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gn2
October 19th, 2007, 04:18 PM
The UK's premier supermarket chain, Tesco are now selling PC's with Linux installed.
http://tinyurl.com/3bugto
http://tinyurl.com/ywj77f

First Dell, now Tesco, does this mean Linux is going mainstream?

bruce89
October 19th, 2007, 04:23 PM
My goodness, these are awfully cheap.

I'm shocked they run the anchient 6.06.

Johnsie
October 19th, 2007, 04:23 PM
Sounds great. Tescos is everyhwere in the UK kind of like Wal*mart is in the US.. Now all we need is Ubuntu in Dixons/Currys and we will be mainstream in the UK.

edit: And yes they are really cheap for new computers. I might buy one :-)

x0as
October 19th, 2007, 04:27 PM
Very cheap, tempted to buy one as a new server.

Ripfox
October 19th, 2007, 04:28 PM
Sorry...how much is this US?

vambo
October 19th, 2007, 04:29 PM
Every little helps :)

They are cheap - might make a brand new Gutsy box :guitar:

rolnics
October 19th, 2007, 04:29 PM
Wow, trust Tesco hey . . . . they are taking over the world!!! And hopefully that might give linux a boost as well, with a PC being sold at that kinda price!

bruce89
October 19th, 2007, 04:30 PM
Sorry...how much is this US?

Double the numbers.

popch
October 19th, 2007, 04:31 PM
less prone to virus attacks - lol

gn2
October 19th, 2007, 04:31 PM
Sorry...how much is this US?

Multiply by two I think.

http://www.xe.com/ucc/

For the UK market, these are very cheap.

x0as
October 19th, 2007, 04:32 PM
Sorry...how much is this US?

around $280.

helliewm
October 19th, 2007, 04:38 PM
Wow brilliant.

Does not compare to my Quad Core though:)

Helen

Johnsie
October 19th, 2007, 04:41 PM
I think it's more aimed at people who would be desktop processing and surfing the web. Would make a nice wee home/web server though too.

gn2
October 19th, 2007, 04:42 PM
Wow brilliant.

Does not compare to my Quad Core though:)

Helen

In the UK cheapest I've seen a Quad-Core CPU is 160 just for the CPU :shock: so you're right, it doesn't compare.

Ripfox
October 19th, 2007, 04:43 PM
$280 is not that cheap for here...about average.

Johnsie
October 19th, 2007, 04:49 PM
.

gn2
October 19th, 2007, 04:49 PM
$280 is not that cheap for here...about average.

For comparison the 139 Celeron Linux PC is 60 cheaper than a similar Windows equipped PC in the UK.

Thats $122 in your money.

curuxz
October 19th, 2007, 04:54 PM
One of my clients got one of these (the windows model) and trust me:

They are USELESS BRICKS, the biggest waste of cash heap of **** computers I have ever seen.

Cheep parts, unbelievably slow as a result.

Don't buy from tesco they make crap.

gn2
October 19th, 2007, 04:58 PM
One of my clients got one of these (the windows model) and trust me:

They are USELESS BRICKS

Interestingly Tesco's website doesn't list a Windows variant of either of the Linux machines on offer, so perhaps there's a mistake somewhere....?

Paul820
October 19th, 2007, 04:59 PM
I would rather spend a bit extra and get a laptop with core duo for 299 http://www.currys.co.uk/martprd/store/cur_page.jsp?BV_SessionID=@@@@1651533839.119280941 0@@@@&BV_EngineID=ccdladdmfidddedcflgceggdhhmdgmj.0&page=Product&fm=1&sm=0&tm=4&sku=120717&category_oid=

x0as
October 19th, 2007, 05:04 PM
I would rather spend a bit extra and get a laptop with core duo for 299 http://www.currys.co.uk/martprd/store/cur_page.jsp?BV_SessionID=@@@@1651533839.119280941 0@@@@&BV_EngineID=ccdladdmfidddedcflgceggdhhmdgmj.0&page=Product&fm=1&sm=0&tm=4&sku=120717&category_oid=

That's more than a bit extra, that's over double the price of the cheapest tesco pc :lolflag:

gn2
October 19th, 2007, 05:04 PM
I would rather spend a bit extra and get a laptop with core duo for 299 http://www.currys.co.uk/martprd/store/cur_page.jsp?BV_SessionID=@@@@1651533839.119280941 0@@@@&BV_EngineID=ccdladdmfidddedcflgceggdhhmdgmj.0&page=Product&fm=1&sm=0&tm=4&sku=120717&category_oid=

That's not bad but it's reconditioned.

