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Eproxus
April 28th, 2005, 01:01 PM
Introduction
This guide will tell you how to get a nice background image while in Grub. The guide will first explain how to load an image into Grub and use it as a background and then, for those of you who are interested, how to create such an image in Gimp.

Beware! Do only do this if you feel that you know what you're doing! It may mess up your boot loading if you are careless. (Thanks to jonny for pointing this out, together with backing up). That said, it shouldn't be too hard to follow this anyway.

Table of Contents
Example Image
Configuring Grub



Adding an image
Editing the grub configuration
Seeing your results
Troubleshooting

Making your own splash image


New file
Create the art
Reduce colors
Save and compress
Conclusion
Links

Example Image
I have attached the splash image I'm using (and a thumbnail of it). We will be using this in the guide but you can use any image you want (assuming it is in the boot splash format, see Making your own splash image below). More images can be found in the Links section.

Get the splash image here (http://ubuntuforums.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=964&stc=1).

Configuring Grub
1. Adding an image
First, move the image to the grub folder (assuming the current dir is your home folder and this is were you downloaded the image).

sudo mkdir /boot/grub/images
sudo mv usplash.xpm.gz /boot/grub/images
2. Editing the Grub configuration
Backup!

sudo cp /boot/grub/menu.lst /boot/grub/menu.lst.old
Then open the grub config file menu.lst:

sudo gedit /boot/grub/menu.lst
Locate a appropriate place to add the image, find the following (row 24 or therabout):

# Pretty colours
#color cyan/blue white/blue
And add a new section below the above lines:

## Splash image!
splashimage (hdX,Y)/boot/grub/images/usplash.xpm.gz
Important! You MUST replace X and Y with the proper numbers. Grub's configuration syntax is a bit weird because it does not have the same offset as the usual mount for example. X in this case is the actual disk drive and Y is the partition. Assuming you have a pretty standard installation of Ubuntu you could find this information further down in menu.lst. Locate the section which matches the entry you normally boot from:

## ## End Default Options ##

title Ubuntu, kernel 2.?.??-?-??
root (hdX,Y)
There you can find the proper numbers to use for your splashimage command.
Enter those in the line added before. Save the file.
Important2! If you have a separate boot partition you have to remove the /boot in the path, this is because the root of the boot partition is mounted in /boot on your other partition. Resulting in this section instead:

## Splash image! (On separate partition)
splashimage (hdX,Y)/grub/images/usplash.xpm.gz
3. Seeing your results
Reboot and your splash image should be visible as the Grub background.
4. Troubleshooting
If the image somehow does not load Grub will behave weird, although if you have a timeout (Ubuntu has by default) Grub should boot Ubuntu anyway. Then you should be able to correct the problem. More information and tips & tricks available here (http://ruslug.rutgers.edu/%7Emcgrof/grub-images/).

Making your own splash image
Here's how you make your own image, I will not tell you how to use the Gimp as there are plenty of other tutorials on that, use google. ;)
1. New file
There are some restrictions on the image, it must be 640x480 pixels large and only contain 14 colors.
2. Create the art
Uh, use your artistic talents and produce wicked art! If you want a photo or something just past it in and resize it. If you want to do something Ubuntu specific this page (http://www.ubuntulinux.org/wiki/UbuntuArtwork) might be of interest. If you want to use the Ubuntu logo in SVG format (vector graphics) there is a Gimp SVG plugin available in apt-get.
3. Reduce colors
The next step is to reduce the amount of colors to 14. Go Image->Mode->Indexed... and select Generate optimum palette, set the maximum number of colors to 14 and chose a dithering algorithm that looks good. Normal gives the most coherent colored areas but the Floyd-Steinberg algorithms are more appropriate for images with many colors.
4. Save and compress
Save the image as an XPM image. You might want to save a Gimp image also (XCF) in case you want to change it. Then compress it with gzip and copy it to the Grub folder:

gzip image.xpm
sudo cp image.xpm.gz /boot/grub/images

Conclusion
You should now have a nice background in Grub, and perhaps even your own creation! \\:D/

Links
Grub Splash Image Documentation (http://ruslug.rutgers.edu/%7Emcgrof/grub-images/)
Ubuntu Artwork Resources (http://www.ubuntulinux.org/wiki/UbuntuArtwork)
Additional Ubuntu Splash Screens (http://sleepybuddha.sl.funpic.de/ubuntu/)

Comments and suggestions welcome!


