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View Full Version : New PC! W00t!



Extreme Coder
October 16th, 2007, 01:43 PM
Well, I got fed up from my old PC crashing and giving me stupid errors for no reason all the time, so I sold it ( FYI, it was P4-3.0GHz,512MB RAM,GeForce4MX4000), and bought this:

AMD Athlon 64 x2 4000+ (2.1 GHz)
1.5 GB DDR2 Corsair RAM ( will make them 2 GB soon :) )
MSI K9AGM2,AMD chipset, it has a built-in ATI Radeon X1250 (was a bit uneasy about this one, but when I heard about ATI opening specs, I went for it)
Thermaltake Power Supply

It costed me about $350 ( I used my old HDD, floppy and DVD writer)

I have a question:
I know the processor is not very new. Will it be outdated, or useless in a few months? I really hope I don't need to upgrade it anytime soon.

Also, I can't feel a large difference in peformance between the new PC, and the old one :/ Maybe I should be using 64-bit versions of distros?


Extreme Coder

notwen
October 16th, 2007, 01:47 PM
I know the processor is not very new. Will it be outdated, or useless in a few months? I really hope I don't need to upgrade it anytime soon.

Also, I can't feel a large difference in peformance between the new PC, and the old one :/ Maybe I should be using 64-bit versions of distros?

Everything gets outdated fairly quickly now, there's nothing you can do to stop it. Just don't invest too much into a machine that you'll likely be replacing every 2-3 years if you're one of the types who like to have top-notch hardware specs.

Your old specs should have ran any Ubuntu variant pretty smoothly, I doubt you'll see any change in performance. Were you doing anything on your previous machine that would put a heavy load on it? Try the same tasks on your new machine, depending on the load you may/may not notice a difference. =]

Extreme Coder
October 16th, 2007, 01:55 PM
Everything gets outdated fairly quickly now, there's nothing you can do to stop it. Just don't invest too much into a machine that you'll likely be replacing every 2-3 years if you're one of the types who like to have top-notch hardware specs.
Well, of course I know that. In fact, my whole system could be counted as outdated by now :P lol.

what I meant was, will it be still fast enough for use in like 2-3 years?


Your old specs should have ran any Ubuntu variant pretty smoothly, I doubt you'll see any change in performance. Were you doing anything on your previous machine that would put a heavy load on it? Try the same tasks on your new machine, depending on the load you may/may not notice a difference. =]

I didn't sell my old PC because it was slow, in fact it was fast enough for my needs. I sold it because I kept getting wierd crashes, lock-ups, overheating and the sort all the time. I couldn't bear it anymore, so I sold it.

What I noticed on the new PC, is that it's VERY cool, compared to my old PC. the P4 used to reach temps of 70C, when left running for a few days. This one, I'm running for over a week, and it's still at 33C :D

And I also noticed loading times are shorter, in apps and games. And Half life 2 runs at 35-40 FPS at 1024x768, with most settings at high. While my old card couldn't bear it at 800x600 :P

Tom Mann
October 16th, 2007, 02:04 PM
Hey,

My PC is similar to that (apart I use nVidia)

I am running a 3800X2, and I wouldn't worry about your machine going out of date any time soon, with programmers struggling to use all the cores in processors, you should be fine with two for a fair while yet.

Your graphics card is the one point where you may struggle for upgrades, but only if you're a gamer.

:)

notwen
October 16th, 2007, 02:05 PM
what I meant was, will it be still fast enough for use in like 2-3 years?

Fast enough for using Ubuntu? I'd guess you wouldn't have any issues running Ubuntu/Linux of any kind for general uses. Linux works wonders on older hardware, who knows what requirements will be needed to run whatever current of Windows is out.

Bartender
October 16th, 2007, 02:28 PM
I didn't sell my old PC because it was slow, in fact it was fast enough for my needs. I sold it because I kept getting wierd crashes, lock-ups, overheating and the sort all the time. I couldn't bear it anymore, so I sold it.

the P4 used to reach temps of 70C, when left running for a few days.

Fixing the temperature problem woulda been easy. Betcha the other issues would have gone away...

bonzodog
October 16th, 2007, 02:30 PM
you think an AMD64 X2 is in danger of becoming outdated? you have *at least* 5-8 years to get out of that. I have an AMD 64 3000+ socket 754!. It's two years old, and still makes a damn good rig, runs 95% of all games flawlessly.

