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Vorian
December 17th, 2006, 03:35 PM
*Join in the planning Wednesday Nights 8p #ubuntu-ohio*

I wanted to see who would be interested in a state-wide install fest in March. I think we could have simultaneous events in Cleveland, Columbus, and Cincinnati.

Lets start planning now, and make this a huge event!

rrittenhouse
December 17th, 2006, 08:51 PM
That would be awesome! Even though I wouldnt be able to make it to Cleveland... (2.5 hours north of me). I wonder if anyone would be attending from my area (New Philadelphia, Dover area). Its a drive but since i dont drive its a lot harder to get to these fests...

I think its a super idea and it should be organized if there is enough interest to do so... i've hosted one installfest with my LUG I was president of back in Zanesville, Ohio. (It fell apart about the time I moved)

~Robert

tux72
December 20th, 2006, 12:00 PM
Greetings,

This is my first post here. I just wanted everybody to know that I'm new. If you would be able to add Toledo to your list of locations, I might be able to help organize it. I live in one of the Toledo suburbs. Any of the other Toledo people want to throw their hats into the ring?

Thanks,

Vorian
December 20th, 2006, 12:11 PM
Greetings,

This is my first post here. I just wanted everybody to know that I'm new. If you would be able to add Toledo to your list of locations, I might be able to help organize it. I live in one of the Toledo suburbs. Any of the other Toledo people want to throw their hats into the ring?

Thanks,

That would be great! We also have added a location in Mansfield Headed up by Micheal K.

tux72
December 21st, 2006, 04:23 PM
That would be great! We also have added a location in Mansfield Headed up by Micheal K.

I don't have the first idea about how to organize one of these things, so I'd need a lot of help from some other Toledo people and others here who have organized one before. I'm married, so I don't have a lot of time to put into it per week, but I'll do what I can. Any assistance in understanding how this works would be greatly appreciated. I could probably get some help from TALUG - the Toledo Area Linux User's Group (www.talug.org)

Vorian
December 22nd, 2006, 04:16 AM
Here's a guide from the wiki... https://wiki.ubuntu.com/LoCoRunningInstallfests


In order to reach the most people, fests should be held on both weekends and weekdays. The time of day is not as important as the duration of the fest, which should be 6 to 10 hours. Here is why:
some people will not be able to arrive when the fest starts
it takes time to get systems moved in, connected, disconnected and moved out of the working area
making sub-systems like sound, printers and other peripherals function properly sometimes takes as long as a Linux installation
some people want to get some life out of older CPUs but OS installation takes longer on slower machines Make sure that the place where your installfest will be held has:
Strong tables
Each table may have to hold multiple monitors and computers.Toilets
Chairs
People will want to sit down since they will be at the fest for several hours.Internet access
Some people will want to know that they can access the Internet from their computer. Some people will need to download drivers or other software. A lot of helpful information is available on the Net. There is a list of Web sites at the end of this document.an address that is easy to find
A map and simple directions will help.Telephone connection
A normal line, not through a PBX, not digital, just POTS will be useful for testing modems.An easy way to get hardware in and out
How will people bring their hardware from their cars to the installation room? Are carts and elevators available?Sufficient power
Try to make sure that you have enough power for the number of computers that you expect people to bring. You do not want people to suddenly lose power because one person too many turned on his or her computer.(Note: In Brazil we use No Breaks and stabilizers to stop power cuts damaging equipment)
How much power does a computer need? Laptops need about 0.5 amps. For a desktop/tower/workstation type of computer the amount of power needed depends on the monitor, number of disk drives, etc. Basically though, if everything is connected to one power strip, then they need at most 3 to 4 amps at the moment that the power is turned on and 1.5 to 2 amps while they are running.
You should try to have access to the circuit breakers either directly or through readily available maintenance staff.If you are lucky you will be able to make arrangements to regularly hold installfests at a few locations that meet your needs. If possible you should hold your fests at a variety of locations such as technical colleges, universities and businesses because Linux is for everyone.
Linux distributions (distros)
Make sure that you will have several copies of the latest versions of a major Linux distribution available on CD (erm,Ubuntu :). Some users will need small/minimal distributions on floppy disks so make sure that those are available.Server
You may want to consider setting up a server for:
DNS
DHCP
mirrors of distributionsYou should provide multiple methods of accessing the distributions on the server:
FTP
rcp
HTTP
CD burning
NFSIn order to conserve disk space you can create a virtual CD-ROM jukebox. See Randolph J. Tata's "CDServer-HOWTO" ( https://wiki.ubuntu.com/htdocs/ubuntu/img/u-www.png http://talcon.com/cdserver-howto/ (http://talcon.com/cdserver-howto/)) and Jeremy Impson's article "Build a Virtual CD-ROM Jukebox" ( https://wiki.ubuntu.com/htdocs/ubuntu/img/u-www.png http://www.linuxjournal.com/article.php?sid=5639 (http://www.linuxjournal.com/article.php?sid=5639) ) for more information.
You may want to make some of the following items available: scratch paper, ball-point pens, sharpies, scissors, stapler, duct tape, packing tape, blank FAT formatted floppy disks (used are fine), blank CD-R media.Advertising
People will need to know:
when and where the installfest will be held
what to expect: soft drinks, pizza
that if they wish to install Ubuntu they should bring every part of their computer system: monitor, keyboard, mouse, speakers, USB devices, power strip. Support people will need all the components to make sure everything is functioning properly.
that they may want to bring blank CD-R media to trade for copies of Ubuntu on CD-R Here are some places to consider advertising:
local computer user Web sites
local news media
local computer retail storesMinimum system requirements
Some people will want to install Linux on very old/slow systems in an attempt to make them usable. This is OK, but there are limitations. You may want to include minimum system requirements in your installfest advertisement so that people do not show up with an old machine, hoping to turn it into a power-house but leave disappointed.Networking equipment
Someone will need to bring network switches and cables
You should have a few signs posted to help people find their way around the location and provide other information. Some examples are:
main entrance: So people know that they have found the right location.
reception desk: People will need to find the reception desk from the main entrance.
installation room: People will need to know how to get to the installation from the reception desk.
networking informationFood and beverages
Due to the duration of an installfest you should consider the availability of food and drink.
Pizza usually works out well. Tell people that you will be collecting a specific amount of money at the door for pizza. If they do not want to share some pizza, then they do not need to pay. In order to know who has paid, use an ink stamp to mark their hand. Do not forget paper plates and napkins.
If there are no vending machines at the location you may want to provide soft drinks, including water and possibly coffee during the fest. If you do provide drinks, you should consider selling them at cost.

lfmiller
December 26th, 2006, 01:28 AM
Hey All,


Just thought I would pass this along - DMA (Dayton Area Computer Users Group) Not sure what the M or the A stands for.... anyways, they have a LUG that hosts installfests once or twice a year - here is a link.

http://www.dma.org/linuxsig/Linux-install.shtml

and some of the flyers they use to advertise can be found here.
http://www.dma.org/linuxsig/files/

Of course they are a general Linux group, so they promote installing linux in general!
I'm not a member of the DMA, so someone might want to contact them and see how there installfest go.

LeRoy

lfmiller
December 26th, 2006, 01:33 AM
I forgot to meantion, Let me know if you need Network Switches or Hubs,
I have a few 12 and 24 port hubs,
I don't have enough Cat 5 thou -
and I may have some other things that could come in handy, external CD burners, zip drives, etc.... (Thou I don't know how useful a zip drive would be any more :D )
So let me know when it comes closer to the date and time, I'll do what I can to help.
Since I'm close to Cincinnati it would be likely that I could help out there.