A little bit more would get a properly new one: http://www.ebuyer.com/product/128711

Phil Airtime
October 19th, 2007, 05:08 PM
Why do people buy computer equipment from god awful shops like Tesco and DSG (Currys, PC World etc)? They're overpriced and poor quality; you're far better going to a dedicated computer shop.

shad0w_walker
October 19th, 2007, 05:12 PM
Incase you didn't notice very few dedicated computer shops actually sell systems with Linux pre-installed. Give me a nice big list of easily accessible, country wide retailers that sell systems with Linux pre-installed and then you have a case.

proalan
October 19th, 2007, 05:12 PM
Ok so you don't need high hardware specs to run linux but this is nothing more than tesco marketing trying to sell off substandard hardware rather than promoting linux.

shad0w_walker
October 19th, 2007, 05:15 PM
It's no worse than PC world selling off their substandard hardware running Vista. I have been to the world of Vista on a old gen laptop like the ones they keep trying to sell, it's not pretty.

gn2
October 19th, 2007, 05:16 PM
Why do people buy computer equipment from god awful shops like Tesco and DSG (Currys, PC World etc)? They're overpriced and poor quality; you're far better going to a dedicated computer shop.

I bought my son's laptop in Toys'R'us, it's a Medion and has been reliable and excellent for the last three years despite his best efforts...
At the time of purchase it was not expensive for the spec.

He's installed PCLinuxOS on it as Ubuntu 7.04 didn't want to play.

Phil Airtime
October 19th, 2007, 08:26 PM
Incase you didn't notice very few dedicated computer shops actually sell systems with Linux pre-installed. Give me a nice big list of easily accessible, country wide retailers that sell systems with Linux pre-installed and then you have a case.

My local computer shop, Micro Direct, will sell you a system with no OS installed. That means you're not paying for a Windows licence you'll never use and you have a clean system that it's easy to stick Linux onto.

Spot1234
October 19th, 2007, 11:33 PM
The computers aren't very good but they are cheap and will surf the internet, print documents and email your sister in Australia which is all a lot of people want from a computer.
XP wouldn't run very well on that and imagine if you tried to put Vista on one. :lolflag:

One thing is for sure Tesco didn't put Ubuntu on it because they believe in open source software; they did it because its cheaper for them and they think they will get less aftersale grief then they would selling Windows boxes. I can't imagine people who know anything about a computer buying from there but I think a set up Linux system would be better in that case then Windows.

It will be interesting to see if they continue If it works its a good argument against those people that say Linux is too hard for the mainstream.

shen-an-doah
October 20th, 2007, 02:04 AM
That's a hell of a lot of clubcard points!

Phil Airtime
October 20th, 2007, 02:05 AM
I wonder why they went for the 6.06 LTS version rather than the much simpler to use 7.04 or 7.10?

shen-an-doah
October 20th, 2007, 02:11 AM
I wonder why they went for the 6.06 LTS version rather than the much simpler to use 7.04 or 7.10?

Lower system requirements?

I doubt you could get compiz working on those...

mojoman
October 20th, 2007, 04:25 PM
I wonder why they went for the 6.06 LTS version rather than the much simpler to use 7.04 or 7.10?

LTS no doubt.

LanDan
October 20th, 2007, 04:39 PM
those in-between releases with the latest stuff that breakes is not what the average supermarket customer needs, you want something that is stable stable stable....i think that people who worry about system specs desktop effects are not the target audience anyway.

but people will notice the Linux thing as an option while they are shopping for their daily stuff and looking at their brochures wich is a really good point since marketing is still lacking in the Linux department
http://direct.tesco.com/q/N.1999391/No.0/Nr.99.aspx

curuxz
October 20th, 2007, 05:34 PM
Interestingly Tesco's website doesn't list a Windows variant of either of the Linux machines on offer, so perhaps there's a mistake somewhere....?


I ment the budget pc's that tesco sell so no there is defiinately no mistake, they make **** computers.

