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Dragonbite
September 11th, 2011, 06:46 PM
Pre-install windows comes with a lot of PC, where linux comes with a little.

Quality over Quantity? (works for Apple)!

Raygreen
September 11th, 2011, 10:29 PM
I am impressed with Ubuntu and have used it since Ubuntu 7.04. Now running 11.04. But there are times things just don't work, and it takes days to figure out how to fix it. You can go to a Windows forum and find the answer a lot faster.

So its easier to resolve issues on Windows over Linux. It took me 2 days to figure out how to get to share files with my windows xp. Machine. But it did work eventually.

gfe
September 12th, 2011, 02:27 PM
You can go to a Windows forum and find the answer a lot faster. So its easier to resolve issues on Windows over Linux.

My experience has been the opposite. I use Linux exclusively at home (except for watching Netflix) but haven't been able to talk the rest of the family into it. Whenever I've had to solve a Linux problem, I've been able to find an answer quickly through a web search. Not so with Windows. I have had several cases (most recently with a Firefox malware extension) where all my web searches would find would be forums where the same question as mine was asked, but no answers.

My impression is that Linux users are a lot more helpful with others' problems than Windows users are.

peyre
September 12th, 2011, 06:25 PM
Pre-install windows comes with a lot of PC, where linux comes with a little.

A lot of what? You install the OS on a PC. Do you mean Windows comes with a lot of programs and features? While it's true that not all Linux distros do--some are pretty bare-bones--Ubuntu comes with plenty. Something tells me you haven't looked very closely at Ubuntu...if by PC you mean programs & features, anyway.

sanderd17
September 12th, 2011, 06:33 PM
A lot of what? You install the OS on a PC. Do you mean Windows comes with a lot of programs and features? While it's true that not all Linux distros do--some are pretty bare-bones--Ubuntu comes with plenty. Something tells me you haven't looked very closely at Ubuntu...if by PC you mean programs & features, anyway.

No, he probably means that Windows is preinstalled on a lot of PC. Or a lot of PC come with Windows.

Ubuntu has way more programs than Windows, and still less bloatware (although the bloatware on Windows mostly comes from the OEM).

Dragonbite
September 12th, 2011, 06:44 PM
No, he probably means that Windows is preinstalled on a lot of PC. Or a lot of PC come with Windows.

Ubuntu has way more programs than Windows, and still less bloatware (although the bloatware on Windows mostly comes from the OEM).

Depends on if you are including all the crap-ware usually installed on computers with Windows pre-installed!!

MG&TL
September 12th, 2011, 06:53 PM
Sorry, I don't have time to read through this entire thread, so I don't know if this has been mentioned before, BUT:

The awesome animation you get when you press <super><TAB> and it scrolls through the windows-I know compiz can do this, but it just isn't the same.

Anything else, though...;)

peyre
September 12th, 2011, 06:55 PM
No, he probably means that Windows is preinstalled on a lot of PC. Or a lot of PC come with Windows.

Ubuntu has way more programs than Windows, and still less bloatware (although the bloatware on Windows mostly comes from the OEM).

OHH! His comment makes more sense, then. If it had been better written, I wouldn't have misunderstood him.

Copper Bezel
September 12th, 2011, 08:59 PM
Sorry, I don't have time to read through this entire thread, so I don't know if this has been mentioned before, BUT:

The awesome animation you get when you press <super><TAB> and it scrolls through the windows-I know compiz can do this, but it just isn't the same.

Anything else, though...;)

No way. Ring switcher 4evs, man. = P

= )

Basher101
September 12th, 2011, 09:08 PM
The ONLY thing windows does for me what linux can't is play games on my laptop with the dx9 driver. I have very poor support on OpenGL with my onboard Intel Mobile 4 Chipseries. I will get myself a powerhouse with i7 2600k CPU, 8 gigs RAM, a GTX 580, watercooling...and see if i can get Win 7 to run in a VBOX and play games there at MAX. Still, i have yet to collect the money for all those parts.

Stolgrove
September 13th, 2011, 01:34 AM
Linux is making me think for real for the first time since I first learned dos and qbasic in 1990. Frustrating that I didn't see this wealth before, now I'm 30ish and playing catchup

wackawacka
October 7th, 2011, 05:42 AM
I just been wondering what other users have found that windows is able to do that linux (more specifically ubuntu) cant do...

so far the only thing i have found that i cant do anymore is gaming and a few online videos dont work sometimes

also, add anything to the list that makes one better or worse than the other, such as linux being practically virus free

the question should be asked the other way. linux is so stable it runs airport systems. if M$ didn't have such a huge monopoly on things like netflix's DRM, linux could do absolutely anything. but you can watch videos on linux and you can do audio production on linux, but most people are used to the popular programs on mac/M$, but the question should def be asked the other way.

x-shaney-x
October 7th, 2011, 02:06 PM
Windows can do SKY player (silverlight).
It can also flash mobile phone firmware, I am yet to find a way to do it in linux.

.hfxdesign
October 7th, 2011, 02:13 PM
Windows can convince users that $300-400 really is a reasonable price for an operating system.

j/k ^^

Currently Microsoft holds the rights to the DirectX API which seems to be the preference of many mainstream video game developers. Let's face it, wine works sometimes, but not all of the time :)

Mikeb85
October 7th, 2011, 03:19 PM
Windows can convince users that $300-400 really is a reasonable price for an operating system.

j/k ^^

Currently Microsoft holds the rights to the DirectX API which seems to be the preference of many mainstream video game developers. Let's face it, wine works sometimes, but not all of the time :)

It's not necessarily their preference, just where they see economic opportunity for the time being. Let's face it - Xbox360 has the largest console market share, and Windows the largest PC share...

clanky
October 7th, 2011, 07:09 PM
Professional quality CAD software.

I would so love to see good quality CAD software available for Linux.

barthus
October 8th, 2011, 06:48 PM
Windows can convince users that $300-400 really is a reasonable price for an operating system.

Haha, this is funny. I agree with this. :D

Mikeb85
October 11th, 2011, 01:29 AM
Professional quality CAD software.

I would so love to see good quality CAD software available for Linux.

Autodesk has already made a Linux port for Maya, maybe they can port their other software in the not too distant future?

TigerNutte
October 11th, 2011, 03:26 AM
I just been wondering what other users have found that windows is able to do that linux (more specifically ubuntu) cant do...

so far the only thing i have found that i cant do anymore is gaming and a few online videos dont work sometimes

also, add anything to the list that makes one better or worse than the other, such as linux being practically virus free

Here's another thing Windows & Mac can do that Linux can't....PLUG & PLAY!!!!!!!!!!!!
Ubuntu in it's wisdom doesn't have support installed on DVD drives & now I can't read or write Cd's, DVD's

sammiev
October 11th, 2011, 03:36 AM
Here's another thing Windows & Mac can do that Linux can't....PLUG & PLAY!!!!!!!!!!!!
Ubuntu in it's wisdom doesn't have support installed on DVD drives & now I can't read or write Cd's, DVD's

Can't read or write Cd's DVD's? Hmmmm no problems here.

stinkeye
October 11th, 2011, 03:55 AM
Make you telephone their call centre when you reinstall on a new hard drive
to prove your not a thief.

catlover2
October 11th, 2011, 09:35 AM
It can also activate flawlessly over the internet.

May the day never come when Ubuntu needs to do that...

Dragonbite
October 11th, 2011, 02:01 PM
Here's another thing Windows & Mac can do that Linux can't....PLUG & PLAY!!!!!!!!!!!!
Ubuntu in it's wisdom doesn't have support installed on DVD drives & now I can't read or write Cd's, DVD's

Odd... I find that with Linux I get ALL of the drivers (well, maybe not the wireless or the graphics all the time, but I know about those). I use Linux because it "just works" more times than Windows does, without having to activate/reactivate/prove innocence/etc.

If I buy something, then it depends on whether the peripheral manufacturer as shared the drivers or not. It's kinda like years ago when Apple had the same issue; if it wasn't made for a Mac (or said Mac compatible), it didn't work (mostly). Now Macs are almost as common as Windows while Linux is where Macs used to be.

makitso
October 12th, 2011, 06:24 PM
Reliably do suspend/resume. :(

Furcifer
October 13th, 2011, 03:43 AM
I would have said that linux can't run the Unity Player web plugin for playing N.O.V.A. Elite on Facebook, but then Gameloft shut the game down, so apparently linux is not the only entity in play with limitations.

Of course the major limitation is market demand. If Windows, or for that matter, Apple, didn't exist, then all demand and therefore all development would be focused on linux, and nobody would have any frame of reference to make such comparisons. Then again, how honestly open-source would it remain? Would Steve Jobs have been as committed?

There are so many dynamic forces that brought us to this point in reality, but the frustration people have is just as real. It seems though, that there are so many little simple things that would apparently require throwing the baby out with the bathwater in terms of coding for a smidge-better responsiveness, reliability and ease of use.

Just as virtual machines are better for some applications than dual-booting and vice-versa, so are operating systems. I suspect that will always be the case but back to those simple things again: I recall going through every Red Hat release from 6.0 until they sold out before I got native support for AMD/VIA sound and a mouse wheel within the same distro! Why did it take all the way to Red Hat 9.0 before something so obvious as drivers for the second-most popular sound chip architecture in the industry actually worked? Did nobody notice? Did it actually take that long to fix? Or was there just a bureaucratic disconnect between the people complaining and the people setting the priorities for what to fix first? I'm thinking third guess, and where that exists at all will practically ensure that the small simple oolies will be routinely overlooked and tolerated in favor of bigger initiatives.

peyre
October 13th, 2011, 04:34 AM
Here's another thing Windows & Mac can do that Linux can't....PLUG & PLAY!!!!!!!!!!!!
Ubuntu in it's wisdom doesn't have support installed on DVD drives & now I can't read or write Cd's, DVD's

Well no, true "plug and play" is a Windows thing. But Ubuntu will detect and install the latest drivers for most hardware automatically. And it does so with a much wider selection of hardware than XP or Vista. The trouble is that when you have something that the manufacturer hasn't provided Linux drivers for, or specifications so the Linux community can write some, you'll find installation difficult at best. That's hardly Linux's fault though--even though it is an issue that Linux users have to deal with.

Xubuntu installed my DVDRW drive automatically. I installed K3B and Nero Linux and I'm able to burn CDs and DVDs just fine (the one limitation in Linux is I can't modify and add to a CD-R that's already been written to).

If you're unable to play professionally-made video DVDs, it's because they contain encryption which Ubuntu can't ship with support for, due to legal reasons. To enable it, you need to install Medibuntu: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Medibuntu

Pferra
October 16th, 2011, 10:42 PM
The most remarkable thing I cannot do with Ubuntu is to sit my 11 years old boy in front of the PC as if it were an electronic pacifier for grown up kids playing GTA or games like it.

Thank you, Ubuntu!!!!

Being serious, I haven't found so far a good tool that allows me to manage my WHOLE collection of music, both computer files AND physical audio CDs.

Although I found an excelent alternative in gMusicBrowser, havent found yet a Linux tool to replace the sophisticated and powerful MediaMonkey, wich kept me stuck to Windows for a long time.

But I repeat myself: gMusicBrowser (http://gmusicbrowser.org/) is a great tool which allowed me to cross the line into Ubuntu, becaming this way my all purpose OS.

Best regards,

Pablo

jtarin
October 17th, 2011, 01:16 AM
The most remarkable thing I cannot do with Ubuntu is to sit my 11 years old boy in front of the PC as if it were an electronic pacifier for grown up kids playing GTA or games like it.

Thank you, Ubuntu!!!!

Being serious, I haven't found so far a good tool that allows me to manage my WHOLE collection of music, both computer files AND physical audio CDs.

Although I found an excelent alternative in gMusicBrowser, havent found yet a Linux tool to replace the sophisticated and powerful MediaMonkey, wich kept me stuck to Windows for a long time.

But I repeat myself: gMusicBrowser (http://gmusicbrowser.org/) is a great tool which allowed me to cross the line into Ubuntu, becaming this way my all purpose OS.

Best regards,

Pablo
Installing MediaMonkey

MediaMonkey runs on Windows platforms only. It is supported on all 32/64 bit versions of Windows 7, Windows Vista, and Windows XP, but is also known to work on Windows 98, Windows ME, Windows 2000, and WINE (Linux).

Hated On Mostly
October 17th, 2011, 04:36 AM
Windows has excellent PDF, OCR, and scanning tools like Adobe Acrobat Pro, Finereader, and Omnipage.

jtarin
October 17th, 2011, 08:45 AM
Windows has excellent PDF, OCR, and scanning tools like Adobe Acrobat Pro, Finereader, and Omnipage.It's a no-brainer to get Acrobat 9 Pro working in Ubuntu....as for OCR....take your pick (https://help.ubuntu.com/community/OCR).While setting up anything in Linux can be daunting for some it's not impossible to have good, free and usable software.

Pferra
October 17th, 2011, 11:05 PM
Thank you, JTarin, I know you can run MM with Wine, but I think that's a kind of "patch" and I would like to have a "native" solution under Linux up to MM level.

I would like to insist that gMusicBrowser is *almost* there and is more than a simple "better than nothing" option. The only missing feature, up to my needs, is the managing of "virtual CDs" as MM does.

But that is a feature request to post to some GMB specific thread, isn't it?

Best regards,

Pablo

jtarin
October 18th, 2011, 03:30 AM
Thank you, JTarin, I know you can run MM with Wine, but I think that's a kind of "patch" and I would like to have a "native" solution under Linux up to MM level.

I would like to insist that gMusicBrowser is *almost* there and is more than a simple "better than nothing" option. The only missing feature, up to my needs, is the managing of "virtual CDs" as MM does.

But that is a feature request to post to some GMB specific thread, isn't it?

Best regards,

PabloGlad to see your optimism about Linux applications. So many give up and go back to Windows for some very trivial things that can be overcome with a voice and perseverance.:P

peyre
October 18th, 2011, 03:57 AM
It's a no-brainer to get Acrobat 9 Pro working in Ubuntu....as for OCR....take your pick (https://help.ubuntu.com/community/OCR).While setting up anything in Linux can be daunting for some it's not impossible to have good, free and usable software.

And don't forget XSane for scanning.

geoaraujo
October 18th, 2011, 01:13 PM
And don't forget XSane for scanning.Or Skanlite: http://userbase.kde.org/Skanlite

Copper Bezel
October 18th, 2011, 01:37 PM
Well, those tools don't take a paper document in the scanner feed tray and turn it directly into a searchable pdf, which is generally the sort of thing you want out of a document scanner.

firefox834
October 18th, 2011, 02:19 PM
What can Windows do that Linux can't?

I can play FM2011 with ease on Windows
I can run my CCTV set up
I can manage the conversion and burning of DVD's (which actually play on a DVD lol) something I have never achieved on Linux

Overall Linux is way way too pernickety to do normal things on but I do use it for browsing and thats about it

chili555
October 18th, 2011, 02:32 PM
I can manage the conversion and burning of DVD's (which actually play on a DVD lol) something I have never achieved on LinuxI have very good luck with the package devede which is in the repositories.

irv
October 18th, 2011, 02:38 PM
I have very good luck with the package devede which is in the repositories.

Yes DeVeDe is a great package. I used it to make instruction videos with a menu to select the videos. It did the converting and Burning all in one session.

kurt18947
October 18th, 2011, 04:22 PM
I just had a little experience that shows why it's useful to have a small hardly-ever-used Windows partition. There was a firmware update available for my printer. Guess what was required to install the update? Yup, Windows. Same with my GPS. There's a program to write POIs and such to an SD card then plug the SD card in. Guess what? it only works in Windows. I just don't find it worthwhile to try to "fight city hall" when the instances are rare. Start Windows, do what's necessary, close it and "put it back on the shelf".

irv
October 19th, 2011, 12:48 AM
I just had a little experience that shows why it's useful to have a small hardly-ever-used Windows partition. There was a firmware update available for my printer. Guess what was required to install the update? Yup, Windows. Same with my GPS. There's a program to write POIs and such to an SD card then plug the SD card in. Guess what? it only works in Windows. I just don't find it worthwhile to try to "fight city hall" when the instances are rare. Start Windows, do what's necessary, close it and "put it back on the shelf".

Yes, I agree. I paid for Windows and I keep a small partition on my hard drive just for those times when you need to do something like this. Maybe one every few months something come along that I need Windows. When I am done I go right back to Linux. Maybe some day I can do away with it, but until that day I will keep it around.

Hated On Mostly
October 19th, 2011, 06:35 AM
It's a no-brainer to get Acrobat 9 Pro working in Ubuntu....as for OCR....take your pick (https://help.ubuntu.com/community/OCR).While setting up anything in Linux can be daunting for some it's not impossible to have good, free and usable software.

I am familiar with all of the Linux scanning options and none of them compare to the quality of Adobe Pro, Readiris, or Omnipage. Linux can do scanning and OCR but not at the same quality that Windows can.

Also, Adobe Acrobat Pro is not available for Linux. Adobe Reader is available which is not the same thing and does not offer scanning or OCR.

dancingLoki
October 19th, 2011, 11:47 AM
Is there any way to play netflix video? This is pretty big for me.

satanselbow
October 19th, 2011, 12:12 PM
Well, those tools don't take a paper document in the scanner feed tray and turn it directly into a searchable pdf, which is generally the sort of thing you want out of a document scanner.

gscan2pdf does exactly that - and does it very well :D

@Whoever said there were ocr quality issues:
Can't say I find any difference in the quality of OCR between windows and linux - the tesseract engine is common on both platforms.

@Hated On:
You are correct there is no native linux version - Acrobat 9 Pro is trivial to configure in wine ;)

Lucradia
October 19th, 2011, 12:15 PM
...Windows has spyware built right into the operating system, by microsoft. (Windows Genuine Advantage) This wasn't the case before Windows 2000. Since the CD was [somewhat] bound to the CD-KEY you received.

moldaviax
October 19th, 2011, 12:43 PM
apparently a netflix linux client is in the works....

The main issues limiting linux aren't really technical linux issues but external challenges such as

1) Application developers only targetting windows platforms (games, some business software)
2) Patents, DRM etc making linux solutions less elegant and/or illegal in some regions eg playing blu ray

M.

chili555
October 19th, 2011, 12:44 PM
Is there any way to play netflix video? This is pretty big for me.Please see: http://liliputing.com/2011/08/netflix-video-streaming-for-linux-on-the-way.html

Or you could take the simple approach and buy a Linux-based device to stream to your television such as Roku.

owiknowi
October 19th, 2011, 12:47 PM
esri software (arcview / arcgis) would be nice on linux. but, hey, think about the $$$

michaell4
October 19th, 2011, 01:26 PM
The only downside(s) I've come across when using Ubuntu is the lack of support for the latest games and software such as Photoshop not being compatible with Ubuntu.

Those are the only reasons I still have a Windows partition.
If Adobe supported Ubuntu as well as game developers then i'd drop windows immediately.

irv
October 19th, 2011, 02:49 PM
I know the question What can Windows do that Linux can't? And that this tread has been around for some time, and may never die, because of the market share MS has. There will always be something we need windows for, so I don't make it a big deal over that fact.
I am always trying different OS' so I keep two Hard Drive around to switch out. One thing I do is keep a copy of Windows on each so I can dual boot. But to be honest, I may go into Windows once every 3 to 6 months. And sometimes it is only to do update so I don't get to far behind.
I remember one time not using one of the Hard Drives for about a year and when I booted into Windows I didn't think I was ever going to get done with update. (Needed to reboot 3 or 4 times).
The point being I know I will need it, and I paid for it so why not keep it around just in case. Like I said not a big deal.

Copper Bezel
October 19th, 2011, 06:33 PM
gscan2pdf does exactly that - and does it very well :)

I stand corrected, then. = ) The only ones I've seen in the past were primitive things, where you could scan a document into a series of images if you were lucky, then comb the images for the text, but there was no way to embed the text information in the scanned document itself.

Hated On Mostly
October 23rd, 2011, 12:49 PM
Secure wipe a drive using a GUI.

dannyvanleur
October 23rd, 2011, 01:03 PM
Blu-ray playback

jtarin
October 23rd, 2011, 02:30 PM
Secure wipe a drive using a GUI.
Name the application.

jtarin
October 23rd, 2011, 02:32 PM
Blu-ray playbackVLC plays them and its cross-platform.

Lucradia
October 23rd, 2011, 07:47 PM
Secure wipe a drive using a GUI.

One word: DBAN, because I don't know a GUI app on Windows that can secure wipe a drive for free.

Also, DBAN technically is a linux distribution.

Hated On Mostly
October 24th, 2011, 12:38 AM
Name the application.

CCleaner

http://www.piriform.com/ccleaner


One word: DBAN, because I don't know a GUI app on Windows that can secure wipe a drive for free.

Also, DBAN technically is a linux distribution.

CCleaner

http://www.piriform.com/ccleaner

There are actually a few other free ones that secure wipe a drive with a GUI from within Windows.

On Linux you have to load a live CD (Parted Magic or DBAN) in order to use a GUI app to secure wipe a secondary drive. You can't just install DBAN into Ubuntu through the repositories and use it.

Hated On Mostly
October 24th, 2011, 01:11 AM
gscan2pdf does exactly that - and does it very well :D

@Whoever said there were ocr quality issues:
Can't say I find any difference in the quality of OCR between windows and linux - the tesseract engine is common on both platforms.

The Windows programs have a lot of features such as deskew that auto-correct poor scans. On Linux you generally have to go use a separate program or try to configure a buggy plugin to correct scans.

On the Windows programs character recognition is excellent, especially on poor documents, poor scans, and foreign languages. File size is greatly reduced while maintaining high visual quality.


@Hated On:
You are correct there is no native linux version - Acrobat 9 Pro is trivial to configure in wine ;)

Windows vs Linux is a moot point for me as if I ever switch back to Linux I would use VMWARE for virtualization. Virtualization works well on even low-powered systems these days. If you have 2GB of RAM, you can use just about any program seamlessly and comfortably from any operating system you want. Without virtualization however I would have to stick with Windows. Windows is great for getting work done and more importantly getting it done easily.

x-shaney-x
October 24th, 2011, 04:35 PM
HDMI output to external TV with sound.

At least not reliably or without extra faffing about.

beew
October 24th, 2011, 05:22 PM
Forcing PC manufactures to lock down their machines so it can run Windows only. Not to mention laying traps to spy on you and prevent you from running things on your machine.

Lucradia
October 24th, 2011, 05:31 PM
On Linux you have to load a live CD (Parted Magic or DBAN) in order to use a GUI app to secure wipe a secondary drive. You can't just install DBAN into Ubuntu through the repositories and use it.

That's logical because when wiping a drive, you shouldn't wipe it while using the/any drive. I don't need to secure wipe USB Drives, because no one I know in real life actually tracks me save for my troll parents.

beew
October 24th, 2011, 05:44 PM
CCleaner

http://www.piriform.com/ccleaner



CCleaner

http://www.piriform.com/ccleaner

There are actually a few other free ones that secure wipe a drive with a GUI from within Windows.

On Linux you have to load a live CD (Parted Magic or DBAN) in order to use a GUI app to secure wipe a secondary drive. You can't just install DBAN into Ubuntu through the repositories and use it.

What are you talking about? The CCleaner only removes unwanted junks and supposedly clean the registry(this function is not that good, at least when I still used WIndows ~1 year ago), it doesn't wipe your hard drive. A Linux equivalent would be bleachbit.

Finn bjerke
October 24th, 2011, 10:01 PM
Cubase is Windows / Mac
TAbledit is Windows / Mac

COMPUTERVIRUS is well Windows / Mac

jtarin
October 24th, 2011, 11:04 PM
What are you talking about? The CCleaner only removes unwanted junks and supposedly clean the registry(this function is not that good, at least when I still used WIndows ~1 year ago), it doesn't wipe your hard drive. A Linux equivalent would be bleachbit.Amen!+1

ubupirate
October 24th, 2011, 11:09 PM
What are you talking about? The CCleaner only removes unwanted junks and supposedly clean the registry(this function is not that good, at least when I still used WIndows ~1 year ago), it doesn't wipe your hard drive. A Linux equivalent would be bleachbit.

What are you talking about? CCleaner does wipe free space / entire drives.

beew
October 24th, 2011, 11:17 PM
What are you talking about? CCleaner does wipe free space / entire drives.

Here is the list of features

Where does it say it will wipe your hard drive?

http://www.piriform.com/ccleaner/features

sammiev
October 24th, 2011, 11:44 PM
Here is the list of features

Where does it say it will wipe your hard drive?

http://www.piriform.com/ccleaner/features

I see it does use the word "Windows"

ubupirate
October 25th, 2011, 12:00 AM
Here is the list of features

Where does it say it will wipe your hard drive?

http://www.piriform.com/ccleaner/features

Right here:

http://i52.tinypic.com/10xwyog.png

beew
October 25th, 2011, 12:06 AM
Ok, that is new. It didn't have it when I used Windows. But bleachbit also has that feature


Overwrite free disk space to hide previously files

http://bleachbit.sourceforge.net/features

In the gui it is simply called free space.

ubupirate
October 25th, 2011, 12:09 AM
Ok, that is new. It didn't have it when I used Windows. But bleachbit also has that feature



http://bleachbit.sourceforge.net/features

In the gui it is simply called free space.

I know. I use Bleachbit on Windows, and also used it on Ubuntu too. It's really ace software, definitely recommend to anyone. :)

Bunny Boy
October 25th, 2011, 03:19 AM
The only thing I use Windows for is to access iTunes.

Hated On Mostly
October 28th, 2011, 11:59 AM
Windows supports Intel Quick Sync, Linux does not.

Hated On Mostly
October 28th, 2011, 12:23 PM
because no one I know in real life actually tracks me save for my troll parents.

You break your poor mother's heart...

akoskm
October 28th, 2011, 12:31 PM
Optimus Technology, saving battery power/life.
http://www.nvidia.com/object/optimus_technology.html

(First time that windows becomes cheaper to me than Linux, after so many years... I can get Windows 7 for free through academic licence => optimus support => + battery life)

AgentZ86
November 2nd, 2011, 01:30 PM
Windows can keep thinking and scanning my hard drive continuously for no apparent reason while linux cannot. It would seem linux just loads up and the hard drive light goes out and it's done

I don't think linux will ever be able to do this and continuously keep my hard drive light on.

Not that this is a good thing I prefer the system to load and be done with it

I noticed linux hard drive light never comes on unless I click on something or actually do something on the computer.

asus701user
November 2nd, 2011, 02:15 PM
Windows can 'see' and connect to an Ubuntu machine. Two Ubuntu machines on the same network cannot see each other.

Generally Ubuntu is poor at networking. E.g. autofs - a nightmare.

irv
November 2nd, 2011, 02:49 PM
Windows can 'see' and connect to an Ubuntu machine. Two Ubuntu machines on the same network cannot see each other.

Generally Ubuntu is poor at networking. E.g. autofs - a nightmare.

I think you are wrong on this one. Any Linux OS is better at networking then Windows. Here is a screen shot of my laptop looking at my server on my network. No problem seeing other ubuntu machines from one another. This includes running Remote Desktop or Samba. Maybe you can't see them because you do not have them setup right, and remember Linux has much better security then Windows.
206131

sammiev
November 2nd, 2011, 09:00 PM
Windows can 'see' and connect to an Ubuntu machine. Two Ubuntu machines on the same network cannot see each other.

Generally Ubuntu is poor at networking. E.g. autofs - a nightmare.

I run remote laptops all the time to update software from one to another with no problems. All 3 laptops running Ubuntu. :)

KatDawg
November 3rd, 2011, 07:54 AM
Windows can use a memory card for extra memory if needed.

I'm new here and relatively new to Ubuntu.

Can you configure Ubuntu to use a memory card as a swap partition?
I was going to try it myself but gparted just doesn't seem to be loading the parts.

