PDA

View Full Version : Sony does it again - root kit



mips
August 30th, 2007, 06:46 PM
http://www.nytimes.com/reuters/technology/tech-sony-malware.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

http://www.f-secure.com/weblog/archives/archive-082007.html#00001264
http://www.avertlabs.com/research/blog/index.php/2007/08/28/hide-me-sony-one-more-time

dca
August 30th, 2007, 06:49 PM
Jesus, you know, I give up....

Bungo Pony
August 30th, 2007, 06:52 PM
There's just so many reasons not to buy ANYTHING made by Sony. I've been anti-Sony since the mid 1990s. Their products are made like crap, and now they're in the business of installing mystery-ware on your computer.

rsambuca
August 30th, 2007, 06:54 PM
Although technically not a "rootkit", it is typical Sony arrogance.

epimeteo
August 30th, 2007, 07:30 PM
Another one for propriety software. And still people say that they like it, as long they get what they want.

This may seem unappropriated for this thread, but in some threads here in this forum, some people say they don't care about if it's propriety software or open-source, as long it's free like free beer...

Now they can see (one more time) what propriety software is and what it can do.

mips
August 30th, 2007, 07:36 PM
What happened to the last class action lawsuite regarding their cds ?

Maybe people will initiate a new law suite.

~LoKe
August 30th, 2007, 07:44 PM
Although technically not a "rootkit", it is typical Sony arrogance.

It creates hidden files which would allow them to penetrate a computers defenses. How is this not "technically" a rootkit?


A rootkit is a general description of a set of programs which work to subvert control of an operating system from its legitimate operators. Usually, a rootkit will obscure its installation and attempt to prevent its removal through a subversion of standard system security. Techniques used to accomplish this can include concealing running processes, files or system data from the operating system.[1] Rootkits have their origin in benign applications, but in recent years have been used increasingly by malware to help intruders maintain access to systems while avoiding detection. Rootkits exist for a variety of operating systems, such as Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X[2] [3] , Linux and Solaris. Rootkits often modify parts of the operating system or install themselves as drivers or kernel modules.

rsambuca
August 30th, 2007, 08:02 PM
Yes, that is one definition of a rootkit. There are others. I am too tired to get into it because it really doesn't matter.

~LoKe
August 30th, 2007, 08:06 PM
Yes, that is one definition of a rootkit. There are others. I am too tired to get into it because it really doesn't matter.

Then, still by definition, it is a rootkit.

rsambuca
August 30th, 2007, 08:07 PM
By the definition you use, it is. By other definitions, it isn't.

mips
August 30th, 2007, 08:17 PM
Guys, root kit or not, it is bad.

Crashmaxx
August 30th, 2007, 08:22 PM
Do they mean "hidden" folders as in the normal XP hidden ones, that you can see by just selecting "View Hidden Files" or the 'Super' hidden files that you need to know the exact location to find?

rsambuca
August 30th, 2007, 08:25 PM
Guys, root kit or not, it is bad.

100% agree!:popcorn: