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Lucradia
May 12th, 2011, 12:03 PM
Ubuntu already has Gimp. its complete replacement for Adobe PS.

No, not until Adjustment layer automation is added, and GIMP was removed from the default apps.

aeronutt
May 12th, 2011, 01:06 PM
Why does Windows do this? Windows should not be able to "turn off" hardware itself. Only the BIOS should be able to do this to be honest.

Well, then you need to also talk to the Linux folks about blacklisting and vgaswitcheroo...because I can also turn off discrete graphics using these tools in Linux (w/o using BIOS). When I do this, battery life goes from ~2hours to ~4 hours. Although the reason for my original post on this particular topic was that it's taken me about 4 weeks of trial and error to get it to work, it happens at boot only, and I can't use the discrete graphics at all. And I'm still not 100% sure I haven't compromised the security of my system. So, big win for Windows.

jackmusick
May 12th, 2011, 04:06 PM
I think the biggest thing for me is Exchange 2007 and 2010 support. Although I understand that it's a Microsoft product, I don't see why there can't be a desktop client that uses the OWA protocol like Android devices do. Maybe there's something I'm missing with this...
Also, the professional tools that are available in other platforms are very nice. Photoshop is a big one, though I can make do with Gimp (I guess.. Ugh)
Along with that, I could list Visual Studio, Powershell (I support a bunch of BPOS users...) I'm sure there's more, but I can't think of any.
Really wish games just worked, but alas, what can you do? OS X still has issues with them, so no complaints really.
ActiveX. I know.. It's so ****** that Microsoft enforces it on a ton of their websites and what not, but remote web workplace won't work without it. My solution to this was to just remote into our client's servers and remote into machines within those sessions.
Multiple Monitors with the damn Nvida driver! Gosh, it works, but it's just so many more extra steps than w/o the driver or with the driver Windows.


Seems like a lengthy list, but overall, I enjoy using Ubuntu (Gnome 3!) more than I do using Windows. I understand why some things have issues and I'm quite okay with all of them. I can get Outlook 2007 to work in Wine fairly well. I'm not a graphics designer so Gimp really is just fine. I'm increasingly programming in Java so Visual Studio is slowly going away for me. Powershell is still a touchy subject and ActiveX can take a hike as I have work arounds.

Furthermore, that I've noticed, printing isn't as seamless. If it works out of the box (a lot of the times it does), it's just as easy as it is on the Mac. However, if it doesn't, installing the driver won't be as cut and dry as it is in Windows. From my experience, as little as that may be, it's just difficult to get drivers to work for your unsupported printer in Ubuntu.

I could probably name a few more things, but a lot of it probably has a fix. I don't want to profess to knowing everything or anything, but I have had my experience and enjoy it all the same.

I also think that it's not as much about what Windows can do that Linux can't, but more about what you can do with Linux that Window's can't. Isn't that why you'd swap platforms in the first place? I swapped because the open source licensing thing really appealed to me. I also liked to have an entirely custom environment. I find that a lot of things that Windows purposely makes difficult, Linux embraces with open arms. It's refreshing even though sometimes it can be a hassle.


Sorry for such a long post! Cheers!

peyre
May 13th, 2011, 04:14 AM
I think the biggest thing for me is Exchange 2007 and 2010 support. Although I understand that it's a Microsoft product, I don't see why there can't be a desktop client that uses the OWA protocol like Android devices do. Maybe there's something I'm missing with this...


Actually, I'm able to use OWA in Xubuntu. Now, that may be because we're still on Exchange 2003 (maybe doesn't work with 2007/10, couldn't say). I have plink.exe and my .ppk key file in my OWA folder. Then I open a terminal window there, and type this in:


./plink.exe -i "leonb.key.ppk" -P 2222 bsaguest@165.107.9.70

Then I open a browser and go to https://165.107.9.57/exchange/, and I'm in. You'll have to change user names, IP addresses, etc. for your business, of course.

Dragonbite
May 13th, 2011, 04:24 AM
Actually, I'm able to use OWA in Xubuntu. Now, that may be because we're still on Exchange 2003 (maybe doesn't work with 2007/10, couldn't say). I have plink.exe and my .ppk key file in my OWA folder. Then I open a terminal window there, and type this in:


./plink.exe -i "leonb.key.ppk" -P 2222 bsaguest@165.107.9.70

Then I open a browser and go to https://165.107.9.57/exchange/, and I'm in. You'll have to change user names, IP addresses, etc. for your business, of course.

I know the idea behind Evolution was to hook into Exchange servers, and that it didn't quite make it. What are your experiences with that?

peyre
May 13th, 2011, 04:37 AM
I know the idea behind Evolution was to hook into Exchange servers, and that it didn't quite make it. What are your experiences with that?

Ooh, haven't tried it in Ubuntu. I remember, though, a few years ago I was trying out SLED 10, and was able to check my email and send my boss a test mail pretty seamlessly. Of course, that was SLED, which was tied into that Novell/Microsoft collaboration I think. Maybe it wouldn't be so easy with vanilla Evolution.

just-work-ffs
May 13th, 2011, 09:41 PM
Is it integrated? (IE: Via E-ATX Motherboards) Or its own PCI Slot?

It is PCIe.


Official Driver from the AMD Site? Or is it from Envy (Depreciated)? or Jockey (Hardware Drivers Dialog)?

I tried Jockey and the AMD ones however as it turned out all of my problems were related to the USB stick I was using, I was constantly getting update-initramfs errors. I assumed the persistence file on the stick would allow me to "try before I buy", apparently that is wrong :D

So as I still had a little bit of deductive reasoning left in me I set aside a test partition and installed Kubuntu 11.04 on it. Everything worked far better than I expected except for the microphone on the X-FI. The onboard microphone works though so it's not a deal breaker.

I am now a happy 100% free of Windows user :). I've been wanting to make the full switch as I quit my job 6 months ago which required Windows.

Lucradia
May 13th, 2011, 09:45 PM
So as I still had a little bit of deductive reasoning left in me I set aside a test partition and installed Kubuntu 11.04 on it. Everything worked far better than I expected except for the microphone on the X-FI. The onboard microphone works though so it's not a deal breaker.

I am now a happy 100% free of Windows user :). I've been wanting to make the full switch as I quit my job 6 months ago which required Windows.

If you don't have alsa-utils installed, install them, and in terminal run alsamixer. Tab to see your input devices. Press Space to change to a Capture device and up/down arrows to change volume, while left/right arrows change current selection.

if the problem is, and it usually is, ALSA not getting the right Microphone jack, and you change it make sure, after you exit alsamixer, run sudo alsactl store to save the settings from alsamixer. (Or else you'll have to do this again when you relog.) Make sure PCM is unmuted to Flash.

Gatemaze
May 13th, 2011, 09:47 PM
Oh well, why not make the thread longer.

Right the things that I am missing from windows (well not me really but everytime that people ask me about linux) are:

1. MS Office
2. and sometimes photoshop too...
3. and hopefully not skype now

Lucradia
May 13th, 2011, 09:48 PM
Oh well, why not make the thread longer.

Right the things that I am missing from windows (well not me really but everytime that people ask me about linux) are:

1. MS Office
2. and sometimes photoshop too...
3. and hopefully not skype now

The skype plugin for Pidgin is not made by skype, just so you know (but still needs an install of skype running >_>)

Also, when you show someone GIMP, they'll say "Ew, it's ugly." That's why GIMP 2.8 needs to go live when it does this fall.

Bandit
May 14th, 2011, 09:43 PM
I just been wondering what other users have found that windows is able to do that linux (more specifically ubuntu) cant do...

so far the only thing i have found that i cant do anymore is gaming and a few online videos dont work sometimes

also, add anything to the list that makes one better or worse than the other, such as linux being practically virus free

This --> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NNcQX033V_M

Bandit
May 14th, 2011, 09:45 PM
No, not until Adjustment layer automation is added, and GIMP was removed from the default apps.

For sake of arguing PS isnt a defualt apt in windows either.. \\:D/

peyre
May 15th, 2011, 04:53 AM
Whoa! Hey Bandit! I thought I'd never run into another Certified Internet Webmaster.

aphatak
May 16th, 2011, 05:29 PM
The one thing Windows can do that Linux doesn't is handwriting recognition. I have a couple of old tablet PCs - HP TC4400's; Windows provides an on-screen writing pad that recognizes cursive handwriting, and translates that into characters on the fly; that means you can write notes in longhand, and have them inserted directly into any application that would otherwise process keyboard input.

The Cellwriter on Linux does recognize characters wrtten into cells - one character per cell, but that doesn't come anywhere near the Windows pad.

Apart from that, I really haven't found anything for which Linux will not do. There are some Web-sites that check for, and work only if you are using, Internet Explorer, but I don't think I can count it as a Windows capability that Linux lacks.

Oh, and Windows can get infected with a variety of viruses that Linux can't!

peyre
May 17th, 2011, 03:37 AM
Oh, and Windows can get infected with a variety of viruses that Linux can't!

Not to mention the malware I have to keep wiping off my wife's computer.

heartbeatz
May 20th, 2011, 05:52 PM
ToBeHonest I don't think Windows can do iTunes, the iTunes port for Windows is a completely re-written shoddy attempt by Apple for Windows users.

iTunes on Mac is perfect becuase it's clinically intergrated into the framework and uses Qtime to play audio.

bob steele
May 23rd, 2011, 04:13 AM
I just been wondering what other users have found that windows is able to do that linux (more specifically ubuntu) cant do...

so far the only thing i have found that i cant do anymore is gaming and a few online videos dont work sometimes

also, add anything to the list that makes one better or worse than the other, such as linux being practically virus free

Hi All,

This is my first foray into the world of Linux forums so be kind please ):P

My experience with microsoft goes as far back as the dim dark old days when the DOS shell was our only window. In recent years I have been trying disparately to get off microsoft and onto Linux. I have tried most of the common distros and am currently using Ubuntu 11.04 with the Gnome desktop. Unity is too fiddly and glossy for me.

So, I reckon itś windows hands down with regards drivers/firmware. I've been trying for days now to install the OEM software for our Samsung CLX 3175FN printer, all to no avail. Under windows, pop in the disk and double click the setup, follow the bouncing ball all the way to the test page and your done.

With Ubuntu, itś sudo this and root that and if that fails see your system administrator! Itś a home network, there is no system administrator and the drivers/software are still not working. Windows definitely wins hands down on driver installation Iḿ afraid.

I agree that games are another issue that windows has tied up nicely.

When the Linux community gets all games developers to make their stuff platform independent and gets all the hardware manufacturers to make their stuff extended firmware interface compliant, that will be the day that windows ceases to be relevant :D.


Yours Sincerely

bob steele

PS If anyone knows how to install the Samsung network printer, my family would be really happy :D

peyre
May 23rd, 2011, 05:20 AM
Well, I have to say Ubuntu has its weaknesses, bob. On my system, I have two big gripes. One is that I have mounting issues, which I understand are long-standing bugs in Xubuntu. You'd think they'd have resolved long-standing bugs in basic functions like mounting, but it's open-source Linux, not proprietary deep-pockets Windows, so I don't want to be too ungratious looking the gift horse in the mouth.

The other gripe I have is that CHANGES DON'T STICK. When I make a configuration change somewhere, at some point I'm likely to turn around and see that it's changed itself. That sometimes means that things fix themselves: a good example is the Linux version of Alpha Centauri--I went through all the hoops to get it running on my modern Xubuntu operating system and it just wouldn't work...then a few months later I double-clicked on the icon for the hell of it, and suddenly it worked, just like that. But more often I'll have gotten something working, and one day it stops working, or it needs to be readjusted, or the icon moves all on its own for no reason whatsoever, or what have you. It's not on the order of a Problem, but it is an annoyance. You just don't have that with Windows, and again I don't want to look that gift horse too squarely in the mouth. But all the same, I don't want to hear people tell me Linux is better than Windows when it does this kind of screwing with the user.

Allavona
May 23rd, 2011, 06:19 AM
Windows can give you the "BLUE SCREEN" and then give you a warning that BLUE SCREEN has done something wrong and needs to be closed!!!!!

irv
May 23rd, 2011, 07:06 PM
I suppose this can happen on any OS. But my daughter-in-law dropped off my grandkid's computer because right in the middle of and update, (where it said, do not turn off computer), the computer shut down and restarted again. The only problem was that would just keep shutting down and restarting again.

I tried running the repair on it but it keep telling me I couldn't repair it. After awhile of trying to get it going again, I just had to do a clean re-install.
By the way it was Windows Vista. MS's white elephant.

Hutom
May 24th, 2011, 10:23 AM
I think gaming is the most important for a lot of people. Also a lot of professionals miss Photoshop.

Also the Adobe PDF Editor.

irv
May 24th, 2011, 12:38 PM
Also the Adobe PDF Editor.

Linux has a PDF editor, but I don't find it helpful. I just use openoffice or libreoffice to do this job.

Dragonbite
May 24th, 2011, 02:45 PM
I find open source programs adequate.
I find Windows programs (usually) more fulfilling.
I find cloud programming promising.

bob steele
May 25th, 2011, 01:57 PM
I just been wondering what other users have found that windows is able to do that linux (more specifically ubuntu) cant do...

so far the only thing i have found that i cant do anymore is gaming and a few online videos dont work sometimes

also, add anything to the list that makes one better or worse than the other, such as linux being practically virus free

I've just thought of something else windows does better than Linux :(.

Actually, it would probably be better to say the Linux community! Peripheral support! I have a Samsung CLX 3175FN printer, scanner and fax. It was a real trick to make the printer work, but sadly the scanner and fax... well, it's just too difficult :(. And, I know I'm not alone and it's not just the Samsung. There seems no easy way in Linux to just say "install this driver for this device".

:( sadly windows has Linux beaten there :(


Yours Sincerely

Bob Steele

Dragonbite
May 25th, 2011, 02:05 PM
Just last night I was trying to make a Live USB (of Fedora 15) and somehow it got messed up.

Linux wasn't seeing the flash drive and using fdisk I could clear and replace the partitions after going through and figuring out the commands. Linux still couldn't see it.

Switch to Windows, open My Computer, right-click on the USB drive, and select "Format", done.

Then when I switched back to Windows it saw it with no problems and installed without any further issue.

This isn't the first time that I have ended up flipping over to Windows to format a USB so Linux can see the drive (usually so I can install a Live image).

handy
May 25th, 2011, 03:20 PM
Linux doesn't handle Sibelius & add-ons at all well. Which really is a pain to the professional musicians who would love to dump Windows & don't want to go with Apple (which does handle Sibelius & add-ons very well).

shalamabobbi
May 25th, 2011, 09:30 PM
I just been wondering what other users have found that windows is able to do that linux (more specifically ubuntu) cant do...

so far the only thing i have found that i cant do anymore is gaming and a few online videos dont work sometimes

also, add anything to the list that makes one better or worse than the other, such as linux being practically virus free

How about Finale software? MuseScore is the only alternative I am aware of but it can't duplicate the orchestral samples of Finale and it's playback feature..

(posting this hoping to be proved wrong by somebody out there..)

irv
May 25th, 2011, 09:44 PM
Just last night I was trying to make a Live USB (of Fedora 15) and somehow it got messed up.

Linux wasn't seeing the flash drive and using fdisk I could clear and replace the partitions after going through and figuring out the commands. Linux still couldn't see it.

Switch to Windows, open My Computer, right-click on the USB drive, and select "Format", done.

Then when I switched back to Windows it saw it with no problems and installed without any further issue.

This isn't the first time that I have ended up flipping over to Windows to format a USB so Linux can see the drive (usually so I can install a Live image).

I use gparted to format and repartition my USB drives. Works great for me.

Dragonbite
May 25th, 2011, 11:09 PM
I use gparted to format and repartition my USB drives. Works great for me.

For whatever reason, it doesn't work so great for me. I've tried.

murderslastcrow
May 25th, 2011, 11:55 PM
I've had a lot of experiences helping people try out Linux for the first time, and the only people who complain are people who work on their computer with specific applications, or people who game. And I honestly don't think the majority of Linux developers can do anything about the gaming issue, nor should they- we're not targetting gamers, although Wine does splendidly for most of them.

I'd say that, games aside, Adobe and Autodesk products are the most common culprits for working professionals. There are a lot of great alternatives, and even when GIMP gets full GEGL integration and CMYK/other color mode support, those people may have to use Adobe/Autodesk products simply because their workplace does, and there's no way around it.

The kids who grew up stealing Photoshop and only doing digital work should be perfectly fine with GIMP. If you want something exactly like Windows and Photoshop without viruses, we don't want your attitude. Although I'm sure you can get Linux to look and act just like Windows and run Photoshop really well in Wine, anyway.

Aside from that, complaints usually come down to iTunes store or Netflix for common users, who don't game or have a work issue. Netflix won't really be an issue anymore with their HTML5 player, and iTunes... well, I just tell people that if they can use Amazon mp3 store I'll help them move their music over and convert it to a format they can keep on any platform. And if they don't want to use a native Linux media player then they can always run iTunes in Virtualbox, but that's usually beyond that type of user. I think people should really reconsider using iTunes regardless of the OS they use, though. It's really quite restrictive, and doesn't honor the desires of the consumer.

The only real issue getting people to take an honest, hard look at Linux is to explain that it's different up front, but that it has many benefits, and if they can use all open source software, then it will make their computing easier for years to come. If you can use a good open source application with strong development, it will just make your life easier in the long run, so you can forget about all that and actually enjoy your computer.

Of course, even the people who want iTunes end up dual-booting a lot of the time since they enjoy Ubuntu so much.

irv
May 26th, 2011, 07:14 PM
murderslastcrow: Netflix won't really be an issue anymore with their HTML5 player.......
Of course, even the people who want iTunes end up dual-booting a lot of the time since they enjoy Ubuntu so much.
Enjoyed your post. Got two question for you.
1. Wasn't sure what you meant on the HTML5 player? Is this something that is coming out from Netflix?
2. The last part of your post fits me. The question I have though, is there a way to have Banshee or Rhythmbox got to a itune store? I could not find anything in the setup. I take some college courses and the lectures are in a itune store. I can download them in Windows and view them in Linux but I would love to do it all in Linux.
Thanks in advance if you can answer these questions.

Edit:
Basically, it looks like the Microsoft Silverlight video player is here to stay at least, for now. Once HTML5 Video becomes more mature and supports strong DRM capabilities, it will become a more viable option. Unfortunately, that will probably take a few years.
http://venturebeat.com/2010/05/20/netflix-talks-html5-but-not-for-video-adds-video-output-to-ipad-app/

bpb_21
May 27th, 2011, 02:41 AM
Mentally enslave millions of people into thinking there is only one way to be connected to Information etc.
...


I'll apologize in advance for this, but in regard to the above statement aren't you referring to Apple?

Zombie Savant
May 28th, 2011, 09:51 PM
Linux wont talk to certain printers/ scanners (lexus in particular), and it is difficult to find a decent video editor that will work with linux.

i think some of these issues can be dealt with using a "windows box," but i don't have much experience so i don't really know.

peyre
May 28th, 2011, 10:16 PM
That's true, though it's not really the fault of Linux itself. The only reason that everything works with Windows is because manufacturers write drivers for them. Ditto for deluxe software--if they don't write it for Linux, can't really blame Linux for that. Really it's surprising how good a job Linux does actually getting some things to work that weren't written for it. Just the same, that is an issue that Linux users have to deal with. It's always inconvenient to be part of a minority, and with a 1% install base, we're pretty definitely in the minority.

RaZoR1394
June 5th, 2011, 07:50 AM
I never seem to get my HP Photosmart 7960 working in Ubuntu. It crashes the whole printer. It works fine in Windows.

erjoalgo
June 5th, 2011, 10:05 PM
Hibernate and resume very quickly
64-bit Flash is not a problem, e.g. Youtube, flash games, (npviewer.bin in Ubuntu is usually a monster in cpu consumption)
No problems with wireless drivers
No problems with bad ATI drivers slowing the system down to a halt.
Windows still required for most gaming

renkinjutsu
June 5th, 2011, 10:13 PM
Hibernate and resume very quickly


I don't know what everyone's configurations are but my desktop/laptops can suspend/resume and hibernate/resume pretty quickly.. Much faster than windows.

Besides, isn't hibernate dependent on harddrive speed?

weasel fierce
June 5th, 2011, 10:31 PM
That's true, though it's not really the fault of Linux itself. The only reason that everything works with Windows is because manufacturers write drivers for them. Ditto for deluxe software--if they don't write it for Linux, can't really blame Linux for that. Really it's surprising how good a job Linux does actually getting some things to work that weren't written for it. Just the same, that is an issue that Linux users have to deal with. It's always inconvenient to be part of a minority, and with a 1% install base, we're pretty definitely in the minority.

Indeed.

I too wish that linux was produced by a giant corporation getting 300 million dollars of tax breaks by the US government every year.

Oh wait..

Lucradia
June 5th, 2011, 10:47 PM
Linux wont talk to certain printers/ scanners (lexus in particular)

Those are some mighty expensive, drivable, printers!

frankvw
June 6th, 2011, 09:57 AM
> What can Windows do that Linux can't?

Offhand, without having read all the 200+ pages in this thread, I'd say that one thing Linux still doesn't do for me, is copying so-called copy-protected DVDs.

I have tried this any number of times in the past (legally, I hasten to point out; I have one of those Networked Media Tank thingies with an internal 1TB harddisk on which I like to store my own DVDs for convenient menu-based playback without having to swap pieces of silvered plastic all the time) but so far I have had to resort to Windows.

More and more manufacturers are releasing these so-called copy-protected discs, in a manner that essentially violates all DVD standards (which is why many of them, for legal reasons, omit the standard DVD symbol on the packaging). This not only limits the user's legal rights for no good reason (I mean, it's not like this stops any DVD piracy; just look on the torrent sites) but also can make it impossible to play back legally bought DVDs in a legal manner (e.g. on one's PC).

The software for copying these maltreated discs is available in abundance for Windows, but not so for Linux. Given the need for direct hardware access, running these ripping tools in VirtualBox or a similar VM doesn't work (most of the time) either.

So I still have an XP box hidden somewhere... :-/

// FvW

digbysellers
June 8th, 2011, 12:49 AM
Watchable fullscreen Flash video. Pathetic.

peyre
June 8th, 2011, 05:38 AM
> What can Windows do that Linux can't?

Offhand, without having read all the 200+ pages in this thread, I'd say that one thing Linux still doesn't do for me, is copying so-called copy-protected DVDs.

I have tried this any number of times in the past (legally, I hasten to point out; I have one of those Networked Media Tank thingies with an internal 1TB harddisk on which I like to store my own DVDs for convenient menu-based playback without having to swap pieces of silvered plastic all the time) but so far I have had to resort to Windows.

More and more manufacturers are releasing these so-called copy-protected discs, in a manner that essentially violates all DVD standards (which is why many of them, for legal reasons, omit the standard DVD symbol on the packaging). This not only limits the user's legal rights for no good reason (I mean, it's not like this stops any DVD piracy; just look on the torrent sites) but also can make it impossible to play back legally bought DVDs in a legal manner (e.g. on one's PC).

The software for copying these maltreated discs is available in abundance for Windows, but not so for Linux. Given the need for direct hardware access, running these ripping tools in VirtualBox or a similar VM doesn't work (most of the time) either.

So I still have an XP box hidden somewhere... :-/

// FvW

Try DVD Shrink. It's a Windows program, but it runs in Wine on my system flawlessly.

http://appdb.winehq.org/objectManager.php?sClass=version&iId=2230

tortugo23
June 8th, 2011, 06:05 PM
Windows can print without streaking the colors.
http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1774191&highlight=epson+printer+workforce

honeybear
June 13th, 2011, 03:25 AM
Photoshop? Nah theres gimp.


Gimp is not Photoshop. That's why some miss it. There are also temptatives of port (no cloning, nor wine)

JohnBonne
June 15th, 2011, 06:34 PM
Linux cannot claim Intellectual Property, nor can it operate without reverse engineering.

I am really unimpressed with Linux, but the same goes for Windows.

Windows is better for Gamers; but for someone who wants to know Computers, Linux is better. For Ex. You cant get inside of Windows video drivers to rewrite them without a lot of skill, which Linux users take for granted as these drivers are opened no different than any other program.

Linux has no registry that I know of.

Reparse records are Linux territory but windows has started to take advantage of it in the NTFS system.

Just stuff I have noticed.

nomko
June 15th, 2011, 06:40 PM
What can Windows do that Linux can't??????

hmmmm.......:-k Let me think about that one...........

Ohh YES!!! :)

Linux can't show that stupid "blue screen of death" when Linux crashes, when does Linux crash...... :lolflag:

CompyTheInsane
June 15th, 2011, 07:08 PM
What can Windows do that Linux can't??????

hmmmm.......:-k Let me think about that one...........

Ohh YES!!! :)

Linux can't show that stupid "blue screen of death" when Linux crashes, when does Linux crash...... :lolflag:

Yes it can. It's called the kernel panic. :P
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Kernel-panic.jpg

Puz
June 15th, 2011, 07:10 PM
Tax programs & Embroidery are two areas that need linux community

sammiev
June 15th, 2011, 07:16 PM
One thing that Windows can do that Linux can't do is the dishes. While my wife boots her computer she has time to do the dishes. I hope she doesn't switch to Linux! :p

Puz
June 15th, 2011, 07:17 PM
With any new program there is a learning curve. That does not necessarily mean its is harder just something new to learn. Yes, sometimes when you know one program and try to switch to another program you may have to unlearn what you know which can seem to make it harder.

prodigy_
June 15th, 2011, 07:37 PM
Linux cannot claim Intellectual Property
Personally I don't believe in so-called "intellectual property" but de-jure nothing forces you to use GPL for your Linux programs if that's what you mean. Write your code from scratch and use whatever license you want for it.


nor can it operate without reverse engineering.
Err... what? :)

Copper Bezel
June 16th, 2011, 02:43 AM
Yeah, let's not forget that the fact that Windows has a GUI is a result of "reverse engineering." = )

n3le
June 16th, 2011, 01:55 PM
Linux is great operating system, my favorite, still there are some things where Windows or Mac users have advantage. First thing are drivers for newest hardware (it's not Linux or community fault that Linux doesn't include newest drivers - it's rather fault of hardware makers who do not include open documentation). Second thing is third party software for professional use. Let me explain - it's not that you can't find alternative open-source software that comes prepackaged with most Linux distributions but some software is typical for some industries (Photoshop - for publishing industry)(or software for taxes - different for every county - usually not open-source). On the other hand what is Linux really great at is servers! The best thing is that is licensing free - unlike Microsoft, Adobe etc. products. Another great thing is free documentation and great community. There is even more - you get a source-code for all open-source applications and you are free to alter the software! I personaly think that you have to put more time and energy into getting to know Linux OS, but it's defenetly worth your time. You get software and updates for free (no licencing fees) - and when you learn how to use you Linux system you don't have to learn over and over again do to the fact that Linux developer follow the standards (especially true with cli)

nrundy
June 16th, 2011, 08:54 PM
Windows 7 can run a LOT cooler, quieter, and longer on battery. This is the only thing keeping me from completely switching to Ubuntu.

felixq78
June 18th, 2011, 05:26 PM
I just been wondering what other users have found that windows is able to do that linux (more specifically ubuntu) cant do...

so far the only thing i have found that i cant do anymore is gaming and a few online videos dont work sometimes

also, add anything to the list that makes one better or worse than the other, such as linux being practically virus free

Infect your computer with unwanted viruses and spy-ware ?

Dragonbite
June 19th, 2011, 03:09 AM
Infect your computer with unwanted viruses and spy-ware ?

That's already been mentioned. A few times, now.

ellaivarios
June 19th, 2011, 03:44 AM
I love Linux, but It is retarded in some ways. If you have an answer for one very simple thing that Windows can do but Linux can't do, here it is:

First issue: Windows can make folders and files hidden just by applying an attribute to the file, that is, without renaming the bloody file so that it has a dot in front of it. Whoever thought of this dumb system in linux just didn't think things through entirely. It's been the source of numerous headaches for me.

I use both windows and Linux; windows at school where I teach, and linux at home. Some folders are hidden in Windows. I don't mind at all that they are not hidden in Linux. But I want to make them hidden, without renaming them by adding a dot in front of the name. I don't want for example the folder "GreekTexts" to be renamed to ".GreekTexts" because the links and shortcuts and programs that cal files from within this folder in windows will not be able to find anything. Moreover, by adding a dot to the folder name, when you view the files and folders in list view whether in Linux or Windows, the folder is not in the same location.

Second issue: Have you tried having folders with "-" in front of the name? In Windows they all go to the top of list view in the alphabetical order. In Linux, they just go wherever or just follow the alphabetical order of the first letter after the "-" and that's if you are lucky, because most times they shuffle around in order of appearance in list view, which is frustrating, because If I wanted "-" in front of a name to be inconsequential, I wouldn't have added it, would I? I want the "-" to act like "1." or "3." in front of a file name or folder, so it gives me a folder grouping order. Anyway... Some Guru will try to be smart and try telling me of another fancy way of organizing my folders. I don't want to. Secondly, since my time, when DOS was around, with the coming of win 3.11, and then win 95, win 98,Knoppix, win 2000, red hat (stable), win xp, Ubuntu, Win Vista, Win 7, and who know what will be next, you people who design Operating systems must know that aside from the average clown teenager who needs the folders "documents" "photos" videos' and the such, there are people who have had files and folders migrating through the OS wars and systems through the years. The only SAFE way to catalogue and maintain order in files is through Strict Folder Organisation.

Those are my two things Linux doesn't have.

Of course there's the issue with not having Quark Xpress, InDesign, or Photoshop and the such, plus the fact that Microsoft has ensured monopoly by ensuring programs require DirectX instead of OpenGL....

As for the games, well who cares... that's why there's still dual booting...

If anyone has any ideas on how to hide files in Ubuntu Linux without renaming hem with a dot prefix, PLEASE TELL ME!!!!

dniMretsaM
June 19th, 2011, 09:36 PM
I love Linux, but It is retarded in some ways. If you have an answer for one very simple thing that Windows can do but Linux can't do, here it is:

First issue: Windows can make folders and files hidden just by applying an attribute to the file, that is, without renaming the bloody file so that it has a dot in front of it. Whoever thought of this dumb system in linux just didn't think things through entirely. It's been the source of numerous headaches for me.

I use both windows and Linux; windows at school where I teach, and linux at home. Some folders are hidden in Windows. I don't mind at all that they are not hidden in Linux. But I want to make them hidden, without renaming them by adding a dot in front of the name. I don't want for example the folder "GreekTexts" to be renamed to ".GreekTexts" because the links and shortcuts and programs that cal files from within this folder in windows will not be able to find anything. Moreover, by adding a dot to the folder name, when you view the files and folders in list view whether in Linux or Windows, the folder is not in the same location.

Second issue: Have you tried having folders with "-" in front of the name? In Windows they all go to the top of list view in the alphabetical order. In Linux, they just go wherever or just follow the alphabetical order of the first letter after the "-" and that's if you are lucky, because most times they shuffle around in order of appearance in list view, which is frustrating, because If I wanted "-" in front of a name to be inconsequential, I wouldn't have added it, would I? I want the "-" to act like "1." or "3." in front of a file name or folder, so it gives me a folder grouping order. Anyway... Some Guru will try to be smart and try telling me of another fancy way of organizing my folders. I don't want to. Secondly, since my time, when DOS was around, with the coming of win 3.11, and then win 95, win 98,Knoppix, win 2000, red hat (stable), win xp, Ubuntu, Win Vista, Win 7, and who know what will be next, you people who design Operating systems must know that aside from the average clown teenager who needs the folders "documents" "photos" videos' and the such, there are people who have had files and folders migrating through the OS wars and systems through the years. The only SAFE way to catalogue and maintain order in files is through Strict Folder Organisation.

Those are my two things Linux doesn't have.

Of course there's the issue with not having Quark Xpress, InDesign, or Photoshop and the such, plus the fact that Microsoft has ensured monopoly by ensuring programs require DirectX instead of OpenGL....

As for the games, well who cares... that's why there's still dual booting...

If anyone has any ideas on how to hide files in Ubuntu Linux without renaming hem with a dot prefix, PLEASE TELL ME!!!!
The dot thing is just how Linux works. Linux is not Windows and thus it is different. I personally like it better. Maybe talk to some devs about it. And as for the second one, adding a - does move it to the top of the list. At least on Kubuntu 11.04.

matthew.ball
June 20th, 2011, 04:48 AM
I love Linux, but It is retarded in some ways. If you have an answer for one very simple thing that Windows can do but Linux can't do, here it is:

First issue: Windows can make folders and files hidden just by applying an attribute to the file, that is, without renaming the bloody file so that it has a dot in front of it. Whoever thought of this dumb system in linux just didn't think things through entirely. It's been the source of numerous headaches for me.

I use both windows and Linux; windows at school where I teach, and linux at home. Some folders are hidden in Windows. I don't mind at all that they are not hidden in Linux. But I want to make them hidden, without renaming them by adding a dot in front of the name. I don't want for example the folder "GreekTexts" to be renamed to ".GreekTexts" because the links and shortcuts and programs that cal files from within this folder in windows will not be able to find anything. Moreover, by adding a dot to the folder name, when you view the files and folders in list view whether in Linux or Windows, the folder is not in the same location.

If anyone has any ideas on how to hide files in Ubuntu Linux without renaming hem with a dot prefix, PLEASE TELL ME!!!!
Create a file called ".hidden" in the directory with the file(s) you want to hide. Add said file(s) (one per line) to the file titled ".hidden". Refresh.

peyre
June 20th, 2011, 05:04 AM
I love Linux, but It is retarded in some ways. If you have an answer for one very simple thing that Windows can do but Linux can't do, here it is:

First issue: Windows can make folders and files hidden just by applying an attribute to the file, that is, without renaming the bloody file so that it has a dot in front of it. Whoever thought of this dumb system in linux just didn't think things through entirely. It's been the source of numerous headaches for me.

I use both windows and Linux; windows at school where I teach, and linux at home. Some folders are hidden in Windows. I don't mind at all that they are not hidden in Linux. But I want to make them hidden, without renaming them by adding a dot in front of the name. I don't want for example the folder "GreekTexts" to be renamed to ".GreekTexts" because the links and shortcuts and programs that cal files from within this folder in windows will not be able to find anything. Moreover, by adding a dot to the folder name, when you view the files and folders in list view whether in Linux or Windows, the folder is not in the same location.

Second issue: Have you tried having folders with "-" in front of the name? In Windows they all go to the top of list view in the alphabetical order. In Linux, they just go wherever or just follow the alphabetical order of the first letter after the "-" and that's if you are lucky, because most times they shuffle around in order of appearance in list view, which is frustrating, because If I wanted "-" in front of a name to be inconsequential, I wouldn't have added it, would I? I want the "-" to act like "1." or "3." in front of a file name or folder, so it gives me a folder grouping order. Anyway... Some Guru will try to be smart and try telling me of another fancy way of organizing my folders. I don't want to. Secondly, since my time, when DOS was around, with the coming of win 3.11, and then win 95, win 98,Knoppix, win 2000, red hat (stable), win xp, Ubuntu, Win Vista, Win 7, and who know what will be next, you people who design Operating systems must know that aside from the average clown teenager who needs the folders "documents" "photos" videos' and the such, there are people who have had files and folders migrating through the OS wars and systems through the years. The only SAFE way to catalogue and maintain order in files is through Strict Folder Organisation.

Those are my two things Linux doesn't have.

Of course there's the issue with not having Quark Xpress, InDesign, or Photoshop and the such, plus the fact that Microsoft has ensured monopoly by ensuring programs require DirectX instead of OpenGL....

As for the games, well who cares... that's why there's still dual booting...

If anyone has any ideas on how to hide files in Ubuntu Linux without renaming hem with a dot prefix, PLEASE TELL ME!!!!

Quite the rant there ... then again, I've had equivalent complaints about it myself. I'm not going to be the type to say "Well--it's not Windows" in that smug, self-satisfied way that some Linux devotees will tell you, as if to say "Ha! I got you for trying it without being ready to immediately change over your entire computing experience to the way we Special Ones do things." But, it's true that, since this is a different operating system, there will be some significant differences, and some of them will be uncomfortable.

One thing you should be aware of is that the method of designating hidden files isn't something Linux started--it's just what Linux inherited from Unix--sort of like how Windows uses the slash for switches, which it inherited from DOS. I can imagine a native Linux user saying "WTF is this, using a slash for switches instead of directories?" I can see how the whole "renaming to make it hidden" thing could be annoying, but it's just the way *nix works; it's not Linux trying to be different or whatnot. It hasn't really bothered me, personally--nor has the file order thing (I've just kind of gotten used to that)--but I can see how it might get in some people's way. Certain other things in Linux certainly have!--like its awkwardness with removable media or the fact that I can't copy in Thunar and paste into Nautilus, for instance. But those are just inconveniences I've done my best to live with. Every time I deal with Windows licensing (yes, I'm an IT worker), I'm reminded what keeps me going with Linux.

Lucradia
June 20th, 2011, 11:47 AM
I can finally add something to this list.

Windows can play Eden Eternal, Linux cannot, even via WINE:

http://appdb.winehq.org/objectManager.php?sClass=application&iId=13119

Even though X-Legend's previous games (Kitsu Saga and Grand Fantasia) play fine.

anthr6x
June 20th, 2011, 12:19 PM
1. get infected with almost any malware out there
2. give you the cool looking Blue Screen of Death
3. eat all your hardware resources regardless how powerful your PC is.
4. play solitaire (even during the installation process)
5. make you feel important by asking the same question over and over again with pop-up s (only on vista and 7)
6. overwrite the boot sector and mess everything up for you when you try to multi-boot with and older version than the existing OS.
7. make you pay for new hardware upgrade with each and every release.

:guitar:and it's cooler than any other OS

Lucradia
June 20th, 2011, 12:26 PM
1. get infected with almost any malware out there
Dependant on the user's ability to not click links they aren't familiar with (IE: Ads.) Or not installing good anti-malware software (COMODO, MSE, etc.)


2. give you the cool looking Blue Screen of Death
This will be Black in Windows 8, and won't have the cool memory dump information.


3. eat all your hardware resources regardless how powerful your PC is.
This is dependant on the driver specification. If any part of the driver code is malformed, it can cause leakage of performance. I know I've had epically good performance before on Intel Core 2 Duos (3.0+ GHz) and a GTS 250 NVIDIA Card, which, by the way, could record Perfect World MMORPG at above 720p full screen at almost 60fps (45fps) without much lag or tearing.


4. play solitaire (even during the installation process)
Nope. If you have an OEM / Retail install disk, you actually can't do anything during installation. This was also true on Windows XP / earlier, as the task manager could not be called during the installation (I know, I've tried.) Even if you could do this, ubuntu has been able to do it for a while.


5. make you feel important by asking the same question over and over again with pop-up s (only on vista and 7)
UAC? Linux does this too on a sudo machine. Or on a non-sudo machine: "You must be root."


6. overwrite the boot sector and mess everything up for you when you try to multi-boot with and older version than the existing OS.
Linux can do this too. I've had it happen.


7. make you pay for new hardware upgrade with each and every release.
Err, why? Windows XP SP3 can work fine on an IBM T41.

Dragonbite
June 20th, 2011, 01:57 PM
Anyway... Some Guru will try to be smart and try telling me of another fancy way of organizing my folders. I don't want to.

If you want something that walks like a duck, swims like a duck and quacks like a duck... then get a duck. No sense trying to make a swan do all that.

linuxyogi
June 20th, 2011, 03:42 PM
I really wish Wine will reach a level where we can just install any Windows Games without any issues.

Thats the only thing I miss.


http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1786128


GAMES ^

anthr6x
June 20th, 2011, 04:02 PM
Dependant on the user's ability to not click links they aren't familiar with (IE: Ads.) Or not installing good anti-malware software (COMODO, MSE, etc.)


This will be Black in Windows 8, and won't have the cool memory dump information.

........


1. correct me if I'm wrong, isn't the functionality of a malware or a virus based on the poor design or a weakness of the OS?

2. even better, BSD will still be BSD with Black instead Blue :razz:

3. "If any part of the driver code is malformed..." who's fault is this again??

4. I haven't had the chance to run an installation with an OEM, so can't make any comment about this.

5. "You must be root" only to perform high level transaction. once an application is installed, it doesn't ask every time you try to do something.

6. it is fairly simple to recover your installed OSs if one rendered unbootable. grub, lilo or loadlin (simply whatever your bootloader is) will only need to know where is your root partition, boot partition and names of the drivers image file (initrd) and linux kernel file(vmlinuz). but there are serious limitations playing around with windows bootloader.

7. there is a huge difference between being able to install a piece of software in a hardware platform and actually using it.

Dragonbite
June 20th, 2011, 04:14 PM
2. even better, BSD will still be BSD with Black instead Blue :razz:

I think you mean "BSoD", since BSD is a highly-regarded Unix cousin of Linux. ;)

anthr6x
June 20th, 2011, 04:30 PM
yeah, I wasn't talking about BSD as in OS.

Ian Clark
June 22nd, 2011, 01:18 PM
I used to make videos with me talking or singing with WMM, but with OpenShot lipsync is lost, so I can't do those kind of videos after switching to Ubuntu.

Ken UK
June 22nd, 2011, 01:39 PM
Sorry if someone has already mentioned this but for me the biggest thing (even bigger than games) is specialised software which for me is mainly design software for engineering.

AutoCAD is the most well known software package in that field, the other software isn't worth mentioning because people will not know it anyway, infact some of it is made by small companies locally.

The problem is these companies don't support Linux at all which is understandable to an extent, they don't have the money to develop it to support a hand full of users.

If I could run all the specialist software I need without problems (especially in my field of work) I wouldn't need Windows.

walt.smith1960
June 22nd, 2011, 02:06 PM
Sorry if someone has already mentioned this but for me the biggest thing (even bigger than games) is specialised software which for me is mainly design software for engineering.

AutoCAD is the most well known software package in that field, the other software isn't worth mentioning because people will not know it anyway, infact some of it is made by small companies locally.

The problem is these companies don't support Linux at all which is understandable to an extent, they don't have the money to develop it to support a hand full of users.

If I could run all the specialist software I need without problems (especially in my field of work) I wouldn't need Windows.