Thanks in advance.

viperdvman
November 3rd, 2011, 09:22 AM
I can stream movies (and music too) from my Windows desktop to my XBox 360, no problem (requires doing a sharing setup in Windows Media Player). Not sure if I can do the same thing with an Ubuntu computer. It's one of the reasons I still keep Windows around on my desktop.

Tri-Booter
November 4th, 2011, 03:59 AM
Windows can suck it now.. For some reason I always had issues with Wine and previous releases until 11.10.. I just finished playing MW2 on the highest level and it ran better than it ever did on 7 Ultimate 64... So I'm good..

mamamia88
November 4th, 2011, 04:30 AM
Publisher had to boot windows just to create a pamphlet for a class today. That and gaming

pavi_elex
November 4th, 2011, 07:59 AM
Annoy...

krishna.988
November 4th, 2011, 10:41 AM
Windows:

1. Run Adobe Products.
2. Run many Games.
3. Most of the Phones and other peripherals comes with Windows software are compatible.
4. Run Standard Messengers from Yahoo, MSN, Google, SKYPE (latest version) etc..
5. Lots of other softwares.

This list is not complete....


Ubuntu (Linux):

Though alternatives exist for the above its not in par...

Always have to spend time in figuring out workarounds on how to get things done in Ubuntu.

Dragonbite
November 4th, 2011, 03:01 PM
Publisher had to boot windows just to create a pamphlet for a class today. That and gaming

Yeah, Publisher is one of the annoying products that pushes my wife into needing Windows.

Finn bjerke
November 4th, 2011, 04:53 PM
Windows can:

cost you money Ubuntu can not
Get PC virus Ubuntu can not

Dragonbite
November 4th, 2011, 05:16 PM
Windows can:

cost you money Ubuntu can not
Get PC virus Ubuntu can not

If you need corporate support, Ubuntu can cost you money!

asus701user
November 4th, 2011, 05:37 PM
Then I haven't set Samba up correctly. I didn't need to set up Win to see the Ubuntu machine. Is there a beginners guide/GUI or anything to set up samba? I have posted my problem on the networking forum but it is not yet solved. The folders are already set up to be 'shared'.

irv
November 5th, 2011, 04:06 AM
Then I haven't set Samba up correctly. I didn't need to set up Win to see the Ubuntu machine. Is there a beginners guide/GUI or anything to set up samba? I have posted my problem on the networking forum but it is not yet solved. The folders are already set up to be 'shared'.
If you google it you will come up with sites like this:
http://www.unixmen.com/linux-tutorials/linux-distributions/linux-distributions4-ubuntu/1203-how-to-install-and-configure-samba-in-ubuntu-1010-maverick-meerkat-via-gui-

asus701user
November 5th, 2011, 03:44 PM
Connecting two Ubuntu machines

I have installed (reinstalled) samba samba-common and system-config-samba on both machines (one is 10.10 and the other 11.10).

Samba runs on the former but not on 11.10 - it asks for password,accepts it and then nothing; no error or any message. Is this a problem with 11.10 - how can I can I get Samba GUI to run or find the problem? 11.10 is a new install and not amended.

Windows sees the shared folder straightaway with no changes or settings. Ubuntu cannot.

I have several shared folders on both machine but in File Manager - Browse Network it just shows Windows Network (?) and then Failed to retrieve share list form server. How can I get this to work. do I have to 'mount' the folders one by one or do they just appear and where.

I want to use Ubuntu but with simple networking Windows is winning easily.

I do hope someone can show how Ubuntu can do this out of the box.

(I have also posted this problem in the Networking forum but no-one there can tell/show me how either.)

TeamRocket1233c
November 5th, 2011, 06:10 PM
Actually, not much. Also, Windows can be a virus and malware magnet, unless you have really good anti-virus and anti-malware software, whereas Linux don't even need any anti-virus or anti-malware software.

TeamRocket1233c
November 5th, 2011, 06:16 PM
Windows:

1. Run Adobe Products.
2. Run many Games.
3. Most of the Phones and other peripherals comes with Windows software are compatible.
4. Run Standard Messengers from Yahoo, MSN, Google, SKYPE (latest version) etc..
5. Lots of other softwares.

This list is not complete....


Ubuntu (Linux):

Though alternatives exist for the above its not in par...

Always have to spend time in figuring out workarounds on how to get things done in Ubuntu.

True. GIMP, MyPaint, and Pinta are supposed to be as good as Illiustrator and Photoshop. Also, if you need to run any Windows games in Linux, that's where WINE comes into play. DOS games: DOSBox.

RadhikaM
November 7th, 2011, 09:17 AM
My experience has been the opposite. I use Linux exclusively at home (except for watching Netflix) but haven't been able to talk the rest of the family into it. Whenever I've had to solve a Linux problem, I've been able to find an answer quickly through a web search. Not so with Windows. I have had several cases (most recently with a Firefox malware extension) where all my web searches would find would be forums where the same question as mine was asked, but no answers.

My impression is that Linux users are a lot more helpful with others' problems than Windows users are.

I agree with this statement. The response I've gotten from the Linux community on the forum and off has been much easier - as if I have any problems with Ubuntu.


The only thing I use Windows for is to access iTunes.

Though, I must agree with this sentence. This requires - at all times - at least one computer to be a Windows or a Mac.

Allow me to tell you something Windows can do that Linux is not able to - get me addicted to gaming and away from doing schoolwork. One of the major reasons I completely switched to Linux was the more access to puzzle games (My brain's still working, eh?) and the productivity for school and my writing.

Also, I LOVE how the software is so easily found, and not searched for throughout the internet.

BrettWilkin
November 7th, 2011, 03:45 PM
I have been teaching and using Macs for 2 years at work, My computer of choice for the last 10 or more years has been windows and I have had a KDE desktop for 3 years. More and more I gravitate to my kde and have spent hours playing with Gimp Cinelerra and Blender. I also added Kmess recently and skype. The big thing I notice is that I can do almost everything On my kde that I can do with with the others. the big thing I have noticed is that my KDE is getting better all the time and surprising me with what it can do while the Macs and Win are surprising me with how much their development appears to be slowing. I am starting to recomend to my students to give Linux systems a go. I have found that open office has some functions that Numbers and Keynote are lacking. I also find Cinelerra better than iMovie with the exception that it stops often but it also recovers very quickly and easy and I have even found the Macs getting slow and needing standard maintenance procedures and iMovie occasionaly crashing. I monitor and maintain 60 student owned Macs and about 97 student owned windows computers. Linux is gradually getting very high in my estimations and regards.

stanbx
April 2nd, 2012, 02:13 AM
Someone has probably already said this... But my one missing feature is begin able to stream Netflix. This is solved with VMware Player to make a virtual windows machine. I understand why this is and I'm not complaining, just thought I'd add my two cents.

peyre
April 2nd, 2012, 05:04 AM
:guitar:
Someone has probably already said this... But my one missing feature is begin able to stream Netflix. This is solved with VMware Player to make a virtual windows machine. I understand why this is and I'm not complaining, just thought I'd add my two cents.

Yes, and maybe in a few years we'll be able to use ReactOS in our VMs instead of Windows itself, and go Microsoft-free altogether!

BertN45
April 2nd, 2012, 05:10 AM
Windows is printing money, Linux doesn't.

peyre
April 2nd, 2012, 06:21 AM
Windows is printing money, Linux doesn't.

Your objection to Linux is its inability to counterfeit money? We should advertise that to the government! ;)

SAKeeler
April 2nd, 2012, 07:14 AM
Windows can do many things that Linux can't do, as well is the oposite.
I have gone back and forth over the past few years using several different *nix variants, then back to Windows for one reason or another. Most often due to gaming. I really enjoy PC gaming much more than on Xbox, though for the time being I will stick with the Xbox as I have once again gone fully Linux on my machine (Ubuntu 11.10 in this case, though I had a brief stint with CrunchBang). This time though I am adamant to stick with Ubuntu as my OS, and here is my reasons for doing so:

I much prefer the way software is handled with Linux as opposed to Windows. Sure you have Microsoft Update, which is pretty good all things considered. But as it is you have far to many individual Applications installing odds and ends all over your system eating up space and resources which just gets tedious to deal with after a while.

On the Linux side managing software is far simpler to me. Consolidated package management is wonderful. It just is, I really can't say much more about it. Is it perfect, certainly not, but it's damn good.

Next we have the Appearance and Configuration. Is there a reason Microsoft and Apple (to a far lesser extent than even Microsoft) only let you customize so much of the OS, sure there is. And those reasons differ for each, Apple is, well Apple, and prize there own particular astetic. Microsoft's primary concern is with busnisses, and make no mistake about that, so a consistant look and feel as it were, is important. You can certainly do somewhat more than each would like you to, but it's not easy, or stable in most cases to do so.

Linux can be respun in so many different ways it's hard to keep track of it. Say what you will about Unity, Gnome 3, Openbox, awesome, or any other of the countless number of Window Managers and Desktops out there, you still have a choice as to what to use, and how you want it to look and feel.

The real meat of the issue, so to speak, is Productivity though. I grew up with Windows, from DOS and Windows 3.1 through Windows 7, did I get things done? Sure, school reports, marathon sessions of L.O.R.D on a friends BBS,(though I'm hard pressed to argue this is productive in any way, still), and many other examples.

But the one things I did more than any other was troubleshoot. Maintaining a Windows machine is a constant battle, Anti-Virus conflicting with drivers, Game installs, the OS itself on a few occasions.

My gaming habit is still alive and well however, and when it comes down to it, I will still need a Windows machine for that. And I am sourcing parts for a HTPC build for the task.

My have I rambled, I do hope some of it made sense to someone:p

Each OS has it's own drawbacks, and it's high marks. What task you need to achieve will determine which one works for you in that situation. Sometimes if you do some digging what you thought could only be a Windows solution can be done with Linux, with some work, but you know, I really like doing that work so for me it's OK. Others haven't got the time or inclination, or both, to do so. And using Windows works better for them.

I fear I haven't really stuck with the thread but there you have it.
Discuss!):P

Bucky Ball
April 2nd, 2012, 07:23 AM
Pro-tools, Cubase, Sibelius and many other pro-level AV softwares ...

rima
April 2nd, 2012, 11:16 AM
I never understood the Windows vs Linux anyway. I love both of them! :D Both of them do amazing things. (But I must say I was utterly disgusted with Windows Vista....Especially that my parents now silently took complete reign over it from the last 2 years, the computer is now in the state of trash (they won't even let me fix it! O.O)

However, business strategies are a completely different topic and a completely different story...

But I did almost have a heart attack when my friend who had to use my computer (running Ubuntu on it at the time) looked at the GUI and stated: "What a strange Windows you have there."

Please don't tell me I'm the only person....:D

Well to not completely offtop for me Windows does writing school projects and running Adobe products. If only Adobe made Photoshop, Shockwave, Dreamweaver etc. for Linux THOUSANDS of people would be running to Linux completely

zombifier25
April 2nd, 2012, 11:43 AM
But I did almost have a heart attack when my friend who had to use my computer (running Ubuntu on it at the time) looked at the GUI and stated: "What a strange Windows you have there."

Please don't tell me I'm the only person....:D

For most average dudes, Computers = Windows. It's pretty much burnt on their mind since they are taught computers with Windows, they don't know, and don't need to know that Windows is just an OS and not the computer itself.
So no, you are not the only one :P
(some IT schools at my place still make that mistake - they advertise that they 'teach Turbo Pascal', not knowing the fact that Turbo Pascal is merely a compiler and NOT the programming language itself)

johnno56
April 2nd, 2012, 11:56 AM
Create and play golf courses like MS Links using Arnold Palmer Course Designer. (Tried Wine. APCD ran ok but could not get Links to run)

Dragonbite
April 2nd, 2012, 02:58 PM
Windows is printing money, Linux doesn't.

Red Hat's working on that.. they've reached the $1B mark last week!

BertN45
April 2nd, 2012, 09:50 PM
Red Hat's working on that.. they've reached the $1B mark last week!
Congratulation, but I think that is the money Bill spends on charity each year. Sorry :D

I know another major thing Windows does better, it almost never corrupts my files after power failures, ext4 has file corruption as a feature. I just found out, I go back to ext3.

irv
April 3rd, 2012, 03:28 PM
Congratulation, but I think that is the money Bill spends on charity each year. Sorry :D

I know another major thing Windows does better, it almost never corrupts my files after power failures, ext4 has file corruption as a feature. I just found out, I go back to ext3.

I have been using ext4 since it's release and I have never had this problem, and I have had power outages. Besides this I have been beta testing 12.04 64bit with ext4 since Dec of last year and I never had one time where I had to reinstall it because of any major problem. so far this has been the best release of Ubuntu yet.

Hirobian
April 3rd, 2012, 03:55 PM
Photoshop? Nah theres gimp.

I have to say GIMP doesn't have the same feel to it, I use Adobe Photoshop CS2 (Yes, I know its old but it works like a charm :P ) and I appreciate how it works. I prefer Adobe Photoshop because its meant to be a photo editor but can be used for art, GIMP, I believe, is more of an art program that is edit capable...anyways it just feels very different despite having a fairly familiar UI compared to Photoshop. In my opinion anyways.

I have made an effort to get used to GIMP but I still prefer Adobe Photoshop.

peyre
April 3rd, 2012, 04:25 PM
I have been using ext4 since it's release and I have never had this problem, and I have had power outages. Besides this I have been beta testing 12.04 64bit with ext4 since Dec of last year and I never had one time where I had to reinstall it because of any major problem. so far this has been the best release of Ubuntu yet.

I've noticed that when I pull out a flash drive before the OS has decided it's completely done with it and I get the message saying that some data has been lost: in Windows it's not serious and usually no data has actually been lost--but in Linux it means you've just hosed some data.

peyre
April 3rd, 2012, 04:29 PM
I have to say GIMP doesn't have the same feel to it, I use Adobe Photoshop CS2 (Yes, I know its old but it works like a charm :P ) and I appreciate how it works. I prefer Adobe Photoshop because its meant to be a photo editor but can be used for art, GIMP, I believe, is more of an art program that is edit capable...anyways it just feels very different despite having a fairly familiar UI compared to Photoshop. In my opinion anyways.