LeRoy

po0f
December 26th, 2006, 01:55 AM
Wow, I'll show up to the IRC meeting, I'm interested in attending (live 3 hours away from Columbus in Indiana). I think this would be a really cool event. Since I've moved to Indiana, I haven't met a single Linux user (only had one friend back home who used it).

Vorian
December 26th, 2006, 03:02 PM
Wow, I'll show up to the IRC meeting, I'm interested in attending (live 3 hours away from Columbus in Indiana). I think this would be a really cool event. Since I've moved to Indiana, I haven't met a single Linux user (only had one friend back home who used it).

Great, we'll see you there!

po0f
December 26th, 2006, 10:00 PM
Vorian,

Just to clarify: #ubuntu-ohio on Freenode, right?

Vorian
December 26th, 2006, 10:13 PM
Vorian,

Just to clarify: #ubuntu-ohio on Freenode, right?

That's the place! There are usually a few of us on, you are welcome to join in anytime:D

Vorian
December 28th, 2006, 05:33 PM
Copied from the mailing list:

Dan Buch

Hello all!

In response to all this this talk about an installfest, I wanted to
represent the Linux noob demographic in the best way I know how. I've
got some admittedly open-ended questions that I really don't want
answered so much as I'd like to see the resulting discussion produce
some ideas and opinions that might make their way into the global LoCo
Team sphere.

What is the purpose of an Installfest?

How does this goal fit into our mission of fixing Bug #1?

What are the potential downsides of an Installfest, if any?

Is the term "Installfest" too ambiguous? Too daunting to the new
user? Is another, more Ubuntu-like name for the thing in order?

- - - - - - - - - -
# insert closing rant here

Please understand that I'm firmly biased in all of my opinions and
that I have absolutely no interest in promoting the traditionally
clique-y, ubernerd side of Linux any more than is painfully necessary.
I believe that we should be emphasizing the concept of "humanity to
others" in everything that we do, with a further emphasis on "we," as
in "we, the ever-growing and amazingly inclusive Ubuntu Community."

Cheers, y'all
Rantfully yours,
Dan Buch

--
// The Highway to Freedom
// is Now Open for Everyone
//- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
// http://www.ubuntu.com (http://www.ubuntu.com/)

Vorian
December 28th, 2006, 05:35 PM
Scott Merrill wrote


Aloha.

> In response to all this this talk about an installfest, I wanted to
> represent the Linux noob demographic in the best way I know how. I've
> got some admittedly open-ended questions that I really don't want
> answered so much as I'd like to see the resulting discussion produce
> some ideas and opinions that might make their way into the global LoCo
> Team sphere.

I'll provide some answers, from my perspective, in hopes of generating
some discussion (since none has yet started).

> What is the purpose of an Installfest?

The purpose of an InstallFest is to have knowledgeable people on-hand to
help guide new users through the installation and initial configuration
of a GNU/Linux computer. Sometimes oddball hardware can throw a new
user for a loop, and lead to a non-functional computer. Many times
these hardware problems are easily worked around, but if one doesn't
have experience troubleshooting a GNU/Linux system, they're likely to
give up, and dismiss GNU/Linux entirely.

Most people don't want to be computer experts. Computers are still
deeply complicated, unintuitive devices, and require a lot of effort to
master. Most people don't want to exert the effort to master a
computer, and are content to use it sub-optimally in order to get on
with what they want to do. If an expert can help them through the
initial bits (which are sometimes the most challenging), then the user
can get on with using the computer.

After all, how many users install Microsoft Windows? Most systems come
pre-loaded with Microsoft Windows, such that the user never need to do
it. And system restore discs ask very few questions (and certainly none
of the installation routine's questions) before pushing out the virgin
image.

By walking a new user through the installation process, you help
demystify the system, at least a little bit. There's ample time during
the installation to talk about (in layman-friendly language) the
GNU/Linux security model, what a "multi-user multi-tasking" operating
system really is, etc.