+1 on specialist software. I would be ASTOUNDED if this ran under WINE: http://jeppesen.com/support/technical_support_details.jsp?prodNameTxt2=JeppVie w%203
It barely runs under Windows :).

sanderd17
June 22nd, 2011, 02:25 PM
Does someone that needs windows software ever tries Crossover instead of wine?

Ken UK
June 22nd, 2011, 02:41 PM
It barely runs under Windows :).

Exacty, most the software I use barely runs on windows stable nevermind another platform so its not going to happen anytime soon.

Dragonbite
June 22nd, 2011, 02:55 PM
Does someone that needs windows software ever tries Crossover instead of wine?

I found it was a little bit better, and a little easier but did not run some Windows applications well enough for me.

oldsoundguy
June 22nd, 2011, 05:00 PM
Does someone that needs windows software ever tries Crossover instead of wine?

There are two versions of Crossover. One for gamers and one for business users. I got the FREE business version they were giving away a couple of years ago. They have kept it updated sporadically, but free.
But, I find I really do not use it. Having found programs in Linux that do as well or better than the Windows programs.

For the stuff that is touchy (such as plug ins for Adobe PS that I can not live without .. the Tiffen filter program is one), I have an old XP box that holds my photographic/graphics programs along with my PDA/GPS sync and my AV/midi studio programs (have to use that Windows based stuff in order to be able to exchange files (phone in my part.)

tommpogg
July 1st, 2011, 09:29 AM
I think this is the main limitation of Linux: a lot of commercial software wasn't written to run on Linux. For instance, games, professional software, hardware drivers (like winmodems).

Notice that this limitation is not due to the features of Linux but is due to the fact that Windows is the most used Operative Systems.

majorpay
July 1st, 2011, 04:21 PM
The bottom line is that if Linux did everything Windows did, Windows would be in the tank, because free vs paid is not even a question we have to ask ourselves.

That's like asking if I'd like to pay for my gasoline. No, duhhh... But I don't see a decent free alternative at the moment.

Gaming is #1, Photoshop #2, .NET framework #3 (although perhaps not as important on a standard PC), Silverlight #4 (like it or not, people need this - like my mom to fill out her time card at work, and Netflix).

You don't get to question or argue the gaming issue. It is 100% the reason why some of the most avid Linux users still run Windows.

DRM support still isn't there on Linux (and may never be), so your major broadcasters of TV over IP won't support it. The fault of Linux? Not necessarily, it's all about where the developer's bread is buttered.

oldsoundguy
July 1st, 2011, 05:11 PM
The bottom line is that if Linux did everything Windows did, Windows would be in the tank, because free vs paid is not even a question we have to ask ourselves.

That's like asking if I'd like to pay for my gasoline. No, duhhh... But I don't see a decent free alternative at the moment.

Gaming is #1, Photoshop #2, .NET framework #3 (although perhaps not as important on a standard PC), Silverlight #4 (like it or not, people need this - like my mom to fill out her time card at work, and Netflix).

You don't get to question or argue the gaming issue. It is 100% the reason why some of the most avid Linux users still run Windows.

DRM support still isn't there on Linux (and may never be), so your major broadcasters of TV over IP won't support it. The fault of Linux? Not necessarily, it's all about where the developer's bread is buttered.

Really good summation! I would change Photoshop to just Adobe (in general). Lots of graphics shops use a lot more than just Photoshop, and you CAN get a decent handle on some older versions of that by running it inside Wine. Problem is that most pro photographers and advanced amateurs use MORE than just Photoshop and those Adobe programs and the plug ins for those programs will not work in Wine nor will they work in Crossover (YET .. who knows what is down the road?)

Having said that, I use Linux about 95% of the time with the exception of those programs written for Windows that I find I need. And 99.9% of all on line activities. (Reasons: Adobe in the main .. some MIDI/audio stuff, PDA sync .. because the PDA/GPS runs a Windows OS, Intuit software because the ACCOUNTANT/banker/IRS requires it for file transferability, and MS Word.. same transferability issues.)
And old XP box in the corner and networked works just fine for those purposes!
Don't game, but do see the issues there, also.

Robert Moyse
July 2nd, 2011, 12:15 PM
The GIMP and inkscape combined are almost as good as Photoshop

oldsoundguy
July 2nd, 2011, 09:24 PM
The GIMP and inkscape combined are almost as good as Photoshop

Operative word ... "ALMOST" ... there are PLUG INS that will only work with Photo Shop (such as the Tiffen Filter program or Nikon Picture Project or Adobe Lightroom). But for the average point and shoot photographer, YES .. GIMP and Inkscape are MORE than enough.

beew
July 2nd, 2011, 09:39 PM
Operative word ... "ALMOST" ... there are PLUG INS that will only work with Photo Shop (such as the Tiffen Filter program or Nikon Picture Project or Adobe Lightroom). But for the average point and shoot photographer, YES .. GIMP and Inkscape are MORE than enough.

Most people don't use PhotoShop anyway, you have people who use it thinking that the whole universe revolves around them so the fact that PS doesn't work on Linux seems to be a big deal, it is not.

PhotoShop is not a common software by any account. For many who do use it they use may be < 10% of the functions and most likely from unlicensed source (I don't use the word "pirated", there is no moral equivalence to killing people at high sea while robbing them) Who would pay $700 usd for something like that unless it is needed for professional work?

I am actually happy that PS is not available in Linux so that free Softwares like Gimp would have a chance to develop and mature, otherwise many people would be using unlicensed copies of PS and this would hurt FOSS development.

el_koraco
July 3rd, 2011, 08:00 AM
Gaming is #1

Of all the things Linux lacks, gaming is the least important one, since it matters only to gamers, who make up a tiny percentage of the computer population.

Nyromith
July 3rd, 2011, 12:03 PM
Of all the things Linux lacks, gaming is the least important one, since it matters only to gamers, who make up a tiny percentage of the computer population.
-1
You can say it about every weak point of Linux.
I think games can boost Linux popularity a lot.

Robert Moyse
July 3rd, 2011, 12:15 PM
There's no such thing as pirated GIMP.

Lkm
July 3rd, 2011, 12:23 PM
Plays DVDs.

Or at least, I haven't figured out how to do that on linux yet.

chili555
July 3rd, 2011, 01:00 PM
Plays DVDs.

Or at least, I haven't figured out how to do that on linux yet.Open a terminal and do:
sudo apt-get install libdvdread4
sudo /usr/share/doc/libdvdread4/install-css.shOpen Movie Player or similar and enjoy.

Of course Ubuntu can play, rip, author, copy, burn, etc. DVDs!

smilinggoomba
July 3rd, 2011, 01:57 PM
Most people will prefer shooters and racing
That is NOT true. While many people like those games, many people also like platformer and puzzle games!

All that Windows has that Linux (Ubuntu) has is more apps, and more viruses.

Dragonbite
July 3rd, 2011, 02:13 PM
Most people will prefer shooters and racing games to puzzle games. ;)

Angry Birds.

Lucradia
July 3rd, 2011, 03:18 PM
That is NOT true. While many people like those games, many people also like platformer and puzzle games!

All that Windows has that Linux (Ubuntu) has is more apps, and more viruses.

Any Trojan can infect any file on linux with a windows-based virus. Trojans can not be stopped unless you have a firewall to stop them, as they are not "malicious" software.

Anyway, I'd play more RPGs, if linux had any. (Not The Mana World, or Planeshift.)

Wish Eden Eternal would work with Wine.

el_koraco
July 3rd, 2011, 03:38 PM
-1
You can say it about every weak point of Linux.
I think games can boost Linux popularity a lot.

Nah, but AutoCAD, functioning graphics drivers and stuff could.

nrundy
July 3rd, 2011, 03:59 PM
Windows gives fine grain control over applications' internet connections. Users can control whether or not an app can have internet access, when it can have internet access, under what circumstances it can have internet access, using what port, protocol, etc. Basically, the user can decide to allow App-1 to have internet access but deny it to App-2 and App-3.

Linux can't do this.

disabledaccount
July 3rd, 2011, 04:41 PM
Windows gives fine grain control over applications' internet connections. Users can control whether or not an app can have internet access, when it can have internet access, under what circumstances it can have internet access, using what port, protocol, etc. Basically, the user can decide to allow App-1 to have internet access but deny it to App-2 and App-3.

Linux can't do this.Buahaha!!! Please, Windows gained this "feature" long after Linux. Before that You have to use 3rd party software like Kerio or Comodo. In Linux we have full control over network, and applications can be blocked with SELinux, AppArmor, TuxGuardian (old but still working) and/or by blocking particular ports. Additionaly users and groups can be blocked - so, also applications run by them.

old_dog
July 3rd, 2011, 06:24 PM
I have been banging on about how like the Bee's Knees Linux indeed Ubuntu is, I have used Ubuntu for the last 5 or 6 years. Last week bought an HP slimline pavilion, Windows 7 loaded. This is more really what 11.04 doesn't do.
1) Blu-Ray doesn't workout with some major gymnastics.
2) Ralink PCI WiFi won't work without some more major jiggery-pokery on my behalf.
3) Nvidia video card, driver installed ....Installed but inactive??

All work perfectly in Windows 7

Have Ubuntu taken their eye off the ball, Hate to say this but by some form of osmosis may be tempted back to Windows.

I don't want to but there is only so much tinkering you want to do!

Dragonbite
July 3rd, 2011, 08:09 PM
All work perfectly in Windows 7

Of course it does... what buffoon would sell a computer system with pats of it not working? Doesn't really matter what OS it comes with, whatever one they build the machine for is the one that is going to run!

Can a System76 or ZaReason or any of the other Linux-OS systems run Windows XP or Windows 7 out of the box?

chili555
July 3rd, 2011, 08:36 PM
All work perfectly in Windows 7

Have Ubuntu taken their eye off the ball,To be a little too blunt, this is a variation of the tiresome demand that Ubuntu work with every 20-year-old SCSI card, every 15-year-old PCMCIA wireless card, every one-week-old 3G card and one-day-old multi-function printer for which the manufacturers steadfastly refuse to provide drivers or the manufacturer went belly-up ten years ago, and, if not, the developers are stupid, lazy slobs.
Ralink PCI WiFi won't work without some more major jiggery-pokery on my behalf. I have fiddled with a few wireless cards on these forums; your idea of 'major' must be different than mine. Do you believe your Ralink will work perfectly on another distribution? Which?

Before I bought my last two laptops, my prior research indicated that everything worked with Linux. I was not disappointed.

YigalB
July 3rd, 2011, 08:44 PM
To be a little too blunt, this is a variation of the tiresome demand that Ubuntu work with every 20-year-old SCSI card, every 15-year-old PCMCIA wireless card, every one-week-old 3G card and one-day-old multi-function printer for which the manufacturers steadfastly refuse to provide drivers or the manufacturer went belly-up ten years ago, and, if not, the developers are stupid, lazy slobs.

No need to be rude. The deveopers deserve all the credit, as Ubuntu is a great idea and OS.
The claim is simple: OS that is targeted to the people, should support as much as possible hardware. Unlike embedded OS, which needs to support only pre-known hardware.

If not, it is frastrating, and people don't like to be frastrated. Especially if the hardware was supported by previous Ubuntu version - happend to me.

oldsoundguy
July 3rd, 2011, 08:51 PM
I have become very accustomed to plugging a card into a Linux desktop build and booting up and having it work.

Just finished a 3 hour battle to put a super G PCI wireless card in a Windows XP-Pro SP3 box .. and it still will not accept the UTILITIES package. But it does work now. BUT 3 HOURS????????????
Had to get new drivers .. then burn the SPECIFIC driver package .. then install the thing as the original comes in the box disk was only good on SP2.

Lkm
July 3rd, 2011, 09:41 PM
Open a terminal and do:
sudo apt-get install libdvdread4
sudo /usr/share/doc/libdvdread4/install-css.shOpen Movie Player or similar and enjoy.


Didn't work with movie player, works perfectly with VLC though. Thank you!

peyre
July 3rd, 2011, 10:30 PM
Plays DVDs.

Or at least, I haven't figured out how to do that on linux yet.

Yes, I had that problem too! It turns out that out of the box, Ubuntu can't play encrypted DVDs. However you can install Medibuntu to get the necessary decrypters--once I did that, I could play professional movie DVDs.

Adding the Repository

The following bash command adds Medibuntu's repository to Ubuntu. It also adds Medibuntu's GPG key to your keyring, which is needed to authenticate the Medibuntu packages.

This command should be run in the Terminal (Applications → Accessories → Terminal):

sudo wget --output-document=/etc/apt/sources.list.d/medibuntu.list http://www.medibuntu.org/sources.list.d/$(lsb_release -cs).list && sudo apt-get --quiet update && sudo apt-get --yes --quiet --allow-unauthenticated install medibuntu-keyring && sudo apt-get --quiet update

Medibuntu's repository is deactivated by upgrading to a newer Ubuntu release, so you should run this command again after the release upgrade.

You may also wish to add the following packages. The first will cause many apps from the Medibuntu repository to appear in Ubuntu Software Center (Ubuntu 9.10+) or Add/Remove Applications (versions prior to 9.10). The second will allow users to generate crash reports against Medibuntu packages and submit them to the Medibuntu bugtracker.

sudo apt-get --yes install app-install-data-medibuntu apport-hooks-medibuntu

Please note you may have to use --force-yes instead of --yes in order for this command to succeed.

Playing Encrypted DVDs

To play encrypted DVDs, the libdvdcss2 package is essential. libdvdcss is a simple library designed for accessing DVDs like a block device without having to bother about the decryption. Some more information about this package can be found at http://www.videolan.org/developers/libdvdcss.html

Below are the instructions for installing the packages using the command line. For other methods, please refer to Installing Software.

With the entire Medibuntu repository

If you have added the entire Medibuntu repository, you just need to install the package using APT:

sudo apt-get install libdvdcss2

--------------------------------------
I'm having trouble finding my original source for it (I can send you a saved copy of the html file if you email me), but this one is close:
http://iamubuntu.blogspot.com/2009/03/mediubuntu-in-ubuntu.html

catlover2
July 3rd, 2011, 10:33 PM
For me, Windows can print to my Canon Pixma Pro9000 MkII, and Linux can't, except for Turboprint.(not free)

Lkm
July 3rd, 2011, 10:43 PM
Yes, I had that problem too! It turns out that out of the box, Ubuntu can't play encrypted DVDs. However you can install Medibuntu to get the necessary decrypters--once I did that, I could play professional movie DVDs.