Dont waste your cash on these

gn2
October 20th, 2007, 05:51 PM
I ment the budget pc's that tesco sell so no there is defiinately no mistake, they make **** computers.

Dont waste your cash on these

At risk of sounding like a pedant, Tesco don't make computers, they just buy them in and sell them.

Should you have a problem with a PC from Tesco, they will replace it or give a refund on production of a receipt.
Instantly and without fuss.

starbase1
October 22nd, 2007, 03:31 PM
Its a very basic computer, but most people only need very basic tasks. Of course it's not for the likes of techies who hang out in forums like this one.

But to get a working PC with applications at all for marginally more than a full XP licence (a non OEM 1), really should start people thinking about the microsoft tax.

I also can't help but wonder what happens if MS push ahead with their plans to withdraw XP as an option entirely. As the hardware spec for Vista is so stupidly high, there will be a huge estate of computers , some quite powerful, for which microsoft products are simply not an option.

They will push the entry level price for MS equipped PC's high enough to provide clear blue water between their bloatware, and the lean mean stuff!

I think the really interesting stuff will be happening in 6 months with the next LTS release of Ubuntu, and the cut off for XP approaching fast. But in the meantime a low price and high street distribution can only be good news for proper software in the UK.

osxcapades
October 22nd, 2007, 03:36 PM
First Dell, now Tesco, does this mean Linux is going mainstream?

No.

Johnsie
October 22nd, 2007, 04:53 PM
If the top companies are selling desktop Linux then the answer is YES. Those companies sell more computers in the the UK than anyone else. Tesco is one of Europes biggest retailers and so is Dell. I know quite alot of people in the UK who are running Ubuntu.

LanDan
October 22nd, 2007, 05:04 PM
it will not be the "big breaktrough" for sure, but then again, that will probably never come.
everything needs it own little ecosystem to survive, for linux thusfar this has clearly been the community's on the NET. the question is if all these little "efforts' by tesco and dell and some small others can create an ecosystem that does not live on the NET alone, it can be your neighbour, your mate from football or anywhere.

bottom line is you need support and people to go to with problems and idea's. its nice to do something new and people are willing to do that but not alone, there's no fun in that.

can Linux survive without the net? how many people in a certain fysical radius do you need to make it viable?

i'm slightly optimistic i must say when looking around

_simon_
October 22nd, 2007, 05:04 PM
These are obviously aimed at people who just want a cheap pc and aren't concerned about bells and whistles or just so strapped for cash that anything will do.

Anyone who knows anything about pc's will always build there own to ensure they get the exact spec they want.

happysmileman
October 22nd, 2007, 06:10 PM
No.

For someone with 0 posts in any support section you sure know a lot about how fast Linux will spread. You don't even need to explain any of your answers, just a simple "no" and we all immediately agree with you?

osxcapades
October 22nd, 2007, 06:23 PM
For someone with 0 posts in any support section you sure know a lot about how fast Linux will spread. You don't even need to explain any of your answers, just a simple "no" and we all immediately agree with you?

The question was not "will Linux go mainstream", it was "is Linux going mainstream".

happysmileman
October 22nd, 2007, 07:01 PM
The question was not "will Linux go mainstream", it was "is Linux going mainstream".

Well sorry then, I guess I misunderstood you, you just seemed to be trolling from what I saw (0 posts, just disagreeing without explaining) though some of your other posts seem useful.

But of course whether it's going mainstream depends on what he meant by that, if by mainstream he meant will it gain a large amount of market share, then no, it isn't going mainstream.
If however, he meant that Linux will soon be supported by much more hardware vendors, and easier to get working, then yes it is going mainstream.

I don't think anyone here expects MS to lose more than 2-3% market share anytime soon, but if I could walk into a shop and get a Linux PC, or even know that Linux will recognise the drivers I'll be happy letting people I know use Windows, as long as I know my choice will be protected.

gn2
October 23rd, 2007, 12:44 AM
Perhaps I should elaborate further.

Tesco are the major high street retailer in the UK.

If they start selling Linux PC's to the non-enthusiast mainstream masses, will it help Linux become a competitive mainstream option?

I think it will.

The cheaper of the two PC's linked to is only 139 which is 60 less than it's Microsoft equipped equivalent.

This is a massive margin at this price point, the difference is much less in percentage terms at the higher end, but most people don't actually need a high spec PC and their purchase is more influenced by price.