> How does this goal fit into our mission of fixing Bug #1?

Many people simply aren't aware of what a GNU/Linux desktop can do.
They hear "Linux" in more and more media outlets, but it's still a
mysterious thing to most folks. By helping people get their hands on
GNU/Linux, and by ensuring that they have a fully functional system, we
increase the likelihood that these people will adopt Free Software in
future decision-making situations.

> What are the potential downsides of an Installfest, if any?

Some oddball hardware simply won't work. Soft modems (so called
"winmodems") can pose special challenges, for example. Some wireless
network cards require special firmware; or video cards require some
jiggery-pokery to work (the Intel chipset in my laptop, for example,
took some modest effort to display anything greater than 1024x768).

Additionally, some people won't have the patience to deal with some of
GNU/Linux's idiosyncracies. _A lot_ of people have grown so used to
Microsoft Windows, and it's set of idiosyncracies, that learning a new
operating system is too taxing to be worth the final outcome (and,
unfortunately, many people poo-poo the final outcome of "free software",
since in many respects most proprietary software is "free enough" for them.)

Folks have learned to live with rebooting a computer to solve a problem.
They're used to the opaque troubleshooting they've learned through
years of exposure to the Windows monoculture, and aren't interested in
the freedoms offered by Free Software.

> Is the term "Installfest" too ambiguous? Too daunting to the new
> user? Is another, more Ubuntu-like name for the thing in order?

In my experience so far, it's a perfectly appropriate word. It
accurately describes the primary activity of the event, and it's not too
alien that laypeople will be left wondering what it's all about.

> Please understand that I'm firmly biased in all of my opinions and
> that I have absolutely no interest in promoting the traditionally
> clique-y, ubernerd side of Linux any more than is painfully necessary.
> I believe that we should be emphasizing the concept of "humanity to
> others" in everything that we do, with a further emphasis on "we," as
> in "we, the ever-growing and amazingly inclusive Ubuntu Community."

The "ubernerd" side of GNU/Linux advocacy has its place. Systems
administrators like to know they can get stuff done, and know the ins
and outs of the systems they manage. GNU/Linux provides vastly more
robust system logging than Microsoft Windows; so one is able to more
precisely diagnose problems. Source code is available, so one is able
to research (or contract someone else to research) specific problems and
their solutions in a depth simply unavailable in proprietary systems.

Home users won't care about any of that, of course. What home users
care about are being able to read emails (complete with photo
attachments from relatives), manage their own collection of digital
photos, perhaps scan some documents, and usually listen to music --
often now involving playlist management with mobile media devices like
iPods.

Home users want to know that their printers will print, and that they
won't need to fuss with output settings every time. They want to be
able to send email, purchase items at Amazon and eBay, and watch the
funny greeting card animations sent by relatives. Instant messaging is
also pretty important.

Most home users are sick and tired of computer viruses and email spam.
We can win them on the former, and are making good strides (on both
platforms) on the latter. GNU/Linux, and its UNIX underpinnings, have a
different fundamental design that makes them more robust against virus
attacks. There's little real need for anti-virus software on a
GNU/Linux computer.

Additionally, the default installation of most GNU/Linux systems
(Ubuntu, certainly) provides users with an assortment of immediately
useful software. Instant messaging, photo management and manipulation,
email and web browsing, plus a full office productivity suite. In my
experience so far, most home users are genuinely pretty satisfied with
what Ubuntu has to offer. And at zero cost, they're at least willing to
listen to the sales pitch...

But it's not perfect. Many users have specific software they want to
use, like Quicken or QuickBooks. There is no decent free software
alternative to these applications. There's a real lack of games on
GNU/Linux, too. And finally, the operating system and all of these free
applications delivered with it have a steep learning curve, and most
home users don't have a GNU/Linux expert they can call. Almost all home
users know someone who's a "Windows whiz", who can help them out of
trouble. At the worst, many people are comfortable shelling out
$50/hour for a "professional" at Best Buy or Microcenter to diagnose and
resolve the problems for them.