Adding the Repository

The following bash command adds Medibuntu's repository to Ubuntu. It also adds Medibuntu's GPG key to your keyring, which is needed to authenticate the Medibuntu packages.

This command should be run in the Terminal (Applications → Accessories → Terminal):

sudo wget --output-document=/etc/apt/sources.list.d/medibuntu.list http://www.medibuntu.org/sources.list.d/$(lsb_release -cs).list && sudo apt-get --quiet update && sudo apt-get --yes --quiet --allow-unauthenticated install medibuntu-keyring && sudo apt-get --quiet update

Medibuntu's repository is deactivated by upgrading to a newer Ubuntu release, so you should run this command again after the release upgrade.

You may also wish to add the following packages. The first will cause many apps from the Medibuntu repository to appear in Ubuntu Software Center (Ubuntu 9.10+) or Add/Remove Applications (versions prior to 9.10). The second will allow users to generate crash reports against Medibuntu packages and submit them to the Medibuntu bugtracker.

sudo apt-get --yes install app-install-data-medibuntu apport-hooks-medibuntu

Please note you may have to use --force-yes instead of --yes in order for this command to succeed.

Playing Encrypted DVDs

To play encrypted DVDs, the libdvdcss2 package is essential. libdvdcss is a simple library designed for accessing DVDs like a block device without having to bother about the decryption. Some more information about this package can be found at http://www.videolan.org/developers/libdvdcss.html

Below are the instructions for installing the packages using the command line. For other methods, please refer to Installing Software.

With the entire Medibuntu repository

If you have added the entire Medibuntu repository, you just need to install the package using APT:

sudo apt-get install libdvdcss2

--------------------------------------
I'm having trouble finding my original source for it (I can send you a saved copy of the html file if you email me), but this one is close:
http://iamubuntu.blogspot.com/2009/03/mediubuntu-in-ubuntu.html

Hello, I just installed the libdvdread4 library and used VLC. This medibuntu package though, does it include anything that is useful for recognising ipods/iphones and moving files to them?

datenhalde
July 3rd, 2011, 11:35 PM
Before you all go blowing my head off, I am way pro-open-source, but my experience with Ubuntu so far (9.04) has been instabilities, completely frozen machine, unexpected reboots by the dozen, loss of keyboard and all around general frustration. Since Saturday, I've had to reinstall twice. Granted, my detective skills are not as great as some of the veterans but I have to say its been a minor nightmare.

All 'evil empire' talk aside - I've never had this much problem with windows. Ever.
Just sayin'.

Install different operating systems on different hardware often enough and sooner or later you will run into what you describe above with any of them, including any flavour of Windows. Can't say that I had tough installation probems more with one OS than with another.

Virgil0211
July 4th, 2011, 12:27 AM
So far, I haven't found any solution for stopping the screen tearing on my Nvidia Geforce m8200 card, so I guess that's one thing Windows can do that Linux can't. I mean, I've been trying for months to fix this damned thing, and I've been getting nothing at all.

Lkm
July 4th, 2011, 12:31 AM
With windows I had so many bluescreens, from which you can't easily recover data etc, whereas with linux, for a lot of boot problems you have the live sessions where you can just put a few lines of code into the terminal and it's fixed.

Granted, it has been a bit of a futtery process installing everything and getting little extra bits to work and fixing bits, but it has been a learning experience too :D

peyre
July 4th, 2011, 03:23 AM
Hello, I just installed the libdvdread4 library and used VLC. This medibuntu package though, does it include anything that is useful for recognising ipods/iphones and moving files to them?

That I don't know. I don't have an iPod or iPhone, so I haven't tried using them.

Dragonbite
July 4th, 2011, 03:51 AM
For me, Windows can print to my Canon Pixma Pro9000 MkII, and Linux can't, except for Turboprint.(not free)

Canon is not very supported with Linux, so I hear. My brother-in-law got a Canon and was dissapointed that it wasn't supported (no biggie.. he got it for practically free but still...)

peyre
July 4th, 2011, 03:58 AM
Canon is not very supported with Linux, so I hear.
That's ironic. Canon scanners seem to work well in Linux. You'd think printers would too.

tortugo23
July 4th, 2011, 05:09 AM
Canon is not very supported with Linux, so I hear. My brother-in-law got a Canon and was dissapointed that it wasn't supported (no biggie.. he got it for practically free but still...)

EPSON either apparently, at least not mine: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1774191&highlight=epson+printer+workforce

ecuasteelo
July 4th, 2011, 05:16 AM
Great thread.

I'm running Ubuntu 10.10

Play CBT Nugget videos. Some will respond ..use a virtual machine or Wine (which I could never get working for the life of me.)I do not want to use a virtual machine and install Windows on it, that would defeat the purpose of having Ubuntu.

What is the best program to use for ipod sync other than gtkpod?

Running blackberry desktop manager is another one.

If any one can provide a step by step on trying to get CBT Nuggets to play without a VM that would be great!! I have looked everywhere and nothing. Thank you.

trizrK
July 4th, 2011, 05:25 AM
Play games smoothly. And Linux cant install Silverlight, therefore Linux cannot stream any Netflix movies/games. I think that about sums it up? : - )

Lucradia
July 4th, 2011, 05:33 AM
Play games smoothly. And Linux cant install Silverlight, therefore Linux cannot stream any Netflix movies/games. I think that about sums it up? : - )

http://www.mono-project.com/Moonlight

and

http://www.google.com/search?q=netflix+html5

trizrK
July 4th, 2011, 05:40 AM
http://www.mono-project.com/Moonlight

and

http://www.google.com/search?q=netflix+html5
Yes, i knew they were moving towards using HTML5 but they still haven't offically added it yet. It may we awhile.

trizrK
July 4th, 2011, 05:42 AM
http://www.mono-project.com/Moonlight

and

http://www.google.com/search?q=netflix+html5
And i may have misunderstood, but Moonlight still doesnt work for the Netflix player.

themarker0
July 4th, 2011, 05:43 AM
Work on greater then 90% of new hardware.

peyre
July 4th, 2011, 06:16 AM
Play games smoothly. And Linux cant install Silverlight, therefore Linux cannot stream any Netflix movies/games. I think that about sums it up? : - )

Yeah well, from what I understand, that's a deliberate decision on Microsoft's part. Can't fault Linux for something Microsoft decided.

elliotn
July 4th, 2011, 09:04 AM
if ea fifa games could run on Linux
FL studio could run on Linux
then I wont boot into windows and don't tell me about wine

beew
July 4th, 2011, 10:23 AM
Work on greater then 90% of new hardware.

It does.

Dragonbite
July 4th, 2011, 02:41 PM
EPSON either apparently, at least not mine: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1774191&highlight=epson+printer+workforce

I haven't been to a store or run across it yet, but I've read Lexmark includs Linux in their supported operating systems on the box.

This is great news to legitimizing Linux, need to get more vendors to do this.

Redsoul90
July 4th, 2011, 04:32 PM
the thing that gets me is my professers want everything to be in microsoft format... to the best of my knowledge open/libre office is compatible.

AgentZ86
July 4th, 2011, 04:53 PM
The real question should be what windows can't do that linux can do.

I'm currently working with many different types of MP3 players zencast mostly and overdrive in which the public libraries require maximum overdrive etc.

The sync system for both windows media player and all other programs ever tried in which I have tried hundreds.

And they are so complicated to use and to navigate and never actually work right.

The either duplicate files, or erase files from one location that I wanted to keep.

Or worse they come up with incompatible file types all the time.

Some players won't play RM files while others won't play wma or wav files if you can believe it.

All of them come with some sort of converter, however they don't convert from a file type that the program cannot convert.

Which means basically the device is useless.

Now I can't say linux will do this either for all file types, however it does not take you hours to figure out if linux can or can't do it.

This is what I'm saying linux can tell you if your file is compatible or not and will work with your mp3 player/program up front, and windows won't / can't.

It takes hours of reading to find this out and it's not up front before buying the devices to use for your desired file formats.

Well that all I know

p1rat
July 4th, 2011, 08:42 PM
Directx is the only reason I still have a windows partition.

sammiev
July 4th, 2011, 09:52 PM
EPSON either apparently, at least not mine: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1774191&highlight=epson+printer+workforce

I found my Epson printer driver from the Epson web site (http://www.epsondevelopers.com/home/linux) that brought me to a third party driver which worked great. GL :)

peyre
July 5th, 2011, 05:12 AM
Directx is the only reason I still have a windows partition.

Funny, my Epson WorkForce 600 has Linux drivers. They were available on Epson's support site. 'Course, those were for the printer part. The scanner part of this all-in-one...not so much.

Rasa1111
July 5th, 2011, 05:15 AM
Q: What can Windows do that Linux can't?

A: Rob you .. :P

tortugo23
July 5th, 2011, 05:46 AM
I found my Epson printer driver from the Epson web site (http://www.epsondevelopers.com/home/linux) that brought me to a third party driver which worked great. GL :)

Thanks!

I will check that out! If I could use that printer, I would be more willing to work around the Mircosoft Office/LibreOffice formatting mess that happens while crossing platforms.

So far, for that, I have found that using tho old .doc extension keeps things ok. Or if you aren't collaborating, pdf always works to keep formatting. LibreOffice does some pretty random stuff, even within itself. Maybe I am just not familiar with it, but it seems pretty buggy.

Thanks again!

Rasa1111
July 5th, 2011, 05:48 AM
So far, for that, I have found that using tho old .doc extension keeps things ok. Or if you aren't collaborating, pdf always works to keep formatting. LibreOffice does some pretty random stuff, even within itself. Maybe I am just not familiar with it, but it seems pretty buggy.

I think so to.
I wondered if it was just "buggy" for me.

Bucky Ball
July 5th, 2011, 05:50 AM
High-end AV (reasonably) reliably. Things like Sibelius, ProTools, Premiere Pro ... there is just nothing that does the same job ... yet!

weasel fierce
July 5th, 2011, 05:58 AM
Somewhat relevant, here's a quote from one of the Penny Arcade guys from a few days ago


Meanwhile, Im sick of trying old versions of drivers or new versions or ******* experimental versions. I dont want to edit command lines or create .cfg files full of custom tweaks. I just want to play games. I guess I just bought the wrong machine or bought it at the wrong time... or maybe both.

It isn't all smooth sailing on the windows side

Dragonbite
July 5th, 2011, 01:39 PM
Thanks!

I will check that out! If I could use that printer, I would be more willing to work around the Mircosoft Office/LibreOffice formatting mess that happens while crossing platforms.

So far, for that, I have found that using tho old .doc extension keeps things ok. Or if you aren't collaborating, pdf always works to keep formatting. LibreOffice does some pretty random stuff, even within itself. Maybe I am just not familiar with it, but it seems pretty buggy.

Thanks again!

I set my OpenOffice/LibreOffice to default to .doc/.xls/.ppt so I don't have to think about it if/when I email it out to somebody.

I would love to find a script so I can make everybody's OpenOffice/LibreOffice default to the MS format because the kids are less likely to think of it this way. They click "Save" and close it down and figure it should work on other machines (library's, school's, etc.) Plus my wife has sent out a few attachments that people aren't able to (easily) open.

I'm about to set up a Windows machine for my wife as a "graphics computer" because Linux does not
Have anything that is as easy to use as Publisher, including image manipulation and layout controls. Scribus is too professionally orientated and OpenOffice is frustrating in a number of ways.
Print quality on my HP is slightly easier to control than in Linux and it seems to come out cleaner and printing on labels (business cards) are more accurate in Windows than in Linux.
Font rendering in Windows, though I always make sure I have Liberation and now Ubuntu fonts installed.

bmackin1
July 5th, 2011, 02:45 PM
There are a few specific proprietary win apps that don't run under Ubuntu, like Tivo Desktop and Logitech remote setup.

On the other hand, VirtualBox runs XP under Linux very well, and I will try to get those last few win apps running in a virtual machine.

tortugo23
July 5th, 2011, 08:08 PM
Thanks!

I will check that out! If I could use that printer, I would be more willing to work around the Mircosoft Office/LibreOffice formatting mess that happens while crossing platforms.

So far, for that, I have found that using tho old .doc extension keeps things ok. Or if you aren't collaborating, pdf always works to keep formatting. LibreOffice does some pretty random stuff, even within itself. Maybe I am just not familiar with it, but it seems pretty buggy.

Thanks again!

Uh oh, nope. Those are the drivers I am using that don't work. It prints, just ******. I need to find some that work without streaking. I think its the drivers because it prints fine in windows.

beew
July 5th, 2011, 08:19 PM
Uh oh, nope. Those are the drivers I am using that don't work. It prints, just ******. I need to find some that work without streaking
.

Erh.. I think you mean tweaking... Streaking means running around naked. :)

sammiev
July 5th, 2011, 09:28 PM
On my Epson I can print on DVDs and covers perfectly. GL :)

oldsoundguy
July 5th, 2011, 09:46 PM
Once again the woes of the 25 buck printer user!! LOL

If there are no drivers for that printer you bought at the Save-A-Lot bargain store or Goodwill, then scream to Apple!
CUPS printer drivers are written by Apple.

I mean, if you were running the show, would you spend time and money writing a driver for a printer that is better off as a truck chock since it has been superseded 3 or 4 times and never sold all that many in the first place?

The "it works on Windows" does not wash, as Microsoft does NOT write printer drivers .. the printer manufacturer writes the drivers and makes them available to Windows users.

If you are going to use Linux .. take a few minutes and find which printers work out of the box before you buy. Investing in a quality printer is just that .. investing! As a quality unit will outlast a half dozen computers. I have some 12 year old HP units working in Linux and working well!
If you are MIGRATING from Windows, and INSIST that that thing work and it is not on the Cups or Gutenprint list .. good luck!!

beew
July 5th, 2011, 09:56 PM
Once again the woes of the 25 buck printer user!! LOL



I picked up an epson all in one printer/scanner from the street and it works great in Ubuntu. :)

In Maverick I have to install the drivers manually and it works flawlessly, in Natty as soon as it is plugged in Additional Drivers popped up and offered to install the drivers. Works like a charm and costs $0. :)

tortugo23
July 6th, 2011, 12:24 AM
Once again the woes of the 25 buck printer user!! LOL

If you are MIGRATING from Windows, and INSIST that that thing work and it is not on the Cups or Gutenprint list .. good luck!!

