldn't laugh at a kid learning a new sport or learning to read. Why should you laugh at people who are interested enough to try to learn something that you could teach them.
3. I agree with those who say n00b is insulting. I came to Linux as a very experienced Windows user, you could even say "Expert". However I was very ignorant to Linux, if I came across this thread when I was first learning Ubuntu it might have been enough for me to say "to heck with those elitests".

I think this thread borders on needing to be closed.

Caffeine_Junky
December 6th, 2007, 02:54 AM
Wow you called a whole lot of your potential user base dickheads. Well Done.

LOL, ..I got a giggle out of this...