I have made an effort to get used to GIMP but I still prefer Adobe Photoshop.

Very true. The GIMP is a great application (though it needs a new name), but still it isn't Photoshop. There are things Photoshop can do that GIMP can't, but then we're talking about very expensive proprietary software vs. something you can download completely for free. I use the GIMP myself--works well for me--but my wife uses Photoshop Elements because the GIMP just doesn't do what she needs for her scrapbooking.

irv
April 3rd, 2012, 11:39 PM
I've noticed that when I pull out a flash drive before the OS has decided it's completely done with it and I get the message saying that some data has been lost: in Windows it's not serious and usually no data has actually been lost--but in Linux it means you've just hosed some data.

I have never taken note of this because I right click on the device and do a safe remove before pulling the USB. I even done this in Windows. Just a good habit to get into.

Hirobian
April 4th, 2012, 02:44 AM
I have never taken note of this because I right click on the device and do a safe remove before pulling the USB. I even done this in Windows. Just a good habit to get into.

True that. Its the appropriate way to disconnect your flash drive from a working computer and I think it should be a protocol every computer user learns as a simple habit. Just like how we pick up the habit to make sure your trackball mouse doesn't have dust in its trackball socket. (Yep :p I have a trackball mouse)

irv
April 4th, 2012, 09:15 PM
True that. Its the appropriate way to disconnect your flash drive from a working computer and I think it should be a protocol every computer user learns as a simple habit. Just like how we pick up the habit to make sure your trackball mouse doesn't have dust in its trackball socket. (Yep :p I have a trackball mouse)

I remember the days when my mouse had a little rubber ball that got dirty all the time and the fuzz go on the little wheels and I had to clean it them also. Now my mouse has the little red light no moving part. What a great improvement.

rmil
April 4th, 2012, 11:52 PM
Windows is single task OS.

dpny
April 5th, 2012, 12:52 AM
Windows is single task OS.

That's not even remotely true.

Dragonbite
April 5th, 2012, 02:08 PM
I remember the days when my mouse had a little rubber ball that got dirty all the time and the fuzz go on the little wheels and I had to clean it them also. Now my mouse has the little red light no moving part. What a great improvement.

How about having to touch something metal in the back to make sure you are grounded before flipping the switch (in the back) to turn the computer on and off!?

Hornitodog
April 10th, 2012, 09:25 PM
There are two things for me that Windows can do well, and Linux can't:

1. Windows can run my TV tuner without problem. While the TVTime program I have installed in 12.04 works the tuner itself well, I have yet, despite months of trying, been able to get stable sound from any flavour of Linux. I have spent dozens and dozens of hours trying, and failing, to find a solution. With Windows (both XP & 7), it was as simple as 1,2,3.. it just works. The TV tuner sound problem has been terribly frustrating for me, and it keeps driving me back to Windows, as the only TV access in the house, is via my computer, so I can't do without it until a solution is found.

2. As a photographer, I use Adobe's Lightroom, Adobe Photoshop, and a Canon Pixma Pro 9000-MKII printer, none of which work with Linux. WINE does not work with the Adobe programs well.

That said, I love my Linux, and have been using it for years, unfortunately (because of the above) in a dual, and sometimes triple boot, configuration. I love being able to make my operating system look and run how *I* like (again, with exceptions noted above). I'm running 12.04 now, and have several docks, and much customisation. I love it.

If someone could tell me how to finally get stable sound out of TVTime, I would gladly make a $25 donation to their favourite charity! A solution to that problem would allow me to use Linux 90% of the time.

avacado
April 11th, 2012, 02:24 PM
A lot of professionals use GIMP for photo editting - I prefer it. Takes a little while to learn the differences. The drivers for new printer hardware can take some time to appear - your printer may just suddenly start working in linux if you keep it long enough.

Hornitodog
April 11th, 2012, 04:26 PM
A lot of professionals use GIMP for photo editting - I prefer it. Takes a little while to learn the differences. The drivers for new printer hardware can take some time to appear - your printer may just suddenly start working in linux if you keep it long enough.
Yes, I've used GIMP for quite some time, and its newest iteration is greatly improved. Still, to me, there's nothing like Lighroom. But, as I previously pointed out, you pay for what Lightroom gives you, so.... And yes, you are also quite right about the printers. In the meantime, I happily hop back and forth between the operating systems, using what I need. Someday, I will no longer have to do that, and I look forward to that time. Thanks for the reply.

Hornitodog
April 11th, 2012, 04:33 PM
Well, it seems I'll be making that donation to my favourite charity... Last night, and after countless hours of researching and trying other "fixes" over the last six months, I was finally able to discover a workaround to get sound out of TVTime!

I happened to download and install the "Multimedia Systems Selector" app, and then discovered that when I ran it along with TVTime (choosing ALSA for both output and input, and for "device" at input, "SAA7134PCM"), bingo, I had wonderful, clear, stable, perfectly timed, stereo sound! So for now, and until TVTime is updated to work without problem in 12.04 and other distros, I'm good.

Fisher
April 11th, 2012, 05:39 PM
Have you tried to use any virtualisation solution, like VirtualBox or VMware to run your Windows apps??
For me works great, and I don't need to reboot.
Windows tun in a window, and can even be integrated with the rest of the system.
You should give it a try!!http://ubuntuforums.org/images/smilies/guitar.gif

peyre
April 11th, 2012, 06:20 PM
True that. Its the appropriate way to disconnect your flash drive from a working computer and I think it should be a protocol every computer user learns as a simple habit. Just like how we pick up the habit to make sure your trackball mouse doesn't have dust in its trackball socket. (Yep :p I have a trackball mouse)

If you want to take it down to what we're supposed to do in a perfect world, sure. We're also supposed to come to a complete stop at a stop sign and always stay under the speed limit, but those laws are legal fictions because they just don't correspond to day-to-day realities. Yes, doing a software disconnect is the safest way to disconnect a flash drive, but it's an extra--and usually unnecessary--step in the middle of people's busy computing lives. Just sayin'.

tuxmarc
April 15th, 2012, 04:56 PM
a BLUE SCREEN OF DEATH :lolflag:

peyre
April 16th, 2012, 07:21 PM
a BLUE SCREEN OF DEATH :lolflag:

Linux has the kernel panic, the exact equivalent of a bluescreen.

tuxmarc
April 17th, 2012, 09:35 PM
Hi Peyre !


Linux has the kernel panic, the exact equivalent of a bluescreen.
True, but kernel panics have only happened after I tried to become a sorcerer ;)
On my wife's laptop (wives never listen to their husbands) it happens at random : "darling there is something strange happening" :P

MGaddict2000
April 18th, 2012, 12:06 PM
Gaming is a big issue, but like I've said in other threads, the real issue is since it's open source, multimedia companies, netflix for one, don't want to support it. It leaves too big of a hole for pirating. I don't have enough intricate knowledge to figure out how, but somebody out there has got to know how to make DRM work in Linux. The insane number of Linux variants makes writing games very difficult for companies, which means money. And for the same reason Apps don't exist for Window's Phones, because there is not enough market share, games don't exist for Linux. Linux gained a lot of ground while Windows Vista was on the market, once Windows 8 hits shelves, all the Linux communities need to bind together and try to shove open source down Microsoft's throat. If DRM could get on Linux by the end of this year, Linux could cripple Microsoft in the next 3 years.

MGaddict2000
April 18th, 2012, 12:12 PM
a BLUE SCREEN OF DEATH :lolflag:
Look in the depository, I'm pretty sure you can download a blue screen of death program. A buddy of mine did it to me when I left him alone with my laptop once. (Don't worry, it's doesn't actually hurt your computer. But it's a riot to do to a Linux Newby.)

Chame_Wizard
April 19th, 2012, 12:06 PM
Infecting people with Trojans!:guitar:

adamstuart07
April 19th, 2012, 12:42 PM
Hello Friends



Windows works better because it is integrated by one source.

Windows and its applications are more thoroughly tested in general.

Windows has a lot of good applications for monitoring the system temperature etc.

Linux is based on an archaic text command system with its GUI an after thought add on. Windows GUI is integrated and doesn't rely on text commands.

Linux is more secure.

Linux is more adaptable to specific technical needs.

Linux is free!


___________________

Submit Article (http://www.zigyasu.com/)

Handfull of Buddha
April 19th, 2012, 03:12 PM
Look in the depository, I'm pretty sure you can download a blue screen of death program. A buddy of mine did it to me when I left him alone with my laptop once. (Don't worry, it's doesn't actually hurt your computer. But it's a riot to do to a Linux Newby.)

I would love to do that to my wife :P

zombifier25
April 19th, 2012, 03:43 PM
I remembered downloading a Blue Screen of Death screensaver for Windows off TechNet a while ago. Here is its link:
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb897558
It's really, really realistic; it even simulates a Windows boot up after the BSoD (only to crash and give a BSoD again)
There are also a ton of cool stuffs on TechNet, a must have for Windows users (no, I'm not advertising. Just wanna point that out. I only recently touched Windows for checking some of my games before booting back to Ubuntu an play them via Wine)

peyre
April 19th, 2012, 04:27 PM
Infecting people with Trojans!:guitar:

Linux can actually be very good at infecting other people with trojans--hence the importance of running AV (such as ClamAV) on one's Linux box, to avoid passing on infected files.

Herpythebrony
April 19th, 2012, 11:59 PM
I only had 1 kernel panic out of the many years I used linux. And that was on Linux mint 11 kayata.

tmaranets
April 20th, 2012, 12:15 AM
Windows has the advantage over Linux distros with its gaming capabilities. Some artists might still be comfortable with Photoshop which is accessible on Windows. Still, I believe that Linux is the better OS.

Dragonbite
April 20th, 2012, 03:34 AM
Windows has the advantage over Linux distros with its gaming capabilities. Some artists might still be comfortable with Photoshop which is accessible on Windows. Still, I believe that Linux is the better OS.

"better OS" is always subjective. Some people will find Windows better (or they would not buy computers with them because not everybody is sheeple), others Apple while others will pick Android or iOS!

And it is more than just the apps, too. Photoshop and games may be part of it, but there are other reasons to choose one instead of another OS.

kathmary
April 28th, 2012, 04:33 AM
After using various versions of Linux for about 10 years, I am definately a Linux user and will stay so. I think hardware peripheral support is the weak spot. Lots of manufacturers simply do not have a linux driver. Example, canon printers. I know you can make many of these print in Linux, but they never have the functionality of the windows drivers. You can do some hacks, but that takes more time than I have. These days I use both Windows and Linux to get the most out of my computer build.

mfZero
April 29th, 2012, 01:28 AM
Run Chrome properly.

peyre
April 29th, 2012, 02:58 AM
Run Chrome properly.

Really? I'm running Chromium on both my desktop and laptop (Xubuntu and Lubuntu respectively), and actual Chrome ran fine on my desktop before I installed Chromium.

inspiredbylasers
April 29th, 2012, 03:00 AM
Ubuntu has way less 'mainstream' software available to run on it.

It is a pain, for example, to have iTunes on my Windows/Lion OSX partitions, but not be able to automatically sync to Ubuntu.

Best,
Y.

Dragonbite
April 30th, 2012, 02:50 PM
Ubuntu has way less 'mainstream' software available to run on it.

It is a pain, for example, to have iTunes on my Windows/Lion OSX partitions, but not be able to automatically sync to Ubuntu.

Best,
Y.

Not so long ago, Mac users were saying this too. Give it time is about the best I can suggest.

GHerzog
May 5th, 2012, 02:48 PM
Windows can suck the life out of your cash flow and continually keep up paranoid about buying something via updates.

Admittedly, there are things that Windows has because some of the absolute best applications are proprietary, but they cost huge amounts of money and often with that kind of cash you can afford something better in Apple.

I gave up throwing money at computers that didn't run right and moved to Ubuntu where what I have is quite stable and costs nothing.

A great deal of time was wasted on administration of updates, backups, and anti-virus in Windows that I no longer have. I found my productivity interferred with when I turned a machine on and Windows wanted to complete an update. I also have found that I couldn't turn off the machine when I wanted to; and that the update process more often than not would take over the computer when I wanted to do work.

In sum, Unix was around before Windows and got the whole computer system scheme right. Windows is still trying to work around what Unix owns.

SPARTAN-118
May 5th, 2012, 03:15 PM
I have Windows 7 on one hard drive and Ubuntu 12.04 on another. The Windows drive is 500 GB and has a separate "Libraries" partition that takes up most of the drive. The Ubuntu drive is 80 GB. If I could, I'd switch it around right now, but, as I lack an external drive to back up to, that's not possible.

Windows is a great OS. Somebody needs to tell Microsoft that, because they keep changing things to the point of being unrecognizable (just look at Windows 8, if that doesn't flop for PC users I'm going to be very surprised). However, Ubuntu is my primary OS. It is faster than Windows in general, and about the only thing I miss, to be honest, is the built-in slideshow feature for the desktop backgrounds (I currently use Wallch, but I can't figure out how to make it start when I log in). I'm sure I miss some other things, but as long as I have Firefox, a Bittorrent client, a good enough music player (the only thing Rhythmbox is missing is a "Stop after current song" feature) and a way to obtain more apps, I'm set.

Some might say "gaming", but my computer can't run anything beyond 2007 at full settings, and I refuse to turn down the graphics just to avoid lag. I am a console gamer through and through, probably because of that, so that's not really an issue for me (though when games such as Half Life run perfectly in Wine, I'm thrilled).
And Photoshop? Sure, I used to use it, but I could never afford a license for it, and GIMP does everything it does for free.

altheablue
May 5th, 2012, 08:15 PM
Play NHL streams on the sports sites. :( I hate booting my Windows partition to get my hockey fix.

szymon_g
May 5th, 2012, 08:17 PM
"What can Windows do that Linux can't?"

if you understood "linux" as a "most popular distributions of it"- than safe upgrading to the newer versions of software are impossible without upgrading whole system (sic!).
Getting proper sound from more complicated sound cards (than onboards) is hard to do (like: xtrame gamer).
Also- installing drivers without access to the Net & compiler is almost impossible in Linux

Arnoldijzermans
May 6th, 2012, 07:24 AM
generate BSOD :guitar:

Lucradia
May 6th, 2012, 07:29 AM
Install Terraria with ease.

traditionalist
May 6th, 2012, 07:58 AM
There are a couple of things that wont work, often because there is no implementation of the software for Linux, or missing drivers. There are workarounds for most things. I have installed my Windows 7 Ultimate in a VM ( VMware player) on UBUNTU 12.04 and that solved the problem with my banking software, but I still can't watch TV because there is no support for the hardware I use, ( DEVOLO TV-Sat plug). Otherwise I think UBUNTU is better than Windows for many reasons.