These are by far the cheapest PC's I know of on the UK high street.

jgrabham
October 23rd, 2007, 01:30 AM
the 190 one is about what my base unit cost (self built naturally) however, mine has on-board geforce 6100 with up to 256MB shared, and 1GB of 800mhz ram, not 512MB of 533mhz. For a shop bought PC, it looks good though, although sounds very slow on the RAM front. Awesome if there was one of these on display in a tescos, running compiz/beryl! For that price they would fly!!

popch
October 23rd, 2007, 07:47 AM
the 190 one is about what my base unit cost (self built naturally) however, mine has on-board geforce 6100 with up to 256MB shared, and 1GB of 800mhz ram, not 512MB of 533mhz. For a shop bought PC, it looks good though, although sounds very slow on the RAM front. Awesome if there was one of these on display in a tescos, running compiz/beryl! For that price they would fly!!

Why don't you go to your nearest Tesco and suggest just that? After all, people should be used to young persons being computer literates. Offer to set it up that way for some pocket money.

Nunu
October 23rd, 2007, 07:54 AM
The reason they so cheap is because they don't have a R3500.00 (around 200 pounds) operating system installed. How much does Vista go for now in the UK in any way?

gn2
October 23rd, 2007, 12:23 PM
How much does Vista go for now in the UK in any way?

Vista Basic OEM 51 http://www.ebuyer.com/product/123059
Vista Basic Retail 153 http://www.ebuyer.com/product/119955

Not what I would call value for money.

It has the ability to turn a perfectly good PC into a sluggish and useless pile of junk.

popch
October 23rd, 2007, 12:59 PM
Vista Basic OEM 51 http://www.ebuyer.com/product/123059
Vista Basic Retail 153 http://www.ebuyer.com/product/119955

Not what I would call value for money.

I would suspect that this was the 'retail' price for the 'oem' version. As a largish manufacturer, you would presumably pay a fraction of that price.

gn2
October 23rd, 2007, 01:18 PM
As a largish manufacturer, you would presumably pay a fraction of that price.

Perhaps not. There is a famous case in the UK where a man refused the MS EULA and claimed a refund from Dell and was given a refund of 50 from Dell.

Dell wouldn't have given him more than they paid MS surely?

Here's the story: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/6144782.stm

popch
October 23rd, 2007, 01:20 PM
Perhaps not. There is a famous case in the UK where a man refused the MS EULA and claimed a refund from Dell and was given a refund of 50 from Dell.

Dell wouldn't have given him more than they paid MS surely?

Here's the story: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/6144782.stm

If they had an NDA, we would never find out what they really were paying.

Sorry, 'Non Disclosure Agreement'.

starbase1
October 23rd, 2007, 04:43 PM
People seem to be mixing up several things in this thread...

1. Is this good for Linux?
2. Is it a PC you would recommend?
3. Is it a good price?

In reverse order -

3. Yes, it's a great price. I think it is pretty much half the entry level I have seen before here in the UK.

2. No, I think many people will want more - more storage for their photos and music, more processing power, virtually all aspects can be greatly improved with a little more spend.

1. Yes! Many users have extremely basic needs, and if it has open office, email, and a browser, that really will cover the essentials for a lot of people - and the simple act of placing it in a supermarket will send a big message that it's not just for geeks and nerds.

And don't you just love the idea of seeing a Linux and windows PC, side by side in the shop, similar capabilities, and the M$ one at double the price?
:lolflag:

AlanRogers
December 13th, 2007, 11:54 AM
I missed this thread originally but searched for Linux and Tesco having seeing the article at the foot of page 12 of Issue 856 of Linux Magazine which I bought yesterday in WHSmith. Interestingly, the dearer of the two models is already sold out at Tesco Direct and no reference appears to be made to Ubuntu on that one, just Linux. The cheaper one clearly says Linux (Ubuntu 6.06) is the operating system.

I was amused to read the comments on how it's a piece of rubbish, it's not as good as mine, people could build their own far better for similar money and I have to agree with the spirit of those comments. However, the majority of folk wouldn't know where to start to buy components, which less how to put them together or install an operating system. These facts are the very reason that stores like PC World can do what they do and get away with it.