It's this last bit, I think, that an InstallFest really works to
address. When you sit side-by-side with an expert to install GNU/Linux,
you're given the opportunity to make a real, personal connection. When
you run into trouble later, you know there are people who can help you.
Hopefully the experts left their phone number, or some means of
contacting them later. And you know that all the other people present
at the InstallFest are likely learning things you don't know, so you can
call some of them to ask for help.

Vorian
December 28th, 2006, 05:36 PM
Dan Wrote


> How does this goal fit into our mission of fixing Bug #1?

Bug #1 can be found here:
https://launchpad.net/distros/ubuntu/+bug/1

Cheers,
Dan
--
// The Highway to FreedomBug #1


Microsoft has a majority market share in the new desktop PC marketplace.
This is a bug, which Ubuntu is designed to fix
Microsoft has a majority market share | Non-free software is holding back innovation in the IT industry, restricting access to IT to a small part of the world's population and limiting the ability of software developers to reach their full potential, globally. This bug is widely evident in the PC industry.
Steps to repeat:
1. Visit a local PC store.
What happens:
2. Observe that a majority of PC's for sale have non-free software pre-installed
3. Observe very few PC's with Ubuntu and free software pre-installed
What should happen:
1. A majority of the PC's for sale should include only free software like Ubuntu
2. Ubuntu should be marketed in a way such that its amazing features and benefits would be apparent and known by all.
3. The system shall become more and more user friendly as time passes.

Vorian
December 28th, 2006, 05:39 PM
Steve wrote:


Hey!
> What is the purpose of an Installfest?

Thanks Scott for that description :)

> How does this goal fit into our mission of fixing Bug #1?

Fizzle had a great Idea at the meeting last night of expo/fair in place
of an all out install fest.
It would give us an opportunity to show off what Ubuntu can do. Can we
install it if someone asks, sure. Should that be the primary objective,
no (at least not on the face)
Linux, Ubuntu is not for everyone. I bet each of us have a completely
different reason for switching to Ubuntu.


> Is another, more Ubuntu-like name for the thing in order?

Ubuntu Fest (feisty Fawn Fest) There is a release in April, maybe that
should be considered as an alternative....


Happy Day
~Steve

Piggah
January 10th, 2007, 10:39 PM
I think this is a great idea. Definitely something that we need to do. I'm glad we're planning so soon.

I would definitely be available to help out with any event in the Columbus/Grove City area...

zerhacke
January 11th, 2007, 12:12 AM
Hey, this is right up my alley.

I head the CamLUG which is all of THREE, PHEAR, THREE users strong. CamLUG, for those that have not heard of it and I'm sure you have not, is the Cambridge, OH LUG. We have a dotcom site that promotes our group and the business I run (into the ground, that) that supports the group. We've had zero news in like four months, but this would be the perfect thing to revitalize the group.

As said previously in the thread by the fellow from New Philly, Eastern Ohio now has no real LUG other than mine, and mine hardly counts as a full fledged LUG.

Initially I thought running an Eastern Ohio Installfest would be well served by the brand new Cambridge library, since they offer free meeting rooms to the public and there's free wireless on campus. Naturally, newly installed systems won't have NDISwrapper or the drivers for it, but I could easily get around that to get net access to wired systems by setting up a gateway wireless-to-wired and running a switch off that to the users.

Either that, or we can run it out of my home, which has 8MBps/2MBps DSL. I'd have to worry about electrical capacity if I did that but I think the bonus of not having to lug my systems out and about would offset that. It's not like there's going to be sudden massive interest in the OS around here that would cause me to need to upgrade my electrical panel.

Give me a couple days to talk to my wife and friends and CamLUG members and see what they think. If all goes well, we can have an Eastern Ohio Installfest too.