'tis a fine brand new printer (less than 6 months). You got it right, I had it before switching to Ubuntu. Had I known, I would have checked for compatibility. The thing is I would have been fooled anyway, the drivers do exist for it, they simply work crappy.

All is well except for color printing and scanning. Wireless even works. When printing in color there are lines through the print every inch or so. Scanning simply doesn't work. It all works fine in Windows XP except for the wireless (go figure).

Ubuntu is great, just not for me to do serious work. Great for websurfing, listening to music and light stuff. Seems great for my netbook, once I get into serious work it falls apart fast. Could be 'cause I am not a programmer, or that I am unfamiliar with the programs.

peyre
July 6th, 2011, 04:18 AM
Erh.. I think you mean tweaking... Streaking means running around naked. :)

Not in this case. He means that the printout is streaked with ink.

peyre
July 6th, 2011, 04:19 AM
Erh.. I think you mean tweaking... Streaking means running around naked. :)

Not in this case. He means that the printout is streaked with ink.

wolfen69
July 6th, 2011, 08:05 AM
I can't believe this is my first post in this thread. Umm, wait a minute, I remember now!. Meet ya in another thread.

nrundy
July 9th, 2011, 02:20 PM
Buahaha!!! Please, Windows gained this "feature" long after Linux. Before that You have to use 3rd party software like Kerio or Comodo. In Linux we have full control over network, and applications can be blocked with SELinux, AppArmor, TuxGuardian (old but still working) and/or by blocking particular ports. Additionaly users and groups can be blocked - so, also applications run by them.

Would you kindly direct me where I can learn how to do this stuff? Configuring AppArmor is a chore. I'm not knowledgable enough to do this. Remember, I can do ports, what I can't do in Linux is make an app "ask permission" before connecting to the internet. Please give info if I can do this in linux. thanks

peyre
July 11th, 2011, 03:41 AM
Would you kindly direct me where I can learn how to do this stuff? Configuring AppArmor is a chore. I'm not knowledgable enough to do this. Remember, I can do ports, what I can't do in Linux is make an app "ask permission" before connecting to the internet. Please give info if I can do this in linux. thanks

Sorry nrudny, I can't find your original post. If you're looking for the application to configure the Ubutntu firewall, it's Firestarter, available in the Ubuntu Software Repository.

Spice Weasel
July 11th, 2011, 11:20 AM
Sorry nrudny, I can't find your original post. If you're looking for the application to configure the Ubutntu firewall, it's Firestarter, available in the Ubuntu Software Repository.



Stable release: 1.0.3 (January 29, 2005)
Preview release: None
Development status: discontinued

Lucradia
July 11th, 2011, 12:47 PM
Windows can play RPG Maker games. Linux can't. It's the Runtime that is at fault, not the actual RPG Maker. The Wine forum guys didn't get that through their head, they think RPG Maker itself as at fault, and replied "RPG Maker is not free, we cannot test this issue." They promptly closed the ticket.

Dragonbite
July 11th, 2011, 01:58 PM
Give my wife the confidence of working with a program she feels comfortable with. She enjoyed "playing around" with it so much she stayed up waaaay past when she usually conks-out.

The program in questions is Publisher 2010. OO.org Draw doesn't compare (yet) but is probably the closest (Scribus is too "professional").

AgentZ86
July 11th, 2011, 04:22 PM
Give my wife the confidence of working with a program she feels comfortable with. She enjoyed "playing around" with it so much she stayed up waaaay past when she usually conks-out.

The program in questions is Publisher 2010. OO.org Draw doesn't compare (yet) but is probably the closest (Scribus is too "professional").

try kompozer it's simple to use and easily makes html pages if thats what your after.

Dragonbite
July 11th, 2011, 04:39 PM
try kompozer it's simple to use and easily makes html pages if thats what your after.

Converting from HTML to print is a royal pain in the butt without some good CSS involved.

She isn't doing too much really crazy, but little features like image frames and previewing your changes before they are committed (highlight some text, click the font drop-down list and as you hover over each the highlighted text will change to that so you can see how it looks, but it isn't committed until you actually click it. Same for font sizes and more).

I know a lot of people look down on Publisher, but it really isn't so bad for desktop publishing and layout.

ninjaaron
July 11th, 2011, 06:02 PM
Put content on or update a new iPhone/Pad/Pod.

tortugo23
July 11th, 2011, 06:24 PM
In Windows I set my laptop to hibernate when I close the lid. When I shut the lid it hibernates.

In Ubuntu I set my laptop to hibernate when I close the lid. When I shut the lid it force quits, improperly closing programs, and losing data.

MrGreen1
July 11th, 2011, 07:29 PM
the games on the android phones are ok though like Modern Combat or w/e and NOVA is alright.

k.mooijman
July 11th, 2011, 08:01 PM
For me the one thing linux can't do what windows can is treat you like a complete idiot.
linux can be sometimes a bit difficult to master but at least is expects your thinking.

Dragonbite
July 11th, 2011, 08:30 PM
For me the one thing linux can't do what windows can is treat you like a complete idiot.
linux can be sometimes a bit difficult to master but at least is expects your thinking.

Some of the people complaining about Ubuntu "dumbing-down" Linux may disagree.

mkstallings1
July 11th, 2011, 09:04 PM
I haven't looked through all the pages on this topic, but my only gripe is AUTOCAD. If I could get it working on Linux, then my windows days would be over.

krishna.988
July 12th, 2011, 05:33 AM
Why you people are engaging in such discussions time and again?

Windows is different and Linux is different..Both have its own applications and audiences...

Pls stop discussing this kind of stuff again and again..


POINTLESS DISCUSSION..

Dragonbite
July 12th, 2011, 01:38 PM
Why you people are engaging in such discussions time and again?

Windows is different and Linux is different..Both have its own applications and audiences...

Pls stop discussing this kind of stuff again and again..


POINTLESS DISCUSSION..

Then ignore the thread. You see it as pointless, obviously others do not so please stop imposing your values on others.

Thank you.

AgentZ86
July 12th, 2011, 06:10 PM
Windows can make you very grumpy, and have less friends, and and causes ED lol.

Linux can't do that.

nrundy
July 13th, 2011, 02:36 PM
Another thing I can't do in Ubuntu that bums me out is not being able to view mp3 and mp4 tags with Nautilus.

It makes it impossible to know which podcast/song to delete on my Sony Walkman because with mp3 tag reading I can't even see what TITLE I'm deleting.

And I have no way to sort or view Title or Genre etc with mp4 tagged videos.

Ultimately, it really makes Nautilus an incomplete File Browser.

For all mp3 and mp4 tag related files I find myself having to use Windows 7 to get anything done :(

nrundy
July 13th, 2011, 03:09 PM
Sorry nrudny, I can't find your original post. If you're looking for the application to configure the Ubutntu firewall, it's Firestarter, available in the Ubuntu Software Repository.




Stable release: 1.0.3 (January 29, 2005)
Preview release: None
Development status: discontinued


Guys, I don't use Firestarter because it has been discontinued. I use GUFW.

The problem I'm having is that none of the GNU-Linux Firewall apps and logs tell the user about applications. For example, if I use a whitelist and only open the ports needed for the apps I want connecting, it makes it really hard to know what ports to allow when no prompt occurs alerting me to what application is wanting to use that port and nothing in the logs reports applications. And further, I have no way to allow individual applications. If I open a port, all applications that use that port can connect to the internet, even if I only want one application to have permission to connect to the internet. Additionally, none of the firewall log file viewers I've tried (I've tried dozens) show what application was blocked (or allowed). They just show a connection saying IP-This and Port-That was blocked (or allowed) with no reference to the application. I've found this has become a major issue when I'm using a laptop on a Cellular Broadband plan that has data usage limits in place. If I open a port for Application-A, Applications-B, C, and D can all start connecting and eating up my broadband minutes. Personally, I think this is one of the biggest shortcomings of gnu-linux.


PS: I got one of my friends to try Ubuntu last month. He ended up dumping Ubuntu for Windows 7 primarily because of the lack of a firewall that can control applications. He complained to me that he doesn't care about Port numbers; he cares about Applications. He said he wants to allow Firefox to connect, just Firefox. But if he opens port 80, anything that uses port 80 can connect. He felt Windows gave him more control over his computer. I didn't argue with him very much because I essentially agreed with him. But he also agreed with me that Ubuntu was a well running OS. He especially liked Unity and even preferred it to the interface of Windows 7. He also loved how well integrated the top panel indicators were and the ease of setup and breadth of driver functionality. He thought the Launcher hide behavior was genius. He said he's going to try Ubuntu again in the future IF they develop a way to control what apps can and cannot connect to the internet.

krishna.988
July 14th, 2011, 06:55 AM
Then ignore the thread. You see it as pointless, obviously others do not so please stop imposing your values on others.

Thank you.

Excuse Me.. Dragonbite... I did'nt impose any values on you... Think before you say something OK????

Dragonbite
July 14th, 2011, 04:18 PM
Pls stop discussing this kind of stuff again and again..

Hmm.. you mean like getting onto a thread to say "Pls stop discussing this kind if stuff again and again.." instead of just ignoring it and letting the people who may think this is a worthwhile discussion to discuss it?

irv
July 14th, 2011, 05:53 PM
Why you people are engaging in such discussions time and again?

Windows is different and Linux is different..Both have its own applications and audiences...

Pls stop discussing this kind of stuff again and again..


POINTLESS DISCUSSION..

Not so! It is not pointless. If a thread goes this long and with these many posts it must be worth discussing. Just close your eyes and go away and other will continue on.

ninjaaron
July 14th, 2011, 07:43 PM
Not thanks to MS (directly), but Windows works with just about every piece of hardware and peripheral in existence.

Linux does not. I speak from experience. Damn you egalax!!

Lucradia
July 15th, 2011, 12:27 PM
just about

Key phrase there.

oldsoundguy
July 15th, 2011, 12:44 PM
Not thanks to MS (directly), but Windows works with just about every piece of hardware and peripheral in existence.

Again, someone that does not understand that Microsoft does NOT write drivers for hardware. Hardware manufacturers write software (drivers) for their hardware.

That same hardware could be made to run in Linux if the makers wanted it to run in Linux.

Instead, the code writers for Linux attempt to do their work for them. MOST of the time they succeed, (and VERY well in the desktop area!) but their biggest problems are in the very proprietary nature of LAPTOPS. It is a constant game of catchup as the makers change their minds on how things are to be run in order to stay ahead of or at least COMPETE with other makers.

mkstallings1
July 15th, 2011, 01:02 PM
If as many people were writing code to make some obscure piece of hardware work with Linux as there are people ensuring it works with Windows, then we would never run into that problem. It is amazing to me how, using mostly volunteer efforts, Linux "just works" most of the time. It is also amazing how, when it doesn't work,you can usually find someone to help you make it work.

chili555
July 15th, 2011, 01:03 PM
but their biggest problems are in the very proprietary nature of LAPTOPS. It is a constant game of catchup as the makers change their minds on how things are to be run in order to stay ahead of or at least COMPETE with other makers.And if you look around on the Networking and Wireless forum for 'dell-laptop,' 'acer-wmi' and 'hp-wmi' you will see that the module developers are woefully behind.

Tibuda
July 15th, 2011, 11:41 PM
Again, someone that does not understand that Microsoft does NOT write drivers for hardware. Hardware manufacturers write software (drivers) for their hardware.

That same hardware could be made to run in Linux if the makers wanted it to run in Linux.

Instead, the code writers for Linux attempt to do their work for them. MOST of the time they succeed, (and VERY well in the desktop area!) but their biggest problems are in the very proprietary nature of LAPTOPS. It is a constant game of catchup as the makers change their minds on how things are to be run in order to stay ahead of or at least COMPETE with other makers.
ninjaaron does understand that. he said "Not thanks to MS".

it just does not matter for the end user if it is MS or the manufacturer. what matters is if the hardware works or not.

JACKONFIRE1888
July 16th, 2011, 02:21 AM
The main thing windows can do that Ubuntu is incapable of is access Facebook and let search for friends or send gifts or simply play games, every time I try to do any of those the screen goes grey and the system crashes, that never happens on Windows.

oldsoundguy
July 16th, 2011, 03:05 AM
The main thing windows can do that Ubuntu is incapable of is access Facebook and let search for friends or send gifts or simply play games, every time I try to do any of those the screen goes grey and the system crashes, that never happens on Windows.

I have zero problems with Facebook other than it sometimes has a huge memory leak, and their photo uploads DO crash .. but that is not Ubuntu's fault. But I use a dual core processor with a gang of memory.

Dragonbite
July 16th, 2011, 01:39 PM
The main thing windows can do that Ubuntu is incapable of is access Facebook and let search for friends or send gifts or simply play games, every time I try to do any of those the screen goes grey and the system crashes, that never happens on Windows.

I had something like that with Firefox on Ubuntu until it would crash right after opening. It was running on 10.04 LTS and if you're having the same problem look up how to upgrade to Firefox 4 (or 5). That seemed to fix it for me.

Meanwhile I just used Chromium and it worked fine. That's why I say it was Firefox and since it was Ubuntu 10.04, it was Firefox 3.x. So I didn't mind having to "upgrade" Firefox anyway (and glad I didn't have to upgrade the whole system either.. I'm waiting until next Aprile ;) )

k.mooijman
July 16th, 2011, 02:04 PM
A little reply on the driver the driver issue:

Whoever is responsible for the drivers a fact is that when i boot linux it supports about 95% of the hardware i have WITHOUT asking me for drivers.
in rare cases of proprietary drivers it asks me if i would like to use the available drivers
my experience with windows is that i MAY NOT connect the hardware before i have run the driver installation process.
and in cases i have lost the driver disk i need to search the web for the appropriate software
this for me is a great pro!!!

disabledaccount
July 18th, 2011, 03:28 AM
A little reply on the driver the driver issue:

Whoever is responsible for the drivers a fact is that when i boot linux it supports about 95% of the hardware i have WITHOUT asking me for drivers.
in rare cases of proprietary drivers it asks me if i would like to use the available drivers
my experience with windows is that i MAY NOT connect the hardware before i have run the driver installation process.
and in cases i have lost the driver disk i need to search the web for the appropriate software
this for me is a great pro!!!
And that is perfectly true...
I would say that problems with drivers are almost equal on Win and linux, only different HW is affected in different ways. But peoples who owned 2 PCs in their whole life can claim that Win works with every HW :) It's also worth to mention that with latest ubuntu we can use very old HW (still working printers, modems, VGA's etc) - thanks to open drivers, while on windows those devices are unusable, because proprietary drivers are not developed anymore. Furthermore, I can install latest ubuntu on my 10 years old Toshiba and it will work with reasonable speed, fully working multimedia keys, card reader, GFX-card, etc - Win7 won't even install and XP is deadly slow. This makes huge difference for many peoples who don't have money for new HW.

k.mooijman
July 18th, 2011, 11:10 AM
And that is perfectly true...