We're looking at 140 or 190 for a computer here; an affordable christmas present for the kids. Ten years ago, you could have stuck a zero on the end of that and it would have been the one computer for the whole family for the next five years at least. Now, the price is largely irrelevent, it's pocket money. Whether that's a good or a bad thing is a whole different discussion but the key point here is that another major (UK) supplier, not builder mind, is putting Linux on the shelves where it'll be seen by the ignorant masses.

That's definitely a good thing, IMHO. There is an alternative to Microsoft, and it's becoming increasingly viable and known.

tombott
December 13th, 2007, 12:12 PM
This can only be a good thing.
It shows consumers there are other options, and just how much having Windows pre-installed on a machine costs them.
And to everybody who has posted 'i could build a PC cheaper with better specs' I have no doubt that you can.
But factor in the time it takes for you to build the PC 2-3 hours for instance, plus fuel costs / delivery charges on hardware and I am sure that you'll find your PC no cheaper.
The specs' aren't great but what do you expect for under 200.
These PC's make great Web / IM / Email / Word Processing machines, which I imagine is what a large % average home user wants.

saulgoode
December 13th, 2007, 12:16 PM
:shock: 1Gb of processor cache (http://direct.tesco.com/q/R.200-6129/btnResultSort.x%3d509/btnResultSort.y%3d291.aspx). What processor is THAT?! :)

ajclarkson
February 14th, 2008, 03:40 PM
I think people are missing the point in some ways with this thread.

Sure the price is low.
Sure the components aren't top of the range.
Sure it wont last you for a million years without a single hardware glitch.

People who want power systems are out of the target market of this system. Basically, the best thing this will do is give people who want to get into computing the option of buying a cheaper system that runs linux well, because lets face it, Ubuntu will run happily on that spec, for everyday tasks. This means its aimed at Aunty Patty and Grandad Joe, oh and little billy who just wants a PC maybe. It will raise the awareness of the fact that PC does not = windows which is the main misconception of system buyers. Many people think that windows IS the PC not that it is optional.

As for tesco only selling it with linux because its cheap, maybe so. Then again, so what?? They are doing us a favour without realising it, seriously people, this is a GOOD thing for the community.

And RE: windows XP wouldnt run on that.... yes it would....comfortably so. I used to run an XP system on a much worse spec than that before my full time linux days and it ran fine.

tombott
February 14th, 2008, 04:09 PM
I think people are missing the point in some ways with this thread.

Sure the price is low.
Sure the components aren't top of the range.
Sure it wont last you for a million years without a single hardware glitch.

People who want power systems are out of the target market of this system. Basically, the best thing this will do is give people who want to get into computing the option of buying a cheaper system that runs linux well, because lets face it, Ubuntu will run happily on that spec, for everyday tasks. This means its aimed at Aunty Patty and Grandad Joe, oh and little billy who just wants a PC maybe. It will raise the awareness of the fact that PC does not = windows which is the main misconception of system buyers. Many people think that windows IS the PC not that it is optional.

As for tesco only selling it with linux because its cheap, maybe so. Then again, so what?? They are doing us a favour without realising it, seriously people, this is a GOOD thing for the community.

And RE: windows XP wouldnt run on that.... yes it would....comfortably so. I used to run an XP system on a much worse spec than that before my full time linux days and it ran fine.

Well said.
Anything that raises the profile of Linux is good.
And I have run Windows XP on a PIII 450 with 128mb before now. Ok it was slow, but it worked.

jethro10
February 14th, 2008, 05:52 PM
Hey,
I've actually bought one of each of those exact models, thougn not from Tesco, ebuyer had/has them also.

both got more memory in them and one got a second hard disk.

the one with the disk is a Zoneminder CCTV server for work (12 cameras!).

The lesser one is an IM server, proxy and dansguardian web blocker - This one is 18 months old and never missed a beat. Also for work.

I also have a variant of these esys pc's as my main PC at home.

All have been perfect.
Jeff

jethro10
February 14th, 2008, 05:56 PM
Lower system requirements?

I doubt you could get compiz working on those...

Your wrong.
It does on the dearer one at least, cos I have.

:)

Jeff

el_ricardo
February 14th, 2008, 06:06 PM
you'd surprised at how low the hardware specs are for compiz tbh, my flatmate has it running on his old 700MHz imac, 320MB of RAM, and an 8MB integrated gfx card lol1