I have been using Windows for a very long time,( since the very first non-public release as it happens), and just recently switched to UBUNTU. Just installed 12.04 and apart from a few tweaking problems it now seems to work fine.

Regards....Trad.

peyre
May 8th, 2012, 05:08 AM
Ubuntu is my primary OS. It is faster than Windows in general, and about the only thing I miss, to be honest, is the built-in slideshow feature for the desktop backgrounds (I currently use Wallch, but I can't figure out how to make it start when I log in).

In Xubuntu, you could do that pretty easily: in Settings, you go to Session and Startup, then click Add and point it to the app you want to start on login. I don't know about mainstream Ubuntu in this regard, but maybe it has some equivalent.

mamamia88
May 8th, 2012, 04:01 PM
Play NHL streams on the sports sites. :( I hate booting my Windows partition to get my hockey fix.

you could get a ps3 and do it on there from your tv.

archolman
May 8th, 2012, 07:35 PM
CONS:
Remove large amounts of cash from your pocket.
Break office software compatibility, so you have to spend more money to maintain compatibility with other MsOffice variants.
Crash repeatedly.
Eat data without leaving any trace of the work you've done... even with autosave enabled.
Take ages to boot & shut-down.
Not install updates etc. in the background, but only do it on shutdown.


PROS:
Run many on-line games.
Run audio software like Reason, ProTools, Ableton Live, CoolEdit, (although I use Audacity now), NI synths, etc.
Stream content from LoveFilm.com & similar services.

All of the pros, apart from the games (http://off.jenkat-games.com/survey/jenkatarcade/?productsubID=128&a=13513&f=priceisright), (I'm not a gamer) is why I keep a copy of WinXP on my box.
LoveFilm might look at porting their software to Linux, if enough users write & ask for it.

oregonbob
May 8th, 2012, 10:25 PM
There is Picasa for Linux (which is quite a step if you ask me :))

Not anymore. Google is just plain evil in that it removed all traces of Picasa for linux. Why would they do that?

Just try to find a link to download even Picasa 3.0 for linux. Someone at Google gave the order to remove it all.

Tibuda
May 8th, 2012, 11:16 PM
There was not Picasa for Linux. What they called Picasa for Linux was the Windows Picasa bundled with Wine.

gtayton@nextcom.ca
May 9th, 2012, 01:51 AM
I miss most the Flying Simulator.FSX, by Usoft and can't see WINE running it yet..
alas..

oregonbob
May 10th, 2012, 03:55 AM
There was not Picasa for Linux. What they called Picasa for Linux was the Windows Picasa bundled with Wine.

Yes there was a Picasa for linux. I am aware that it used Wine for years, however there was a neat, downloadable deb package for picasa that was click and run, including mods to run on linux. It was called "Picasa for Linux". That package has been erased from existence.

Copper Bezel
May 10th, 2012, 05:56 AM
You're talking about the same thing. It was a nice, neat .deb package that installed Picasa with an invisible implementation of the Wine loader. If you install Picasa for Windows through Wine, you get the same effect. (The complete lack of desktop integration included.)

Lucradia
May 11th, 2012, 10:16 AM
Do cheat-engine properly through wine on Fortune Summoners via Steam :V

CT For Fortune Summoners: forum.cheatengine.org/viewtopic.php?t=547505

Fortune Summoners on Steam: http://store.steampowered.com/app/203510/

Make sure Use VRAM "Normal" is selected, and do "Fullscreen" or Windowed. (As a note, the game can only do 4:3 ratio (http://www.carpefulgur.com/fs/faq.htm).)

peyre
May 13th, 2012, 04:25 AM
What can't it do? Leave my god damned icons alone!!

Every now and then, Xubuntu decides it's time to f*ck with the icons on my Desktop, and it shuffles them and arranges them seemingly in random order starting at top left. Backing up and replacing xorg.conf doesn't help, apparently. What gives?

jtarin
May 13th, 2012, 04:55 AM
What can't it do? Leave my god damned icons alone!!

Every now and then, Xubuntu decides it's time to f*ck with the icons on my Desktop, and it shuffles them and arranges them seemingly in random order starting at top left. Backing up and replacing xorg.conf doesn't help, apparently. What gives?Try this fix (http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1919849)

SPARTAN-118
May 13th, 2012, 05:27 AM
Try this fix (http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1919849)
Huh... that has happened on occasion with me on Ubuntu 12.04, but as I always change the resolution back to native as soon as I am able to in game settings, it's a bit of a non-issue for me.
Really, all I have to do is right click Desktop -> Organize Icons By Name.

jtarin
May 13th, 2012, 08:31 AM
Huh... that has happened on occasion with me on Ubuntu 12.04, but as I always change the resolution back to native as soon as I am able to in game settings, it's a bit of a non-issue for me.
Really, all I have to do is right click Desktop -> Organize Icons By Name.I think you meant to quote the guy I quoted.:P

Lucradia
May 13th, 2012, 08:33 AM
Do cheat-engine properly through wine on Fortune Summoners via Steam :V

CT For Fortune Summoners: forum.cheatengine.org/viewtopic.php?t=547505

Fortune Summoners on Steam: http://store.steampowered.com/app/203510/

Make sure Use VRAM "Normal" is selected, and do "Fullscreen" or Windowed. (As a note, the game can only do 4:3 ratio (http://www.carpefulgur.com/fs/faq.htm).)

be careful on fullscreen too, the game can't do higher than 720p in 4:3 terms. So windows will be forced to scale down (and so will your workspaces as a result.)

vahnx
May 15th, 2012, 06:55 PM
Linux can do almost everything Windows can, but only half of it at a decent speed. Go ahead, dual boot Windows and 'x' distro and see how fast your browser launches. Visit youtube and open a video in full screen.

roelforg
May 15th, 2012, 06:58 PM
Linux can do almost everything Windows can, but only half of it at a decent speed. Go ahead, dual boot Windows and 'x' distro and see how fast your browser launches. Visit youtube and open a video in full screen.

I disagree, my 7 year old laptop needs 5-10s to launch firefox with 12+ tabs open and happily takes youtube at full screen with other audio/hw-intensive-software running in the background whilst delivering an uniterrupted, clear (well, as clean as youtube-vids can be ;)) audio/video feed.

weasel fierce
May 15th, 2012, 06:59 PM
Linux can do almost everything Windows can, but only half of it at a decent speed. Go ahead, dual boot Windows and 'x' distro and see how fast your browser launches. Visit youtube and open a video in full screen.

My wife's windows 7 PC has faster hardware than my Kubuntu machine and doesn't compare particularly favourable in terms of speed.

roelforg
May 15th, 2012, 07:10 PM
My wife's windows 7 PC has faster hardware than my Kubuntu machine and doesn't compare particularly favourable in terms of speed.

Amen ;)

Here's the comparison between a 2 year old Packard bell and my 7year old acer.
It doesn't look good

How about this:
Acer running ubuntu (the one i'm typing from):


Intel Centrino Dual-Core 1.5GHZ
2GB DDR2 ram
160GB sata hd
a/b/g WiFi

Packard Bell with Win7 (for school work, if it was up to me, i'd throw ubuntu on it):


Intel 1st gen Core I 5 2.53GHZ (quadcore)
4gb DDR3
500GB Sata2 hd
b/g/n WiFi


On cold boot (e.g, no sleep mode or suspend or hibernate):
Acer boot time: 60-70s until login and 10-20s to become fully usable (when unity finishes loading)
PB boot time: 5-6MINUTES until login and another 5-8MINUTES before it has finished booting to the point where the taskbar doesn't freeze the second you mouse over to it (and another 1 min until i can launch an app).

Internet surfing time:
Acer: 10-15s to load FF with 12+ tabs, new tab takes 1s at the most to become usable
PB: 30-40s to load IE with 1 tab (google homepage), new tab takes 10s to show and 20 before google loaded in it and i can edit the address bar
Acer: usually 2-4s page load
PB: usually 10-60s page load

Idle (no apps) usage:
Acer: 0-8% cpu vs. 350-390MB ram
PB: 10-20% CPU vs. 1-1.5GB ram (it isn't fair to compare this with percentages as the PB has 2x the ram)

bjje
May 15th, 2012, 07:12 PM
It looks like there is a good handwriting recognition app coming for windows and there just isn't much for linux yet. This is really important, but not enough to use M$. :P

Dragonbite
May 16th, 2012, 03:09 AM
Anything you can do
I can do better!
I can do anything
better than you!
No you can't!
Yes I can!
No you can't!
Yes I can!
Yes I can! Yes I can! Yes I caaaaan!
:guitar:

MisterGaribaldi
May 16th, 2012, 03:23 AM
Well, let's see. Windows can run the world from the dirt to the sky. I guess that's something.

KiwiNZ
May 16th, 2012, 03:59 AM
Make me cry
make me spout expletives
But never make me coffee

I2k4
May 16th, 2012, 06:41 PM
I'm enjoying dual booting and Live USB, but not being an old hand, what's struck me over the last year are:

1) Windows runs MS's own software, e.g. Office. Many users either work or have personally invested significant time and money in sophisticated Office documents that will never convert adequately into any other software.

2) Windows makes it much easier, for me anyway, to create and add devices to a home local area network for file sharing. We can play video over wi-fi from a drive attached to the main PC on a laptop or netbook with no problems. Instructions and forum threads for setting up a simple file sharing network in Samba froze me in my tracks.

leoheck
May 17th, 2012, 04:06 AM
Windows Explorer can sort in groups by filetype.
[B]OS X finder can show parent folders at same time.
Linux Nautilus can't..

:(

jtarin
May 17th, 2012, 08:53 AM
Windows Explorer can sort in groups by filetype.
[B]OS X finder can show parent folders at same time.
Linux Nautilus can't..

:(
You haven't been around Nautilus or Linux long.....have you.:P

Dragonbite
May 17th, 2012, 02:28 PM
You haven't been around Nautilus or Linux long.....have you.:P

Or Dolphin (KDE) or Thunar (Xfce).

scottbomb
May 19th, 2012, 03:31 AM
For me, this answer is easy: TELEVISION. Myth TV doesn't come close to Windows Media Center. I consider myself and advanced computer user (since 1984) and I also do some Java programming. Been fiddling with Linux for a couple of years (I'm currently learning how to write shell scripts) but I STILL can't figure out how to get that damned Myth TV to work. I got it to tune in some channels about a year ago but the quality was ****** so I gave up on it. Been trying again lately and I can't get the damned thing to play with my Hauppage tuner card. Hours and hours of googling and fiddling with configurations and I get nowhere.

On the other hand, someone who can barely use a browser can fire up Media Center and start watching TV almost immediately.

Maybe I'm in the minority, but I watch little TV but what little I do watch, Media Center records for me and I watch it on my computer. With all the other fantastic software offerings out there for Ubuntu, I'm amazed that no one has built a decent TV tuner package.

jtarin
May 19th, 2012, 04:24 AM
Link not viable.

irv
May 19th, 2012, 03:20 PM
For me, this answer is easy: TELEVISION. Myth TV doesn't come close to Windows Media Center. I consider myself and advanced computer user (since 1984) and I also do some Java programming. Been fiddling with Linux for a couple of years (I'm currently learning how to write shell scripts) but I STILL can't figure out how to get that damned Myth TV to work. I got it to tune in some channels about a year ago but the quality was ****** so I gave up on it. Been trying again lately and I can't get the damned thing to play with my Hauppage tuner card. Hours and hours of googling and fiddling with configurations and I get nowhere.

On the other hand, someone who can barely use a browser can fire up Media Center and start watching TV almost immediately.

Maybe I'm in the minority, but I watch little TV but what little I do watch, Media Center records for me and I watch it on my computer. With all the other fantastic software offerings out there for Ubuntu, I'm amazed that no one has built a decent TV tuner package.
You may want to take a look at this one also.
http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2012/01/how-to-install-ubuntu-tv-right-now-via-ppa/

oldsoundguy
May 22nd, 2012, 12:40 AM
Been messing with Myth for several years on a dedicated box. My main issue is that I can install a NVidia GT430 card (PcIE) and it will work for a while, but then it will not see the card (card has dual HDMI outputs) and wants me to load the on board system.

NOT very reliable. IF it were that important to me, would have abandoned all hope long ago.

wilee-nilee
May 22nd, 2012, 02:35 AM
Run as my primary OS's ever.

Never have never will lol.

thatguruguy
May 22nd, 2012, 02:36 AM
For me, this answer is easy: TELEVISION. Myth TV doesn't come close to Windows Media Center. I consider myself and advanced computer user (since 1984) and I also do some Java programming. Been fiddling with Linux for a couple of years (I'm currently learning how to write shell scripts) but I STILL can't figure out how to get that damned Myth TV to work. I got it to tune in some channels about a year ago but the quality was ****** so I gave up on it. Been trying again lately and I can't get the damned thing to play with my Hauppage tuner card. Hours and hours of googling and fiddling with configurations and I get nowhere.

On the other hand, someone who can barely use a browser can fire up Media Center and start watching TV almost immediately.

Maybe I'm in the minority, but I watch little TV but what little I do watch, Media Center records for me and I watch it on my computer. With all the other fantastic software offerings out there for Ubuntu, I'm amazed that no one has built a decent TV tuner package.