Thanks for this support !
an other good thing about linux drivers system is the fact is detects the hardware on each boot. this makes it possible to fit my hard-disc into an other computer without noticing the difference ( except proprietary video drivers ).
as for Windows i was not able to boot the O.S. on different hardware and had to fresh install it.

peyre
July 18th, 2011, 04:00 PM
Thanks for this support !
an other good thing about linux drivers system is the fact is detects the hardware on each boot. this makes it possible to fit my hard-disc into an other computer without noticing the difference ( except proprietary video drivers ).
as for Windows i was not able to boot the O.S. on different hardware and had to fresh install it.

Yes, that's one advantage to Unix-type operating systems. Windows is much more specific about the machine it's on. This is changing though--Windows Vista and 7 are much more like Unix in that regard. That's good news for us at work, but personally I'm always disappointed to see Windows catch up to Unix in anything Unix was better at.

FATeam
July 18th, 2011, 04:43 PM
Play video with WMP (jk)

Drefhill
August 4th, 2011, 01:49 PM
Im a poker player and a lot of poker softwares doesnt works well with Ubuntu even in Play on linux or wine.

I cant found a good ODDS, Tracker, and HUD who works well with Ubuntu.

Trompette83
August 5th, 2011, 01:45 PM
Scan my documents with my Canon Canoscan D1250U2.

:(

Any driver now?
Do I have to bin it?

irv
August 5th, 2011, 02:29 PM
Scan my documents with my Canon Canoscan D1250U2.

:(

Any driver now?
Do I have to bin it?

Every scanner I have tried with Ubuntu worked. I just plug them in run xsane and it finds it. I have found some older scanner at used stores for a couple of dollars and they work great. One was a canon U660. I guess I never tried a Canoscan D1250u2. I never had to load any driver for any of the scanners.

Dragonbite
August 6th, 2011, 01:46 PM
Scan my documents with my Canon Canoscan D1250U2.

:(

Any driver now?
Do I have to bin it?

Earlier Linux could not find my scanner properly, and it was a major pain.

Now it finds it, and the software included in Linux is equal or better than the scanning software included for Windows.

Derek Karpinski
August 12th, 2011, 08:01 PM
Resume from suspend.:(

scania_gti
August 12th, 2011, 08:07 PM
Windows can make defragment half a day and oher half - checking for viruses; Linux can't!!! :(:mad:](*,)

snip3r8
August 12th, 2011, 09:21 PM
Spread Libraries and include directories all over the place

jago25_98
August 12th, 2011, 10:11 PM
Found another example of specialist software:

Phone System Analysis Software - PSAS (http://psas.revskills.de/?q=node/6)

Please let me know if there's an alternative. Perhaps I can navigate firmware with some linux tools of some sort. There's usually something non GUI available as an alternative

westie457
August 12th, 2011, 10:44 PM
Empty my bank account !!!

gordintoronto
August 13th, 2011, 02:13 AM
Windows can run QQQ. If you're Chinese (like my wife) you need QQQ.

Famicube64
August 13th, 2011, 05:02 AM
Windows can make defragment half a day and oher half - checking for viruses; Linux can't!!! :(:mad:](*,)
You're telling me that the ability to defragment is bad? lol

abdul wahab
August 13th, 2011, 12:48 PM
well linux can do most of me but one thing that i love most about linux is that my windows 7 does not support my laptops bluetooth but linux is supporting it.
Gaming is a big issue but most of the linux users are programmers and gaming is not an issue for them thats why gaming is not much developed in linux.

chili555
August 13th, 2011, 01:35 PM
but most of the linux users are programmers My wife surfs the web, emails, Skypes with the kids, Facebooks with the grandchildren, etc., loves her Ubuntu and is not a programmer. My point is not to show one example that disproves the theory, but to illustrate that most of the activities that lots of ordinary users use computers for are accomplished quite well in Linux.

Mrs. Chili is a happy camper.

Dragonbite
August 13th, 2011, 04:48 PM
My wife surfs the web, emails, Skypes with the kids, Facebooks with the grandchildren, etc., loves her Ubuntu and is not a programmer. My point is not to show one example that disproves the theory, but to illustrate that most of the activities that lots of ordinary users use computers for are accomplished quite well in Linux.

Mrs. Chili is a happy camper.

That's why Netbooks meets the needs of so many people! Some people have realized that you don't have to keep upping and upping the stats on the computer, to do what you want. Instead the focus was shifted to longer battery life and lighter weight.

So far my Cr-48 Chromebook does most of that (maybe not Skype video, but Google chat and Google+ hangouts instead).

oldsoundguy
August 13th, 2011, 08:32 PM
well linux can do most of me but one thing that i love most about linux is that my windows 7 does not support my laptops bluetooth but linux is supporting it.

"""Gaming is a big issue but most of the linux users are programmers and gaming is not an issue for them thats why gaming is not much developed in linux."""

Completely erroneous assumptions.
The only "programming" I do is sometime cut and paste in terminal. The only code that I am conversant with is HTML.

Gaming is not geared to Linux users .. true .. but not the fault of the Linux programmers. Games are third party programs written by game writers. The market of games in Linux is small compared to all others. About 1 1/2% of ALL desktops/Laptops in the world run Linux. Of those users, the percentage of gamers runs just about as big as the percentage of Windows gamers .. no more than an estimated 20% (most people/businesses that use computers are NOT gamers. They do actual computing WORK on their machines.
So 20% of 1 1/2% is not a significant market to be spending valuable programming hours to address.
If you don't like that, then start writing games for Linux and see how much money you will make. You MIGHT make enough to feed your cat.

irv
August 13th, 2011, 09:06 PM
I just bought a digital touch pad for ebooks. And I get ebooks from the local library. To upload them to this unit I need to use Adobe Digital software along with Overdrive media console. This all requires Windows or Mac OS, Again Linux is left in the cold. It is things like this that make me keep Windows installed along with Linux on my laptop.

theDaveTheRave
August 13th, 2011, 09:13 PM
So 20% of 1 1/2% is not a significant market to be spending valuable programming hours to address.
If you don't like that, then start writing games for Linux and see how much money you will make. You MIGHT make enough to feed your cat.


You made me laugh.... something that doesn't happen on windows forums (least ways not in my personal experiece).

On the gaming front, and with the exceptions of the MS's Xbox (which I assume runs some form of 'gaming optimised windows') what sort of OS do the big game consoles use?

I've tried a quick google, but there seems to be not much technical infor....

David

snip3r8
August 14th, 2011, 08:12 AM
You made me laugh.... something that doesn't happen on windows forums (least ways not in my personal experiece).

On the gaming front, and with the exceptions of the MS's Xbox (which I assume runs some form of 'gaming optimised windows') what sort of OS do the big game consoles use?

I've tried a quick google, but there seems to be not much technical infor....

David

1 : I think Sony and Nintendo have their own thing going on.

2: Windows forums can be extremely funny(if you find stupid people saying stupid things funny).

jtarin
August 14th, 2011, 08:51 AM
Windows can BSOD without applying it as a wallpaper.

irv
August 14th, 2011, 02:06 PM
One thing windows does well is takes up a lot of my time. I don't use it often, but when I do it is always way behind on updates. I boot into it, do what I have to do and get out. But when I get out, it tells me not to shut down the computer because it is installing all these updates. I have to wait and wait and wait until it is done. Then the next time I need to use it again, I need to wait and wait and wait again until it finishes all these updates.

In Ubuntu Linux it only take a few minutes to do the updates and the only time I need to do any rebooting is when I have changes to the kernel.

Windows is a pain in the you know what.

peyre
August 14th, 2011, 05:34 PM
Windows can BSOD without applying it as a wallpaper.

Bluescreens have been mentioned many times on this thread. Thing is, Linux has its own equivalent, the kernel panic. We just don't see it as often.

Nightstrike2009
August 14th, 2011, 05:37 PM
"Blue screen of death" for no reason at all, with no warning either. (Sorry about that couldn't resist it) ;-) LOL

d3v1150m471c
August 14th, 2011, 06:10 PM
As a base system, i feel that windows is an inferior product. Now if you start talking about third-party software, then it becomes at matter of preference and what OS the software runs on.

sammiev
August 14th, 2011, 06:57 PM
"Blue screen of death" for no reason at all, with no warning either. (Sorry about that couldn't resist it) ;-) LOL

99.9% of the times the Blue screen of death is just an old driver that needs to be updated. GL :)

Thewhistlingwind
August 14th, 2011, 07:22 PM
Gaming is not geared to Linux users .. true .. but not the fault of the Linux programmers. Games are third party programs written by game writers. The market of games in Linux is small compared to all others. About 1 1/2% of ALL desktops/Laptops in the world run Linux. Of those users, the percentage of gamers runs just about as big as the percentage of Windows gamers .. no more than an estimated 20% (most people/businesses that use computers are NOT gamers. They do actual computing WORK on their machines.
So 20% of 1 1/2% is not a significant market to be spending valuable programming hours to address.
If you don't like that, then start writing games for Linux and see how much money you will make. You MIGHT make enough to feed your cat.

This.

Your only hope is to write them in a platform agnostic way, which is itself harder than NOT doing that.

Dragonbite
August 15th, 2011, 03:22 AM
As a base system, i feel that windows is an inferior product. Now if you start talking about third-party software, then it becomes at matter of preference and what OS the software runs on.

True. If I could, I would run Office, Visual Studio, Photoshop and other applications on top of Linux (natively, not using Wine).

ninjaaron
August 15th, 2011, 04:30 AM
Resume from suspend.:(

If you do a google search for your exact problem, 9/10 chance that it's a well known bug with an easy fix. I've had this problem in the past, and the solution was always mind-numbingly simple once I actually looked for it.

Dragonbite
August 15th, 2011, 01:11 PM
If you do a google search for your exact problem, 9/10 chance that it's a well known bug with an easy fix. I've had this problem in the past, and the solution was always mind-numbingly simple once I actually looked for it.

Makes you wonder why it isn't set in the first place?

siddharthshetty
August 15th, 2011, 03:19 PM
Video editing .
But ubuntu has enough options for video fx compositing.
The only thing missing is after effects rest all other leading compositing software like Nuke , Fusion , Blender , autodesk Smoke are available for linux. which makes it amazing. But as soon as novacut comes to linux we will see a huge rise in linux usership.
if you dont know mac's became popular after fcp became a cheap alternative for avid.

Derek Karpinski
August 15th, 2011, 07:33 PM
If you do a google search for your exact problem, 9/10 chance that it's a well known bug with an easy fix. I've had this problem in the past, and the solution was always mind-numbingly simple once I actually looked for it.

Really? It's that easy?.........huh......I guess the countless mega threads here and across the net are all because we just didn't google enough.

sarcasm aside, I wish canonical would focus on the basic functionality of the OS, and not so much on the 'eye candy' stuff.

snip3r8
August 15th, 2011, 07:41 PM
If you do a google search for your exact problem, 9/10 chance that it's a well known bug with an easy fix. I've had this problem in the past, and the solution was always mind-numbingly simple once I actually looked for it.

My windows once did not resume from suspend,it didn't even want to boot again until i reset the BIOS!

x-shaney-x
August 15th, 2011, 07:43 PM
Well judging by the current state of unity in Oneiric they are lacking in the eyecandy stuff too :P

By I have to largely agree, I have had my fair share of problems in linux and about 90% of them have been solved with the help of google and forums.
But there are still certain things I can't do in linux and no amount of googling has solved those.

But then again, who wants to spend all their computer time googling problems if that time could be spent using something that just works for them.
I'm all for showing people linux and even installing it on their computers to show them what it's like but I don't see the point of trying to convince or persuade people it is better or is the right thing for them because it just might not be.

JRV
August 15th, 2011, 09:24 PM
I keep a Windows machine for a print server.
I need Windows to print CD labels for my Epson R200 printer.
It prints photos better in Windows than in Linux.

Cups is maintained by Apple, which I trust considerably less than my health care provider, the U.S. government, and the Russian mob.

Dragonbite
August 16th, 2011, 12:43 AM
I keep a Windows machine for a print server.
I need Windows to print CD labels for my Epson R200 printer.
It prints photos better in Windows than in Linux.

Cups is maintained by Apple, which I trust considerably less than my health care provider, the U.S. government, and the Russian mob.

In that order ;) ?

I find handling even HP printers to be better in Windows than in Linux. And it isn't a new HP either.

Just tonight I tried printing and it would not printer from OpenOffice. I had to convert it to PDF in order to print it.

JRV
August 16th, 2011, 01:18 AM
In that order ;) ?


The order from most to least trustworthy:

Microsoft (I have very little trust for Microsoft)
The Russian mob
My health care provider
The U.S government
Apple

Or do the insurance companies run the U.S. government?

peyre
August 16th, 2011, 05:34 AM
Makes you wonder why it isn't set in the first place?

Oh snap! You got that one right, Dragonbite. I've wondered that myself. It seems like there are several fairly common issues out there that would be pretty simple for Ubuntu to address either automatically, or through a simple GUI. And yet I have to google them and enter cryptic stuff at the command line. Not that I'm afraid of the command line--I'd just rather do it in the GUI--and more to the point, I'm not going to set up Ubuntu for the grandmother next door if she's going to run into things that she can't fix in a GUI.

Derek Karpinski is right; I agree that Canonical would do well to focus on this kind of user-experience stuff and let the eye candy sell itself. Not that Canonical has been a slacker on the user-friendliness side, but a few tweaks here and there would do a lot for Ubuntu's "it just works" experience.

peyre
August 16th, 2011, 05:42 AM
Or do the insurance companies run the U.S. government?

