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Majorix
August 26th, 2007, 07:25 PM
Is there any good scientific editor that I can use to take notes during the lessons at the college?

I will have some advanced math classes, some advanced physics and some basic chemistry.

It has to be able to draw graphics and functions.

It has to be fast to use, like with keyboard shortcuts etc cause I will use it to take notes during the lesson.

I would prefer it if it had a Windows port too so I can use it on my Windows installation too when I am on it. But its not a must, I just want it to be good, fast and able to draw graphics.

Thanks a lot.

euler_fan
August 26th, 2007, 10:31 PM
Is there any good scientific editor that I can use to take notes during the lessons at the college?

I will have some advanced math classes, some advanced physics and some basic chemistry.

It has to be able to draw graphics and functions.

It has to be fast to use, like with keyboard shortcuts etc cause I will use it to take notes during the lesson.

I would prefer it if it had a Windows port too so I can use it on my Windows installation too when I am on it. But its not a must, I just want it to be good, fast and able to draw graphics.

Thanks a lot.

For math anyway LyX is a great editor. It really speeds up the process of getting LaTeX down once you learn some of the shortcuts and have the LaTeX commands memorized. Very Efficient for formulas and text.

Unfortunately, I don't know any way to get graphics in efficiently. Also, it's not as flexible as a strait LaTeX file (IMHO), but if you're okay with that it meets your other requirements.

Now if you want to take notes and then typeset them, I would say gnuplot for the graphics and LaTeX for the text and equations. With all of the different formatting commands and degree of flexibility you could get some very professional results very quickly.

Good luck.

Majorix
August 26th, 2007, 10:34 PM
How can I mix the results from gnuplot and LyX together? Or are you talking of a different way?

euler_fan
August 26th, 2007, 10:41 PM
How can I mix the results from gnuplot and LyX together? Or are you talking of a different way?

There is a way to embed encapsulated Postscript graphics into documents created in LyX. I have never personally done it, but I know it can be done.

Of course, the plots would have to be done seperately and then embedded.

Or you could use, say, GIMP, and do the same thing depending on what you are trying to get.

Majorix
August 26th, 2007, 10:56 PM
With GIMP it can be tough. I don't have any skills with it hehe. Plus can it draw functions?

I will try the way you are talking about soon and post back how it goes.

If anyone has a better idea please post them in the time between.

Steveire
August 28th, 2007, 08:51 PM
Are you talking about a replacement for pen and paper to take lecture notes?

I'm not sure you can easily replace them with a computer. I had many ideas of an application I'd like to use to do just that, but I haven't yet got around to making it. There's great technology out there for this kind of thing, but it'll all need to be glued together.

I'd say you'll have to stick with pen and paper for now.

Majorix
August 28th, 2007, 09:00 PM
If nothing works I will buy a second hand Tablet PC and use that to take notes. I hate pen and paper more than anything.

DaBigEd
August 29th, 2007, 01:32 PM
As someone who is in their 5th year of a Physics/Math double Major, I'd say use a pen and paper. The sheer volume of equations we cover in a 45min lecture means I can barely keep up writing as fast as I can. Scribbling equations down with a pencil is a hell of a lot easier and faster than using any computer based equation editor. Perhaps worse than this is when lectures involve the derivation of a rather large equation which you examine at the end of the lecture with function sketches. Good luck doing that on a computer. It would be ok for wordy courses (where equations are rare like history etc) but I would definitely go with pencil and paper.

Plus if it was good enough for Abel, Newton, Einstein, Maxwell, Heisenberg, Lie, Bohr, Schrodinger etc. it is good enough for me.

Majorix
August 29th, 2007, 04:29 PM
Thanks a lot for your kind warning. I can understand what you mean.

Still I am thinking I can do it with a Tablet PC or can't I?

BTW, is there any Linux OS for these tablet PC's or do I stick with the Windows that comes on it?

Curtisc
August 29th, 2007, 05:20 PM
I've used a tablet pc to take notes for the past year, and I have to say it's really been good for me for a few reasons. First and foremost, I'm terrible at organizing stuff. I would take notes on scraps of paper and plan on putting them in a binder, but I'd end up losing them. I've tried using notebooks, but that was annoying because profs would hand things out and I wouldn't have anywhere to put them, or I'd miss a class and copy it from someone else and then everything would be out of order. On the tablet, you can add space, insert pages, move text around, and chances are you're not going to accidentally leave your computer sitting on a table in the lounge.

That said, linux is not really up to snuff when it comes to tablet functionality. When I got my tablet, I figured the handwriting recognition thing would be useless (because why would you want to convert to text?), but then I discovered the real benefit - searching through your handwritten notes. It actually works. Plus, the "ink" format in windows is vector based and program independent, so not only can you change the color, size, and shape of your writing, you can copy and paste between programs. I've tried all the programs for linux (xournal, jarnal, gournal) and as much as I like linux more than windows, they just aren't quite as good as onenote or journal.