I notice that you haven't posted a single thread in the Mythbuntu sub-forum. I'm not sure which Hauppauge tuner you use, but most are well-supported. In fact, I wrote a How-To some time ago on how to set up the 950Q (the Hauppauge USB tuner) for Mythbuntu. MythTV is a pretty amazing package, and it's too bad you've decided not to even ask basic questions on how to get it to work for you.

SPARTAN-118
May 25th, 2012, 01:56 AM
Run as my primary OS's ever.

Never have never will lol.

Heh, same here. This fact just confirmed itself when I switched out a defective motherboard a little while back, and Windows was broken (irreparably, I might add) while Ubuntu took it in stride. The only issue I have now is that GRUB seems to be of the wrong aspect ratio and resolution for my monitor (the bottom disappears off-screen and a "Not Optimal Resolution" popup appears on my screen) but as GRUB (and the "shutting down/hibernate/etc" command line screen) are only on-screen for a little bit, I can manage. I can probably fix that in Boot-repair or something anyway.

That reminds me, does anyone know how to burn a single .tar.bz2 file across multiple discs? I'm trying to using the "split" command:
$ split --bytes=8400m largefile (bytes set to that because I'm using Dual Layer discs) but the burning process seems to fail (Brasero looked good up until a point, but K3b just fails immediately).

I realize I should probably create a separate thread, but I figured, while I'm here, might as well ask, as I'm trying to back up my "Libraries" partition before wiping my 500GB HDD and moving Ubuntu to it, then installing Windows on my 80GB drive.

ExSuSEusr
May 25th, 2012, 04:51 AM
I don't think gaming is that important to most peopleI disagree with that... and the post a few up from yours that said Photoshop. I run Photoshop on both my Mint and Ubuntu machines with no issues at all - flawlessly in fact.

As for the gaming issue. I think the Linux community overlooks the fact that typically speaking - gamers are, in many ways, computer nerds for the most part. If there is anyone that would be attracted to Linux, it'd be a gamer before your average every day "let me check my email and surf the web" type user. But, since the OS isn't friendly to gaming - I think there is a HUGE portion of the market that is being lost.

Hell, World of Warcraft alone has touted some 100 million subscribers world wide at one point. Then consider other games like EVE online, Everquest, the list goes on an on.

Even with the console market (PS and Xbox) there is somewhere up to 1 billion people world-wide that play PC based MMO's - that's JUST the MMO market. Let's not forget about the other types of PC games like Dioblo III et al. Console games have made their mark, but there is still a massive number of people who game through their PC as well.

I think that most people are like me in that they don't mind spending a evening with a mixed drink playing around with their Linux machine to configure compiz, or whatever.... but when they are forced to spend hours, if not days trying to get their games to work - and then only to find that a lot of their games even if installed won't work 100% - end up turned off and leave the OS completely - or leave it as a partition they hardly use.

Again, when you have the MMO's alone pushing a total (collectively) a billion players world-wide then you add those who are more into the PC version of CoD or Diablo.....

It blows me away that Linux still has its back turned to the gaming community - as if to admit it has absolutely no idea how big gaming really is, in the big picture.

Sure, you have Cedega, PlayonLinux and the like and that's all well and good but they don't touch the tip of the ice burg when it's all said and done... but whatever... Linux hasn't listened to gamers up to this point, so why would it now?

In a way it reminds me of an old man... an old man that runs a record company - and sees that millions and millions of music lovers are screaming for MP3 versions of their favorite songs, and the old man CEO ignores them and keeps making 8 Track Tapes and then wonders why his "company" can't keep up with Company X that is giving the customers what they want....

Not complaining - just saying.

Gaming is LOT bigger of an issue than you think. I think part of the problem is that the people who care the least are those who simply don't game.

I'm not suggesting that turning Linux into a gamer's dream OS is the answer - BUT if Linux was gaming friendly (and by that I mean easier to install and run the games without hours of endless tweaking) it could take a huge bite out of the market to the point it could make MS nervous.

Start a poll and ask people what the number reason they still keep a version of Windows on their computer and I'll bet you a year's salary the majority of the answers will be "gaming."

Think about it....

Here's a couple of links to help you see:

http://www.extremetech.com/gaming/97047-thank-you-farmville-pc-gaming-will-soon-overtake-consoles

http://blogs.imediaconnection.com/blog/2011/03/14/forecast-for-pc-gaming-industry-looks-rosy/

A quote from the second link:


Powerhouse Electronic Arts (http://www.ea.com) is somewhat upbeat too. In an interview with Gamasutra (http://www.gamasutra.com), EA Games President Frank Gibeau said MMORPG’s (massively multiplayer online role-playing game) and other PC games will continue to be a key revenue producer for EA.

“The user base is gigantic,” said Gibeau. “PC retail may be a big problem, but PC downloads are awesome. The margins are much better and we don’t have any rules in terms of first approvals. From our perspective, it’s an extremely health platform. It’s totally conceivable it will become our biggest platform.”
That's from EA.... one of the biggest game producers out there... admitting that PC platform games could over take console games as their company's biggest sellers. But, yes, let's continue to ignore gaming and write it off like an irrelevant past time that most people "don't really care about."

I have a business degree and for the life of me I can't understand why Linux (as a whole) just can't see the error of its ways. Why in God's name would you turn your back on one of the most important uses of a personal computer and write it off with "well just keep a Windows partition handy" why? It blows me away.....

We all want Linux to be big - we want it to take over Windows as the world's OS... but... anyway.... deaf ears.

And, before you start giving me all kinds of reasons.... Ubuntu is one of the best versions of Linux out there... it can basically do anything. If [they] can create an OS that out-of-the-box can pretty much do anything that Windows can do - literally. You can't tell me [they] can't make the OS or any other flavor of Linux game friendly. I don't buy it. [They] just don't care. It's not a priority. And, because of that potentially billions of potential users get left on the curb.

Mikeb85
May 25th, 2012, 07:53 AM
You can't tell me [they] can't make the OS or any other flavor of Linux game friendly. I don't buy it. [They] just don't care. It's not a priority. And, because of that potentially billions of potential users get left on the curb.

Ubuntu is fairly 'game friendly'. It is. Look at Oil Rush - phenomenal graphics, and it runs super smooth, or X-Plane 10 - probably the best flight sim ever, and great AAA graphics. It's the game studios that need to catch up. Of course, I never thought I'd see the day OSX has so many titles, so it's perfectly conceivable Ubuntu will be the same in a few years.

zombifier25
May 25th, 2012, 09:41 AM
Ubuntu is fairly 'game friendly'. It is. Look at Oil Rush - phenomenal graphics, and it runs super smooth, or X-Plane 10 - probably the best flight sim ever, and great AAA graphics. It's the game studios that need to catch up. Of course, I never thought I'd see the day OSX has so many titles, so it's perfectly conceivable Ubuntu will be the same in a few years.

Agree. Many games studios (like EA) are having a look at Ubuntu/Linux now, because it's growing very fast in the recent years.

Dragonbite
May 25th, 2012, 02:03 PM
Seems a number of games are coming to Ubuntu, and the Ubuntu Store is helping to make this easy and seamless.

jtarin
May 25th, 2012, 02:21 PM
That reminds me, does anyone know how to burn a single .tar.bz2 file across multiple discs? I'm trying to using the "split" command:
$ split --bytes=8400m largefile (bytes set to that because I'm using Dual Layer discs) but the burning process seems to fail (Brasero looked good up until a point, but K3b just fails immediately).

I realize I should probably create a separate thread, but I figured, while I'm here, might as well ask, as I'm trying to back up my "Libraries" partition before wiping my 500GB HDD and moving Ubuntu to it, then installing Windows on my 80GB drive.I use HJSplit (http://www.hjsplit.org/linux/) for things like this.

SPARTAN-118
May 25th, 2012, 10:33 PM
I use HJSplit (http://www.hjsplit.org/linux/) for things like this.

Thanks, I'll give it a try. Seems to be basically a GUI for the split/cat commands, but was made by people who know what they're doing...
Unlike me...

EDIT: Okay, I tried it, and it fails. Epically.
I let it go for somewhere around three or more hours.
It never got past 2%.
Ironically, the file it was creating was getting bigger, so it was doing something, at least.
However, I must say, "No, thank you" and stick to using the "split" command for now. That would have not only consumed less system resources (comp was slooow) but it also would have completed infinity times faster.
Thanks anyway, though.

jtarin
May 26th, 2012, 04:00 AM
Thanks, I'll give it a try. Seems to be basically a GUI for the split/cat commands, but was made by people who know what they're doing...
Unlike me...

EDIT: Okay, I tried it, and it fails. Epically.
I let it go for somewhere around three or more hours.
It never got past 2%.
Ironically, the file it was creating was getting bigger, so it was doing something, at least.
However, I must say, "No, thank you" and stick to using the "split" command for now. That would have not only consumed less system resources (comp was slooow) but it also would have completed infinity times faster.
Thanks anyway, though.

I will admit to it taking a long time but I have never had a problem with putting the files back together. There's always .rar if you want to split into volumes. How the file is packaged before splitting can have a bearing.

Musicmaker384
May 26th, 2012, 04:56 AM
I'll be honest, I don't really see Linux as much of a gaming platform. Originally, I installed Ubuntu so I could fall back on it if Windows started having problems. Now I'm using it for all my schoolwork. I have heard, however, that they're developing a version of Steam that will run on Linux, and that'll be nice.

In response to the original question: Pretty much nothing.

benjamin.s.vaccaro
May 27th, 2012, 01:10 AM
Biggest thing for me is that windows can run Office Suite. Honestly, Libre and OpenOffice are so pitiful that I now use google docs until I can jump onto Word or Excel. There really is no comparison and Ubuntu needs to recognize that if it is going to be a competitor in the personal and business OS markets that they need to provide basic office programs that are as GUI dependent as the Office Suite.

The only other thing Window's offers is a splitting headache.

ExSuSEusr
May 27th, 2012, 04:09 AM
Actually, Ubuntu (Linux) can run MS Office just fine.

Go to your software manager or Synaptic and get PlayonLinux. Install it. Pop in your MS Office disk and install. I use MS Office all the time and without any problems.

I do believe PlayonLinux will even install the MS core fonts for you too...

I am not sure how much you know about the program - but it will also install a complete Wine (including Wine Tricks) for you as well.

Hralgmir
May 28th, 2012, 10:35 PM
Heh, same here. This fact just confirmed itself when I switched out a defective motherboard a little while back, and Windows was broken (irreparably, I might add) while Ubuntu took it in stride. The only issue I have now is that GRUB seems to be of the wrong aspect ratio and resolution for my monitor (the bottom disappears off-screen and a "Not Optimal Resolution" popup appears on my screen) but as GRUB (and the "shutting down/hibernate/etc" command line screen) are only on-screen for a little bit, I can manage. I can probably fix that in Boot-repair or something anyway.

That reminds me, does anyone know how to burn a single .tar.bz2 file across multiple discs? I'm trying to using the "split" command:
$ split --bytes=8400m largefile (bytes set to that because I'm using Dual Layer discs) but the burning process seems to fail (Brasero looked good up until a point, but K3b just fails immediately).

I realize I should probably create a separate thread, but I figured, while I'm here, might as well ask, as I'm trying to back up my "Libraries" partition before wiping my 500GB HDD and moving Ubuntu to it, then installing Windows on my 80GB drive.

You could uncomment and set #GRUB_GFXMODE=640x480 in /etc/default/grub to something like GRUB_GFXMODE=1400x1050,1024x768,640x480, with your preferred resolution and secondary choices if desired, then run update-grub, if that doesn't work change this line in /etc/grub.d/00_header to the correct resolution instead of 'auto', then run update-grub.
if [ "x${GRUB_GFXMODE}" = "x" ] ; then GRUB_GFXMODE=auto ; fi
I read something that might work for the multi disc file while making bootable bios floppies. You mount an image file in a loop, and dd it to the floppy.
I cannot remember all the details but it is possible to select a portion of the file defined by byte numbers, so if you could dd sections to successive discs and dd them back to another mounted loop then this approach might work. Research 'mount' , 'loop' and 'dd' and related items, this may help.
One thing I could not do in Linux was create a Dell CPx bios floppy - these old files lack the options to get at the image, Wine could not help, so I used an old Windows 98 desktop with a floppy drive!
Surely much of the problem with games lies with the game companies - if they were to compile versions for Linux, this would resolve it. As the code is not open source then the Linux community cannot readily convert it. Writing new games for Linux would be another option, and I think there are several out there in the Software Centre. I find reading man pages entertainment enough, myself.
Back in ye oldene dayes there were magazines full of listings of code (programs) for games. You typed them in - and often had to correct typos to debug them so they worked. This was before the internet. Maybe there are places you can find listings of code for games on the net. This was great fun when I was a kid, and it was nice to play your own games. You could modify them as well to suit your inclinations.

archolman
June 9th, 2012, 07:54 PM
Biggest thing for me is that windows can run Office Suite. Honestly, Libre and OpenOffice are so pitiful that I now use google docs until I can jump onto Word or Excel. There really is no comparison and Ubuntu needs to recognize that if it is going to be a competitor in the personal and business OS markets that they need to provide basic office programs that are as GUI dependent as the Office Suite.

The only other thing Window's offers is a splitting headache.
:) Yes, it does, doesn't it.

I use OO.o, & find it absolutely fine. What do you want that OO isn't capable? I'm not an office power-user, or whatever the current phrasing is, but a small business/domestic user, so I may be missing something in the subtleties of the programs.

I use DropBox instead of GoogleDocs, & like the desktop/Nautilus integration, that means I can just click the icon & open the relevant document, without a browser running first.

I can see why you may be reluctant to use LO, as it's still lagging a bit behind OO, I think.

Have you tried StarOffice? Still developed, & much cheaper than MSOffice. Again, I don't know what the differences are between the 2 for a power-user.

Dragonbite
June 10th, 2012, 03:32 AM
:) Yes, it does, doesn't it.

I use OO.o, & find it absolutely fine. What do you want that OO isn't capable? I'm not an office power-user, or whatever the current phrasing is, but a small business/domestic user, so I may be missing something in the subtleties of the programs.