Actually they do, along with the other big companies out there. The way our campaign system is structured, a candidate has to have enormous sums of money to be elected or reelected. Almost always, that kind of money isn't $10 and $20 donations from us small-means people, but big companies that give in the hundreds of thousands. When you donate that big, realistically you're buying access to the office holder with favors owed.

Contrary to popular conception, the problem isn't that being in office necessarily makes people corrupt--the problem is that the reality of our campaigns requires office holders to be beholden to the deep pockets. As a result, the big companies effectively own Congress, and it shows. What we really need, I think, is substantial campaign reform to remove most of the money from campaigns--but unfortunately, the Supreme Court recently ruled anything like that unconstitutional.

Ghost|BTFH
August 16th, 2011, 03:38 PM
One thing Windows can do that Linux can't - Lure gaming companies to make epic games for the operating system.

That's not gonna change for a long while.

yuler
August 29th, 2011, 01:21 AM
the problem is that the reality of our campaigns requires office holders to be beholden to the deep pockets.

Desired, yes. Required, no. Government is force and force can be bought to shape rules to the highest bidder. Rather than protect natural rights, government is abused to protect special interests.

I now return the topic.

kyletstrand
August 29th, 2011, 03:50 AM
One thing Windows can do that Linux can't - Lure gaming companies to make epic games for the operating system.

That's not gonna change for a long while.

I'm afraid you are correct. Unless Linux can acquire about 100,000,000 more experienced Linux users in the next few months.

hotshot247
August 29th, 2011, 01:34 PM
people started making linux run files for commercial games so we can play those same games in linux. like id software among many others. here is just a few games that i was talking about. their are many more though, you just have to search for them. you don't have to download the whole game if you already have the windows one, just that run file which is really small. then it'll be a native linux game and not a game that's run through wine. linux is moving up in the world.
http://www.icculus.org/lgfaq/gamelist.php?license=commercial

beew
August 29th, 2011, 06:51 PM
Well the Mac is not exactly a gaming platform either, that doesn't seem to bother Apple users. I think some people are making way too much out of games just because they are gamers.

snip3r8
August 29th, 2011, 07:13 PM
Well the Mac is not exactly a gaming platform either, that doesn't seem to bother Apple users. I think some people are making way too much out of games just because they are gamers.

mac however does now support steam and many users dual boot.

beew
August 29th, 2011, 07:18 PM
mac however does now support steam and many users dual boot.

Well dual boot won't be Mac anymore, you can always dual boot on Linux too.

BTW, it should be Steam supports Mac rather than Mac supports Steam. Small but important difference, it is not because of anything that Apple does that Steam is available on the Mac, for the same reason it is not a short coming of Ubuntu (or Linux in general) that Steam is not available for Ubuntu users (or Linux users)

Dragonbite
August 29th, 2011, 07:47 PM
Well the Mac is not exactly a gaming platform either, that doesn't seem to bother Apple users. I think some people are making way too much out of games just because they are gamers.

Thank you!

Although Mac does benefit from graphic and media programs that are available for Mac only (iWork, iLife, etc.) or Mac and Windows (Adobe, Office, iTunes, etc.)

For me, I have found Windows better with graphics and that is without high-end applications like Photoshop, InDesign, etc.

benny6669
August 29th, 2011, 07:56 PM
It seems to me that the gaming community these days favors consoles for the newest games (i.e. the games that won't easily run on Linux). Hardcore, competitive PC gamers do enough configuration and customization to their Windows setups that an "average" PC user wouldn't be willing or able to get them working at that level anyway. Let's try to remember, die-hard PC gamers like this are a tiny fraction of the computer-using world; they're not even a large percent of the general video-game market.

Games are usually the first answer to the question of "What can't Linux do?", but for most gaming (even "casual" FPS gaming) Linux still rocks hard. Try Tremulous, OpenArena, Sauerbraten, or Red Eclipse for some good FPS fragging; I suck at these games, but they're still a lot of fun. Planeshift is getting better and better for those who like MMORPG's, and there are dozens of platformers, puzzles, and 2D shoot-em-ups in most Linux repositories.

The same can be said of Photoshop: it's certainly true that GIMP doesn't have all the features of Adobe's flagship software, but who (as in, what percentage of computer users) actually need these features? Are you a professional photographer? And, if so, are you sure the functions you need don't exist in Linux? Of course the answer to this is "yes" for some, I'm just suggesting that the problem is not as widespread as the few people that encounter it would like everyone else to believe. For amateur or even semi-pro applications, GIMP works great for me - way more features than I'll ever need or want.

What can Windows do that Linux can't? Catch any of the viruses and other exploits written for Windows ;-)

jfed
September 1st, 2011, 03:14 PM
I would say gaming but there is PlayOnLinux and Wine, I mean of course, I don't think it's worth it because from my school I am allowed a certain number of copies of Win7

for you know

working...with

I don't say gaming though, because it's not exactly a turnoff, generally my answer to this question is

"everything short of running the proprietary software only available for Windows."

rbwilley
September 2nd, 2011, 06:08 AM
As far as gaming goes, I could completely stand to get rid of windows entirely and go to strictly Ubuntu, there are enough games that work with Linux to keep my occupied (though I'm not a huge gamer). The only things that keeps my dual booting is the ability to watch Netflix. I don't have cable or even network TV so all of my TV watching comes from Netflix. Give me a way to watch Netflix flawlessly on Linux and it's goodbye windows!

AllRadioisDead
September 2nd, 2011, 06:16 AM
The Windows desktop doesn't have an identity crisis.

sanderd17
September 2nd, 2011, 07:21 AM
The Windows desktop doesn't have an identity crisis.

Have you seen screenshots of Win8 yet?

jtarin
September 2nd, 2011, 07:22 AM
The Windows desktop doesn't have an identity crisis.This assumes it possess an identity.:p

krishna.988
September 2nd, 2011, 12:37 PM
Windows:

1. Run Adobe Products.
2. Run many Games.
3. Most of the Phones and other peripherals comes with Windows software are compatible.
4. Run Standard Messengers from Yahoo, MSN, Google, SKYPE (latest version) etc..
5. Lots of other softwares.

This list is not complete....


Ubuntu (Linux):

Though alternatives exist for the above its not in par...

Always have to spend time in figuring out workarounds on how to get things done in Ubuntu.

Drenriza
September 2nd, 2011, 12:46 PM
visual studio 2010 is the best vs mono_developer

Dragonbite
September 2nd, 2011, 02:28 PM
This assumes it possess an identity.:p

It has an identity, it just doesn't have personality!

irv
September 2nd, 2011, 07:29 PM
Just got an email from Barns and Noble about a ebook I bought. After downloading it I tried to run it in FBReader, no luck so I email them and this is what they wrote back:

Unfortunately, at this time, NOOK Books purchased on our website are not
compatible with FBReader on your Linux laptop. Please check our website
often as we are continuing to expand our download capabilities to other
devices. At this time, our NOOK Apps support downloads to your NOOK,
NOOK Color, iPad, PC, iPhone, Android phone,HTC HD2, MAC and Blackberry.

This is true, I can get it to work on my Android "Pandigital Nova", but not in Linux using FBReader. To be honest, it will not work with Adobe Digital Editions under Windows either.

Copper Bezel
September 2nd, 2011, 08:48 PM
God, I love not having to make an effort to boycott services that ignore my platform of choice. = P

Lozan9501
September 5th, 2011, 09:05 PM
I think gaming is the most important for a lot of people. Also a lot of professionals miss Photoshop.

Gaming is the only reason I still have a windows partition :(. I wish Unbuntu (or wine! Steam too, that would be nice) could make something that could let me run my many video games.

jff6791
September 8th, 2011, 06:19 AM
Get native resolution from my LCD monitor without benefit of a CS degree.

cye05
September 8th, 2011, 06:48 AM
nothing, Linux can do anything windows can do and better. the huge thing i love about Linux is that it doesn't suffer from ROT. I mean i been running this ubuntu 10.04 os for at least 6 months and it still runs like new. as far as gaming wine has made some progress wow works 100 percent under wine and there are quite a few other good games that work in wine as well. the only thing as of late that i have seen is net flixs does not work in Linux because of drm which requires the silver light plug-in.

nomko
September 8th, 2011, 07:42 AM
Gaming is the only reason I still have a windows partition :(. I wish Unbuntu (or wine! Steam too, that would be nice) could make something that could let me run my many video games.

You're only having Windows games? Otherwise you could use an emulator (not Wine since they "claim" that Wine is not an emulator.....).

But there are a lot of free games for Linux available. Online multiplayer games, FPS games, racing games, etc.

jtarin
September 8th, 2011, 07:54 AM
Get native resolution from my LCD monitor without benefit of a CS degree.Gee! I don't have a CS degree does that mean I don't have native resolution?:P

nomko
September 8th, 2011, 07:55 AM
nothing, Linux can do anything windows can do and better. the huge thing i love about Linux is that it doesn't suffer from ROT. I mean i been running this ubuntu 10.04 os for at least 6 months and it still runs like new. as far as gaming wine has made some progress wow works 100 percent under wine and there are quite a few other good games that work in wine as well. the only thing as of late that i have seen is net flixs does not work in Linux because of drm which requires the silver light plug-in.

The Linux equivilant of Silverligth is called Moonlight (http://www.mono-project.com/Moonlight).

For full DVD playback, check my english website.

Copper Bezel
September 8th, 2011, 08:12 AM
cye05 meant Netflix, which only supports some specific, limited platforms, not typical desktop Linux. As for the games ... seriously? The five games written for Linux seem to have been muddled together in a feeble attempt to prove that there are, in fact, games for Linux, and to have been done so by someone who'd never actually played a video game and working off rough description.

Drenriza
September 8th, 2011, 08:38 AM
Apparently run a simple ASP.NET server. To display ASP.NET pages. Since their are no decent guide what so ever, on the web.

snip3r8
September 8th, 2011, 09:56 AM
Apparently run a simple ASP.NET server. To display ASP.NET pages. Since their are no decent guide what so ever, on the web.
Have you tried the apache asp module?

dbdexter
September 8th, 2011, 10:09 AM
Windows can slow down automatically your pc until it freezes, linux can't

buzzmandt
September 8th, 2011, 01:10 PM
I quite agree on the games. I play ddo which plays nicely in natty (albeit with some 'extra' stuff needs for it to work at all) but it simply wont play anymore with ornary. Boot to windows for games. Linux for EVERYTHING else.

Dragonbite
September 8th, 2011, 02:21 PM
Apparently run a simple ASP.NET server. To display ASP.NET pages. Since their are no decent guide what so ever, on the web.

Have you looked at the Ubuntu community documentation on ModMono (https://help.ubuntu.com/community/ModMono)?

SUSE Studio also has some images of pre-configured ASP.NET web servers according to my search results (http://susegallery.com/search?q=asp.net).

If you want more control there is installing openSUSE from the DVD or following the Mono Project's ASP.NET (http://www.mono-framework.com/ASP.NET) page's instructions.

I have to admit, I have not set up an ASP.NET system on my own yet, but if I can get a machine at home cleared for alternate usage I may be setting one up.

Hralgmir
September 9th, 2011, 08:59 PM
Windows can slow down automatically your pc until it freezes, linux can't
Windows can make you spend ages watching a whirling hamster wheel until you give up and go and do something else instead of doing what you wanted to do with the computer.
Windows can also take so long to shut down you just have to go out and leave it surfing the web all by itself.
Windows can make a hot multicore system run slower than an ancient laptop with Linux.
In fairness, of course it is good for beginners with a lot of built in help and support, and no doubt very advanced users might get it to behave, but Linux is better at doing what it is told to do.

gurudev1000
September 10th, 2011, 02:01 PM
Windows can make you spend ages watching a whirling hamster wheel until you give up and go and do something else instead of doing what you wanted to do with the computer.
Windows can also take so long to shut down you just have to go out and leave it surfing the web all by itself.
Windows can make a hot multicore system run slower than an ancient laptop with Linux.
In fairness, of course it is good for beginners with a lot of built in help and support, and no doubt very advanced users might get it to behave, but Linux is better at doing what it is told to do.

Windows 7 isn't perfect... but I prefer Windows anyday (so far) over Ubuntu for multimedia. Games not being available is just an excuse. Mac users also don't have as much access to games but Mac users can stand with heads held high in a group of computer users. I wouldn't do so as an Ubuntu or Windows user.

Once in a while I get tempted (like now) to log into Ubuntu when I realise the net browsing experience is Windows is not great. Ubuntu is almost flawless in web browsing. For EVERYTHING ELSE.. Windows Seven!!!

I'm not a basic user.. neither am I a coder. Hours WASTED online trying to find a way of getting drivers that will get the best out of your video and audio hardware, with no sucess. I have a friend who loves Ubuntu.. but then, her husband is in IT who configured the whole damn laptop for her.:rolleyes::?

Raygreen
September 11th, 2011, 06:34 AM
Netflix, iTunes and a fair amount of windows programs that don't have Linux clones will not run even with Wine.

Surprisingly I was surprised how both my printers and scanner worked with Ubuntu with even less problems then getting Windows 7 to recognize them.

I finally got Ubuntu to network file share with my Windows XP computer.

It just seems that many routine things done on Windows can sometimes be really hard to implement on Ubuntu. But there are some really cool features that come standard on Ubuntu that Windows 7 doesn't offer.

Copper Bezel
September 11th, 2011, 11:02 AM
And that's what it comes down to. If it doesn't come OotB on Windows, you have to pay for it. If it doesn't come OotB on Linux, you have to work for it. = )

jtarin
September 11th, 2011, 01:07 PM
And that's what it comes down to. If it doesn't come OotB on Windows, you have to pay for it. If it doesn't come OotB on Linux, you have to work for it. = )+1 The quote of the year!:p

ashickur.noor
September 11th, 2011, 01:13 PM
A drag and drop tools like VB.net. Marketing like MS.

Dragonbite
September 11th, 2011, 01:27 PM
A drag and drop tools like VB.net. Marketing like MS.

That's pretty bad, too. Microsoft Marketing is good in some areas, and sucks in others. Apple figured it out that it isn't as much the hardware/software as the marketing (and reality-warping field) around them!

ashickur.noor
September 11th, 2011, 01:48 PM
Pre-install windows comes with a lot of PC, where linux comes with a little.