Extreme Coder
October 16th, 2007, 02:42 PM
Fixing the temperature problem woulda been easy. Betcha the other issues would have gone away...

Not really.. My neighbour has a very similar PC, and it reaches high temps too, yet with no ugly crashes or stuff like that.

I took my old PC to a computer store(whose owner is a friend of mine), and he said the processor has a problem and needs to be replaced, and that the power supply is very weak. So I said, NO, I won't be spending anymore on that PC :P

Extreme Coder
October 16th, 2007, 02:48 PM
you think an AMD64 X2 is in danger of becoming outdated? you have *at least* 5-8 years to get out of that. I have an AMD 64 3000+ socket 754!. It's two years old, and still makes a damn good rig, runs 95% of all games flawlessly.


I am running a 3800X2, and I wouldn't worry about your machine going out of date any time soon, with programmers struggling to use all the cores in processors, you should be fine with two for a fair while yet.

Thank you both! Major relief to know that. As you can see, I know next to nothing about processors, so I don't know what's fast, and what's not :/


Your graphics card is the one point where you may struggle for upgrades, but only if you're a gamer.

I wouldn't worry about that. Most games(Regnum,Savage,Warsow,Neverwinter Nights, and more) which used to run at low resolutions and quality, are running on everything highest at 1280x1024.
Half Life 2, which is the most resource-intensive game on my PC right now, runs at a very good speed.

Once games start running too slow, I'll just buy a new graphic card :D

benweston
October 16th, 2007, 02:54 PM
I think the advice is somewhat misguided. I agree that most developers are struggling to use the multiple cores on the new processors but the actual architecture of the Athlon X2 is dated. Don't get me wrong, I'm writing this on an Athlon X2 4800+ and it's a nice processor. It's great for general multitasking and that sort of thing. It is not a multimedia processor for the year 2007+

The Core 2 Duos are much faster, even in single-core operation and are a much better investment for a machine that has to last. Once more SMP software is available, the Core 2 Duos will show their strength even more.

And, yes, although I haven't had time to run any benchmarks yet; I noticed a substantial increase in performance going to 64-Bit Gutsy from i386.

sayuki288
October 16th, 2007, 02:54 PM
p4 sucks it gets hot so easily :lolflag:

benweston
October 16th, 2007, 02:56 PM
Oh! And you definitely want to go for the Energy Efficient Athlon X2s like I have here. They run much quieter (lower temps) and put less stress on your PSU (important if it isn't that high quality!)

igknighted
October 16th, 2007, 03:10 PM
p4 sucks it gets hot so easily :lolflag:

If only the g/f was the same way...

Sorry, couldn't resist...

-grubby
October 16th, 2007, 03:25 PM
why are you thinking this new PC might be outdated soon? your old PC is better than my best (which I'm using now)

vishzilla
October 16th, 2007, 04:22 PM
I read a news article saying Intel are working for reduced power consumption for Linux systems

the link (http://www.heise.de/english/newsticker/news/96334)

Cochise
October 16th, 2007, 04:55 PM
I have an AMD 64 3000+ socket 754!. It's two years old, and still makes a damn good rig, runs 95% of all games flawlessly.

same here AMD 64 3200 socket 754, threw 2GB of ram in it and an ATI x300 and its fast enough for me

igknighted
October 16th, 2007, 07:05 PM
I read a news article saying Intel are working for reduced power consumption for Linux systems

the link (http://www.heise.de/english/newsticker/news/96334)

I'll take AMD's actual, quantifiable power savings over some software solution intel is throwing at me. I know my Athlon 64X2 3600+ brisbane chip (the 65nm version) draws next to nothing, and while it certainly does not have the brute horsepower that the core2duo's have, it does everything I could ever need at a fraction of the price ($150 for processor and a pretty good nforce 550 mobo).

Extreme Coder
October 16th, 2007, 09:32 PM
I'll take AMD's actual, quantifiable power savings over some software solution intel is throwing at me. I know my Athlon 64X2 3600+ brisbane chip (the 65nm version) draws next to nothing, and while it certainly does not have the brute horsepower that the core2duo's have, it does everything I could ever need at a fraction of the price ($150 for processor and a pretty good nforce 550 mobo).
Agreed.
There shouldn't be any software solution to something hardware should be doing :P