I use DropBox instead of GoogleDocs, & like the desktop/Nautilus integration, that means I can just click the icon & open the relevant document, without a browser running first.

I can see why you may be reluctant to use LO, as it's still lagging a bit behind OO, I think.

Have you tried StarOffice? Still developed, & much cheaper than MSOffice. Again, I don't know what the differences are between the 2 for a power-user.

OpenOffice.org, LibreOffice and StarOffice are basically the same thing, just at varying degrees of development.

Microsoft Office includes a number of features that I haven't found in the LO/OO.o variety.

One such feature is handling graphics. MS Office allows a file (Word, Excel, PowerPoint) to easily insert a windows screenshot or a clipping of a window, and provides options such as borders, shadow, glowing edges and mirror images.

As far as I know, those actions require additional program or programs outside of Libre/OpenOffice to do the same.

This may not seem like much, but when putting together documents that include documents this takes what would need 3 or so programs in Linux, and reduces it to 2-3 clicks.

I am sure there are other features, but this is one that I've noticed because I use it fairly often in Office. I use it for documenting directions on how to use a program and in 2-3 clicks I have the modified screenshot exactly the way I want it, and without having to save it as a separate image file.

emagar
June 11th, 2012, 12:31 AM
Use wine to run stata (statistical software) for windows. Purchased a copy years ago that I sometimes need instead of R. Haven't managed to run it properly in Linux via wine.

emagar
June 11th, 2012, 12:32 AM
Manage iPod touch properly

ExSuSEusr
June 11th, 2012, 04:49 AM
Open Office is like notepad compared to MS Office.

I know it's free and for most people, sure it gets the job done. But, in the bigger picture Open Office is very weak, hell any time I tried to save a file as something other odt it would corrupt it.

As much as I dislike "that company" I have to give credit where credit is due - MS Office is pretty damn powerful and user friendly.

If OO was any good I'd not have to keep MS Office in wine just do real life work.

I guess that's the one big thing (for me) that Windows can do that Linux can't... run a powerful, reliable, and fast Office suite - without needing wine or playonlinux to only get half the suite to work.

peyre
June 11th, 2012, 05:05 AM
Open Office is like notepad compared to MS Office.

I know it's free and for most people, sure it gets the job done. But, in the bigger picture Open Office is very weak, hell any time I tried to save a file as something other odt it would corrupt it.

As much as I dislike "that company" I have to give credit where credit is due - MS Office is pretty damn powerful and user friendly.

If OO was any good I'd not have to keep MS Office in wine just do real life work.

MS Office is a fantastic product, but I've found that OpenOffice and LibreOffice are exceptionally good at duplicating it. It's true they don't have 100% compatibility, but I'd put it close to 95%. I regularly save documents in old-fashioned .doc format, and have never had one corrupted. They do mess with the formatting now and then--was that what you meant by "corrupted"?

ExSuSEusr
June 11th, 2012, 05:10 AM
MS Office is a fantastic product, but I've found that OpenOffice and LibreOffice are exceptionally good at duplicating it. It's true they don't have 100% compatibility, but I'd put it close to 95%. I regularly save documents in old-fashioned .doc format, and have never had one corrupted. They do mess with the formatting now and then--was that what you meant by "corrupted"?

Yeah, my office uses Windows and MS Office products exclusively. But, I use Ubuntu and Mint on my home machine / laptop. When I travel or work from home I like using my Linux machines (for obvious reasons).

Now and then I get the urge to go ahead and work in OO - "just to see" and sure enough every time I try to save my work in any other format than odt - I end up having to redo it all in MS Office. MS Office won't open the .doc file from my OO installs. Says they're "corrupt..." And, on the occasions it does open it's all screwed up so badly I can't use it.

So, I just use MS Office with wine.

Copper Bezel
June 11th, 2012, 10:46 AM
The corruption thing is unusual. For me, Word usually complains, then opens the damn file anyway.

Losing all manner of formatting so that you're better off starting with a fresh document isn't, of course. LibreOffice does amazing things to a perfectly good .docx file to the point that it can't, itself, render the document properly if you save and reopen.

I actually don't see many problems with the legacy .doc format, though.

kelvin spratt
June 11th, 2012, 11:19 AM
Open Office is like notepad compared to MS Office.

I know it's free and for most people, sure it gets the job done. But, in the bigger picture Open Office is very weak, hell any time I tried to save a file as something other odt it would corrupt it.

As much as I dislike "that company" I have to give credit where credit is due - MS Office is pretty damn powerful and user friendly.

If OO was any good I'd not have to keep MS Office in wine just do real life work.

I guess that's the one big thing (for me) that Windows can do that Linux can't... run a powerful, reliable, and fast Office suite - without needing wine or playonlinux to only get half the suite to work.

Perhaps its Ms Office thats has comparability problems, People are to quick to put the finger of blame> Ms goes out of its way to be incompatible. try softmaker office for Linux instead.

irv
June 11th, 2012, 01:53 PM
Open Office is like notepad compared to MS Office.

I know it's free and for most people, sure it gets the job done. But, in the bigger picture Open Office is very weak, hell any time I tried to save a file as something other odt it would corrupt it.

As much as I dislike "that company" I have to give credit where credit is due - MS Office is pretty damn powerful and user friendly.

If OO was any good I'd not have to keep MS Office in wine just do real life work.

I guess that's the one big thing (for me) that Windows can do that Linux can't... run a powerful, reliable, and fast Office suite - without needing wine or playonlinux to only get half the suite to work.

If you really want to use MSOffice check out this thread.
http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2000780

kelvin spratt
June 11th, 2012, 02:25 PM
I really don't know what you guys do
My wife uses Ms exclusively at work, I only use Linux she jumps on my desktop opens up her work from the office and never complains about Libreoffice,
Perhaps its cause she is Ms word/excel/power-point certified, and knows what she is doing?.

Dragonbite
June 11th, 2012, 02:41 PM
I really don't know what you guys do
My wife uses Ms exclusively at work, I only use Linux she jumps on my desktop opens up her work from the office and never complains about Libreoffice,
Perhaps its cause she is Ms word/excel/power-point certified, and knows what she is doing?.

Does the documents have a fair amount of formatting changes (columns, fonts, word art, image placement, title/header/normal styles, mail merge, etc.?

I find if I am working with less-formatted files, just mostly basic text with basic effects (bold, italic, underline) it comes through fine with little (font) changes.

When it starts to get more complicated, even just adding a table sometimes, is when I see files not formatted correctly.

Some day, maybe MS Office Online will be powerful enough to use, but right now it is worse than even OO.o/LO! I jump to Google Docs if I need cross-compatibility until the "finishing touches" are needed, then decide which format I will do it in.

I haven't tried, though, to upload a Word or Excel file to Google Docs, and then download it as an .ODT format and see if it keeps the formatting.

And honstely, I am preferring the Ribbon menus than the old "buttons-buttons-everywhere" method.

Copper Bezel
June 11th, 2012, 03:10 PM
The ribbon is definitely an improvement over a stack of eight toolbars. In LO, I just cut down the toolbar to the items I need.


Perhaps its cause she is Ms word/excel/power-point certified, and knows what she is doing?.
I don't see any purpose to this comment except to be insulting. It doesn't jive. Using Office (either one) for most of us means often dealing with files someone else created, anyway. And it certainly doesn't take certification to use either one (and if it did, that would be exceedingly poor software design.)

Page breaks, header styles, application of default fonts, and comments and markup have all broken for me in one form or another when opening and saving .docx files. I couldn't actually save comments to a .docx file until 3.5. Files routinely load with odd substitutions for default fonts, even though I have the MS Core fonts installed, or odd extra page breaks at seemingly random intervals. And yesterday, shortly before I posted, I saved an edited, marked-up .docx document, a student's paper, only to have it load with only one page visible. I had to start over, dig my comments out of the xml, and save as a .doc this time.

And sure, the student's paper was formatted very poorly to begin with, with a lot of text jacked around using what were probably the wrong features; the user did not, in fact, know what he was doing as you say. But I don't have any control over that, and I don't know how much of that affects the translation for LibreOffice in the first place. Using LO caused problems for me I wouldn't be experiencing if I were just using MS Word in the first place.

I don't have any of these problems with .doc, which is frustrating, given that .doc is a binary file the OO folks reverse engineered, where .docx is open xml.

irv
June 11th, 2012, 05:34 PM
This seems to have turned into a discussion about the Office products; open source and MS Office. Maybe someone should open a new thread on this. Also I posted a link http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2000780 to this thread about running MS Office in Ubuntu Linux using Codeweavers Cross Over for Linux. If you need to keep the documents exactly the same maybe you need to move in that direction if you don't want to install Window and do a dual boot.
The only time I have had problems was if I use Impress to do a presentation and then try to display it with MS PowerPoint. Wrong font, no background etc. To get around this I keep Open Source Office on the computer I want to run the side show on.

Copper Bezel
June 12th, 2012, 03:46 AM
Well, no, it was turning to a discussion of whether or not LO was actually a replacement for MS Office, because someone claimed it was. Of course you can run Office under Linux; that's not what anyone was talking about.

paulkiss
June 12th, 2012, 07:03 AM
Well, I've never been a poweruser of MSO, all my needs were some basic formattin in .doc and some maybe a little extended but still nothing fancy formulas/functions usage in .xls.

For quite a time I used OO, and frankly, I wasn't really satisfied with it in terms of its behaviour, the menues seemed to respond a little awkward... but still it gave me all the functionality I needed.

And since I installed Ubuntu on all my devices, I became a Libreoffice user. It meets all my needs. Since I have to use Windows and MSO at work, I still keep things in .doc and .xls format. And LibreOffice didn't ever corrupt anything significant, I mean some serious stuff like formulas, references etc.

Well, yeah, of course the very display of a document isn't 100% of what one sees in MSO. Especially regarding colors, sometimes fonts (the default font in Excel is Arial whereas there's no arial kind of stuff in my Ubuntu). Some things are different. But all in all, I'm happy with Libreoffice, and I wouldn't ever need any MSO at all.

Besides, I've never really bought MSO. Coz it's hell lot of money. Yes, I had to use used the unclean stuff at home, and the stuff bought by the organization at work. And it's a pleasure to use a clean office suite without all that piracy crap.

DennisMesa
August 15th, 2012, 02:12 AM
I have been using Linux, one distro or another since 2007. It has it's quirks, but no where near what Windows has. Using Libre Office took a little time to figure out, but for my use, it's perfect.

Bucky Ball
August 15th, 2012, 02:19 AM
... a lot of professionals miss Photoshop.

And more graphics professionals are starting to use Gimp and Linux, at least some of the time and for some tasks. In film and FX professionals are creating their own code and apps in Linux and have both Mac and Linux boxes, particularly in film and FX. Why? Because they can't buy what they're after off the shelf. ;)

Mikeb85
August 15th, 2012, 04:49 AM
Inherently there's not really anything that one can do that the other can't. Obviously Windows has the better proprietary software selection, and Linux has some inherent technical advantages.

For me, I use Linux because it doesn't have the annoying slow-down issues that Windows has, installing open source tools is incredibly easy, and I can tailor the OS to exactly what I want. Not to mention the stability and security is better on Linux.

There's nothing Windows can do that Linux can't, it really depends on what kind of software you need to use... These days though Windows is required less and less...

irv
August 15th, 2012, 02:17 PM
I believe it boils down to this. Big business uses Windows because there is software especially designed for certain tasks. I worked in manufacturing where we used special software designed to run on Windows and not Linux. Because of this we were forced into using Windows.

Now in the office environment Software was use for Windows to be compatible with our customers and suppliers. Windows has the industry locked down. This is going to be hard to break.

The thing that is helping Linux is equipment and instruments that are coming with Linux pre-installed on them. Things are changing but it will still take time for this to happen. Just look at what is happening with many hand held units like pads, phone, tables and etc. And take names like Android, Google OS, and all the other Linux distros. I have seen a lot of changes in my time.

So what can windows do that Linux can't. The answer is really, NOTHING! Linux can do everything and more that Windows can do when given a chance. And in many cases do it better.

afulldeck
September 4th, 2012, 02:05 AM
The only thing I think Windows does better than Linux is OneNote combined with the Snipping tool. The equivalents in Linux just don't have the flexibility that I can find.

arizonalarry2
September 4th, 2012, 06:50 AM
Well it can play a YouTube video for starters.

krishna.988
September 4th, 2012, 06:55 AM
Well it can play a YouTube video for starters.

Yes as there is not going to be flash support for linux...

kubOSuser
September 4th, 2012, 10:31 AM
windows 95-xp/vista/7 is sooo easy to use!

irv
September 4th, 2012, 01:06 PM
Yes as there is not going to be flash support for linux...

2 WAYS OF PLAYING YOUTUBE VIDEOS WITHOUT FLASH WITH JUST ONE CLICK [LINUX] (http://www.webupd8.org/2010/03/2-ways-of-playing-youtube-videos.html)

newb85
September 4th, 2012, 01:37 PM
windows 95-xp/vista/7 is sooo easy to use!

This comment doesn't seem to be a comparison--no mention of Linux/Ubuntu.

My experience is that Windows isn't any easier than Ubuntu. Some people just make Ubuntu harder than it has to be by wanting it to do things "the Windows way" or wanting it to run Windows software.

Admittedly, I have limited experience with Windows 7, but I did try it out for a few hours, and quickly ran back to Ubuntu. But I do have what I would call extensive user experience with Vista, XP, and...gulp...95. [Cue scary music.]

Anecdotal evidence will always have counterexamples, and at the end of the day, "easy" is a very subjective metric, but still one that many will base decisions on.

newb85
September 4th, 2012, 01:38 PM
Leave ports open by default.

newb85
September 4th, 2012, 01:39 PM
Charge a single-machine user hundreds for software licenses.

krishna.988
September 4th, 2012, 02:58 PM
2 WAYS OF PLAYING YOUTUBE VIDEOS WITHOUT FLASH WITH JUST ONE CLICK [LINUX] (http://www.webupd8.org/2010/03/2-ways-of-playing-youtube-videos.html)


I see an issue here workarounds, workarounds and workarounds..Half of the time in life is wasted in W O R K A R O U N D S... for simple things in L I N U X..

Scabby_al
September 4th, 2012, 03:29 PM
I see an issue here workarounds, workarounds and workarounds..Half of the time in life is wasted in W O R K A R O U N D S... for simple things in L I N U X..

sudo apt-get install ubuntu-restricted-extras ubuntu-restricted-addons or use Chrome.

Playing Flash content in Linux has been well covered over many many years.

mamamia88
September 4th, 2012, 04:28 PM
The only thing I think Windows does better than Linux is OneNote combined with the Snipping tool. The equivalents in Linux just don't have the flexibility that I can find.

seriously snipping tool? what can that do that decent screenshot app can't? and besides why the heck do they call it snipping tool? i always forget what it's called in windows and can never find it. oh i just thought of a new one. give the user a brand new interface that nobody asked for. oh wait.

Dragonbite
September 4th, 2012, 06:13 PM
oh i just thought of a new one. give the user a brand new interface that nobody asked for. oh wait.

Hey, Unity isn't that bad! :lolflag: Even Gnome-shell is growing on me..

LiamOS
September 4th, 2012, 06:28 PM
oh i just thought of a new one. give the user a brand new interface that nobody asked for. oh wait.

Ubuntu sent me running when Unity came out, and now I spend my days sitting in front of two terminals in xmonad watching gcc output.
I'm completely happy with that, but I don't think I should be. :P

cbanakis
September 4th, 2012, 07:53 PM
Not a fan of Unity either.
(Started using Cairo-Dock instead)

The only thing I still use Windows for now, is for my HTPC's (Theater, Living Room, Bedroom)

I have found a lot of comparable linux options, but they are always missing something.
(Usually live TV support)

Unfortunately, there is no alternative to Windows Media Center, when it comes to my needs. :(

Also, Windows has more professional software available. (Adobe)

doktorOblivion
September 4th, 2012, 07:57 PM
Yes, I would say there are a few good apps that still have no analog on Linux; therein lies the reason I still use Win7 for some things like Photoshop. I find Gimp laudable but more difficult to use, even though I believe it contains all the same funtions.
Aside from that I prefer XUbuntu.

Scabby_al
September 5th, 2012, 04:23 AM
Yes, I would say there are a few good apps that still have no analog on Linux; therein lies the reason I still use Win7 for some things like Photoshop. I find Gimp laudable but more difficult to use, even though I believe it contains all the same funtions.
Aside from that I prefer XUbuntu.

This is my struggle as well. All my business apps are Windows only so I either have to find a work around in Linux (like email) to having to run a VM on top of Linux. I can't wait for the day I can just run Linux and be done with Windows.

krishna.988
September 5th, 2012, 07:03 AM
This is my struggle as well. All my business apps are Windows only so I either have to find a work around in Linux (like email) to having to run a VM on top of Linux. I can't wait for the day I can just run Linux and be done with Windows.

Running VM gives access to Windows Applications..but for that you need a Windows license.. So what is the point in running Ubuntu then on top of that Windows VM..instead if you have a license one can run windows directly..

Jakin
September 5th, 2012, 07:12 AM
Running VM gives access to Windows Applications..but for that you need a Windows license.. So what is the point in running Ubuntu then on top of that Windows VM..instead if you have a license one can run windows directly..

With VM you don't need to fiddle around and allocate a partition for one. Removing it is as easy as deleting a file.

Scabby_al
September 5th, 2012, 12:33 PM
With VM you don't need to fiddle around and allocate a partition for one. Removing it is as easy as deleting a file.

You can also sandbox Windows and easily revert back to an earlier state if something breaks. I do it because I can use the features I like in Linux with the apps I use in Windows. I like having desktop notification, Gnome-Sushi and other file management tools, etc.

bwallum
September 5th, 2012, 02:20 PM
Linux has problems running HDMI audio through some nVidia cards, the geforce 210 is one I'm having trouble with at the moment. This affects running multimedia through TVs, an increasingly popular choice. Nouveau (the default open source driver) runs the video but not sound and so the proprietory nVidia driver is needed. However this does not always work as well in non Windows systems, nVidia linux drivers lag behind somewhat and easily break when updated.

When will Nouveau handle HDMI sound?

irv
September 5th, 2012, 03:26 PM
I have read in some of the post on this thread about windows working well with hardware where Linux doesn't. Here is my take on this.
Hardware manufactures have always worked with MS to make sure there hardware works with windows OS' because it is the bulk of the market. Now that Linux is in it growing stage of life it is getting better not so much because of the hardware manufactures supporting Linux it is those in the Linux community that are working to get the non supported hardware to work with Linux.

One more fact that comes into account is we have not only have different flavors of Linux but we also have so many different Desktop Environments to deal with. All these factors come into play when dealing with hardware and support. (This is why we need more testers who use different hardware.)

I have learned that if you want to run Linux make sure your hardware will work with it. This is why we need more computer manufactures offering Linux preinstalled on their products.

With that said I would like to add, that I have found older hardware at used stores and thrift sales that works very well with Linux. When new stuff comes out it sometimes take awhile to get it to work well with Linux because the manufacture designed it to work with Windows. (But it can work with Linux if software drivers are so design to make it work.)

Bucky Ball
September 6th, 2012, 03:19 AM
The only thing I think Windows does better than Linux is OneNote combined with the Snipping tool. The equivalents in Linux just don't have the flexibility that I can find.

Tried Zotero with the Openoffice/Libreoffice plugin? I've just done a five year degree using that. I have no idea what the snipping tool is, though.

mamamia88
September 6th, 2012, 04:51 AM
Tried Zotero with the Openoffice/Libreoffice plugin? I've just done a five year degree using that. I have no idea what the snipping tool is, though.

screenshot app

krishna.988
September 6th, 2012, 07:11 AM
Windows can do everything that Linux does, but Linux can't do everything that Windows does..

bijupp
September 6th, 2012, 07:38 AM
I think the main problems ubuntu & windows is ...


It is difficult install programs in ubuntu (sorry i am not an expert!! in ubuntu) and having a limited internet connectivity I do internet activities mostly from outside even downloads... in windows it is quiet easy just download the setup.exe or install.exe and just double click on it.. the programs are installed for a normal user in ubuntu it is very difficult as there are many commands and settings have to be typed

The unity interface make much difficult for an average windows user to migrate. there are many customizing programmes are avilable but nothing works very fine.


But ofcourse I like its speed and easily installing printers and other general hardwares make ubuntu A step ahead and the important one VIRUS FREE and free downloads make me in love with ubuntu...

irv
September 6th, 2012, 02:16 PM
I think the main problems ubuntu & windows is ...


It is difficult install programs in ubuntu (sorry i am not an expert!! in ubuntu) and having a limited internet connectivity I do internet activities mostly from outside even downloads... in windows it is quiet easy just download the setup.exe or install.exe and just double click on it.. the programs are installed for a normal user in ubuntu it is very difficult as there are many commands and settings have to be typed

The unity interface make much difficult for an average windows user to migrate. there are many customizing programmes are avilable but nothing works very fine.


But ofcourse I like its speed and easily installing printers and other general hardwares make ubuntu A step ahead and the important one VIRUS FREE and free downloads make me in love with ubuntu...

Installing a program: what could be more easier then doing a

sudo apt-get install [the program name]
or downloading a .deb file and running it to install it. No different then running an .exe file in windows.

If you gave someone a computer with windows on it that never used it before it would look strange to them until they used it for awhile. It is the same with Ubuntu and Unity. strange at first but after you use it for awhile it becomes easier.

irv
September 6th, 2012, 02:24 PM
Windows can do everything that Linux does, but Linux can't do everything that Windows does..

I don't believe this statement is fully true. I have used Windows since the release of Win 3.0, now I am totally windows free (Only use Linux) and I use it for everything and I found I can do everything I did in Windows now with Linux with no problems. Remember Linux comes in many many flavors and on many different devices and we are using it everyday even if you don't think you are.

Lucradia
September 6th, 2012, 02:58 PM
Some Linux programs are better than Windows (pitivi) but can't run on Windows.

Dragonbite
September 6th, 2012, 04:11 PM
Windows can do everything that Linux does, but Linux can't do everything that Windows does..

SCP

In Linux it is usually built-in and I am able to set up a bookmark to access the (work's web) server and manipulate the files as if it were a local copy. This includes opening, editing and saving. Since it is through the local file manager I can also drag it to my desktop, another folder, an email, whatever.

In Windows, which does not have this built in, I have to use a 3rd party application and manipulate the files in that application. To move to a local copy I have to, in the program, navigate to where I want to save it and then drag it from server to local (or vice verse).

So technically, Windows can't (but they have an application that does for them).

Open the others partition formats

Windows requires a 3rd party application to open Ext2 & 3 (and probably 4 now) formats while many Linux distributions can out-of-the-box open Fat and NTFS.

Disclaimer

Of course Windows doesn't do much, neither does Linux. It is all of the additional applications that can be put on top of these frameworks that does all of the real work.

krishna.988
September 6th, 2012, 04:26 PM
And also one thing I noticed in ubuntu a while back is hardware issues, crazy lockups of system without any reason..wasting time to figure out what was the issue...Once I installed windows everything was smooth.. HARDWARE SUPPORT is a major concern I guess..

irv
September 6th, 2012, 05:56 PM
And also one thing I noticed in ubuntu a while back is hardware issues, crazy lockups of system without any reason..wasting time to figure out what was the issue...Once I installed windows everything was smooth.. HARDWARE SUPPORT is a major concern I guess..

I move away from Windows because of lockups and the blue screen of death. I really never had any problems with lockup with Linux until lately, but I think I found the problem. It was not Linux but a program running in Linux that was causing the problem. It wasn't hardware but software.

But we must remember every problem is alway on a case by case bases. Sometimes hardware sometimes software.

Mikeb85
September 6th, 2012, 08:16 PM
And also one thing I noticed in ubuntu a while back is hardware issues, crazy lockups of system without any reason..wasting time to figure out what was the issue...Once I installed windows everything was smooth.. HARDWARE SUPPORT is a major concern I guess..

Have you tried installing Windows on a system built from scratch, and not one that comes pre-installed with Windows? Even better, if you don't have driver CDs?

Windows is only easy when manufacturers pre-install it, Linux is actually much easier when you're doing it from scratch...

Dragonbite
September 6th, 2012, 08:33 PM
And also one thing I noticed in ubuntu a while back is hardware issues, crazy lockups of system without any reason..wasting time to figure out what was the issue...Once I installed windows everything was smooth.. HARDWARE SUPPORT is a major concern I guess..

Every time I have had to reinstall Windows XP, I need to have a spare computer to go and download the NIC drivers. After I get that working then I can start getting video, sound, etc. working.

Windows 7 was the most "Linux-like" in that with video (maybe wireless too) I need to go and manually select to "update driver" before I could get it to work.

On this same machine, I haven't had to bother with drivers for video, wireless, etc.

Buntu Bunny
September 7th, 2012, 01:30 AM
Get free hardware support! Anytime I've had hardware issues and had to call tech support, they balk when I till them I use Ubuntu Linux.

"We don't support Linux" they tell me.

"Yeah, well Linux supports you." I think outloud.

The result is that they want to pass me off to advanced tech support, usually at about $150 a shot. This is the only reason I keep Windows on a partition on my computer. :D

irv
September 7th, 2012, 03:09 AM
Get free hardware support! Anytime I've had hardware issues and had to call tech support, they balk when I till them I use Ubuntu Linux.

"We don't support Linux" they tell me.

"Yeah, well Linux supports you." I think outloud.

The result is that they want to pass me off to advanced tech support, usually at about $150 a shot. This is the only reason I keep Windows on a partition on my computer. :D

This is just another reason I don't buy windows computers any more.

PaulInBHC
September 7th, 2012, 03:37 AM
One thing that I have noticed with games and now I see it here. When something is free, it is easier to give up and move on. When you pay for a game or OS and something goes wrong, the person will stick with it until they get it resolved.

irv
September 8th, 2012, 03:57 PM
One thing that I have noticed with games and now I see it here. When something is free, it is easier to give up and move on. When you pay for a game or OS and something goes wrong, the person will stick with it until they get it resolved.

Now I am not a gamer, but I have some commercial windows games that are nice game. All I use is Ubuntu Linux now, but I do have one older desktop that is running XP so when my grandkids come over they can play them. It is no different than having a game machine. (By the way I picked up this old desktop for 25 cents at a yard sale.) I got my quarter's worth out of it.
The point being, yes I paid for the games, but that is not forcing me to use windows which I paid for also, but I chose to use Ubuntu because it is a much better OS. (Open source is all about choice.)

Sonoran Desert Rat
September 11th, 2012, 06:08 AM
I just been wondering what other users have found that windows is able to do that linux (more specifically ubuntu) cant do...

so far the only thing i have found that i cant do anymore is gaming and a few online videos dont work sometimes

also, add anything to the list that makes one better or worse than the other, such as linux being practically virus free

Don't know if this has been mentioned yet, but, I would love to see a good CAD program in Linux! I found one but it wasn't quite on the same level in some ways (don't remember the name)...that was also about 10 years ago so I don't have an updated opinion either. ;)

krishna.988
September 11th, 2012, 09:46 AM
Don't know if this has been mentioned yet, but, I would love to see a good CAD program in Linux! I found one but it wasn't quite on the same level in some ways (don't remember the name)...that was also about 10 years ago so I don't have an updated opinion either. ;)


Take a look here:

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UbuntuEngineering

Sonoran Desert Rat
September 11th, 2012, 06:19 PM
Take a look here:

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UbuntuEngineering

That's awesome! Thanks! :D

leunam12
September 15th, 2012, 12:32 PM
In Windows you can select a bunch of MP3's and right click one of them and then go to "properties" and change the tag information for all of them in one shot. I miss that functionality in Windows.

I also miss the ability that windows has of being able to do basic file managing from dialog boxes. Or the ability to launch "program B" from program A's "Open File" dialog. Big time savers.