EDIT: Backing up and precautions added. Thanks jonny.
EDIT2: Separate boot partitions handled. Thakns todw1fd.

bored2k
April 28th, 2005, 01:52 PM
Nice. You could get some other nice grub images here (http://bored2k.cjb.net/)

panickedthumb
April 28th, 2005, 01:55 PM
That first attachment link is a dead link, just FYI

bored2k
April 28th, 2005, 01:56 PM
That first attachment link is a dead link, just FYI
usplash.xpm.tgz ? I just download it, its just 4k.

panickedthumb
April 28th, 2005, 02:19 PM
usplash.xpm.tgz ? I just download it, its just 4k.
No the first link. The second one gave usplash.xpm.tgz. He's edited the dead link ;)

donar73
April 28th, 2005, 03:03 PM
Thx alot, nice HowTo! :)

jonny
April 28th, 2005, 04:53 PM
Good how-to and very clear. A boot splash certainly adds a bit of a feel good factor when you start up your PC, and I have one myself. All punters should be aware, though, that you can render your system unbootable by being careless with /boot/grub/menu.lst

Things are always recoverable, as you can use your Hoary CD to boot and repair the damaged system. I suggest taking a backup
sudo cp /boot/grub/menu.lst /boot/grub/menu.lst.oldfirst, as recovery is much simpler with a working file to refer to.

Basically, though, if you don't feel comfortable rescuing a system with a broken boot sector, you're not ready for this how to.

Eproxus
April 28th, 2005, 05:29 PM
Good how-to and very clear. A boot splash certainly adds a bit of a feel good factor when you start up your PC, and I have one myself. All punters should be aware, though, that you can render your system unbootable by being careless with /boot/grub/menu.lst

Things are always recoverable, as you can use your Hoary CD to boot and repair the damaged system. I suggest taking a backup
sudo cp /boot/grub/menu.lst /boot/grub/menu.lst.oldfirst, as recovery is much simpler with a working file to refer to.

Basically, though, if you don't feel comfortable rescuing a system with a broken boot sector, you're not ready for this how to.

Thanks for pointing this out! Added it to the guide.

Get
April 28th, 2005, 06:32 PM
Hmm, I only get stripes on the screen :(

kuleali
April 28th, 2005, 06:40 PM
nice

todw1fd
April 28th, 2005, 08:48 PM
Suggested edit for those that have a separate /boot partition. In the instructions where it says:


## Splash image!
splashimage (hdX,Y)/boot/grub/images/usplash.xpm.gz

Since the root of the boot is already /boot, the relative path would be (hdX,Y)/grub/images/usplash.xpm.gz, so the code should look like this.


## Splash image!
splashimage (hdX,Y)/grub/images/usplash.xpm.gz

For those of you that had copied word for word like me and ended up with a garbled screen...

Cheers

Eproxus
April 28th, 2005, 09:42 PM
For those of you that had copied word for word like me and ended up with a garbled screen...

Sorry about that! :roll:

This is now added to the guide. Thanks a lot for pointing that out! I've never done a clean Ubuntu install on a disk, I always partitioned it myself as I have multiboot. Does Ubuntu create a separate boot partition by default?


Hmm, I only get stripes on the screen :(
Stripes as in weird ASCII characters or as in weird bitmap?

You may have selected the wrong device to load the image from. If you know what disk it is in for example fstab you have to exchange hda for hd0, hdb for hd1 etc and partition 1 for partition 0. Grub has a -1 offset compared to the usual way.

thechitowncubs
April 28th, 2005, 11:33 PM
It didn't work for me either...

I just got a loading grub with a weird background in the upper left corner of my screen.

Eproxus
April 29th, 2005, 07:05 AM
It didn't work for me either...

I just got a loading grub with a weird background in the upper left corner of my screen.
How are your disks partitioned? What does your /boot/grub/menu.lst and /etc/fstab look like?

seven
April 29th, 2005, 08:10 AM
I have been using this splash for a few monthes - they rock :)
great guide btw.

Get
April 29th, 2005, 02:55 PM
I used "hd(0,0)/boot/...." but hd(0,0) is boot ](*,)
But now is it sloved :)

dradul
June 1st, 2005, 01:19 AM
Nice how-to, but a bit more complicated than necessary :-)

Debian-based distros have a little utiity script called "update-grub" that will automagically detect and include any file called "splash.xpm.gz". The tip could go like this:



bash-$ sudo cp usplash.xpm.gz /boot/grub

bash-$ cd /boot/grub

bash-$ sudo ln -s usplash.xpm.gz splash.xpm.gz

bash-$ sudo update-grub


Why use a symbolic link? I have several splashscreens and change them whenever I feel like it. BTW, here is a small project for someone with determination: writing a small script that rotates through an splashscreen collection. Hint: use dash, and the @reboot feature of Vixie's cron, see crontab(5) for details ... :-)

On the other hand, if you don't have "update-grub" in your system, you need to do it by hand.

duff
June 1st, 2005, 03:42 AM
<shamless-plug>
Or you could use this nice front end for adding splash images or selection menu colors: http://www.gnomefiles.org/app.php?soft_id=795
</shameless-plug>

Eproxus
June 1st, 2005, 08:29 AM
Great info! This I had no knowledge off, obviously. :-)

pdk001
June 1st, 2005, 09:04 AM
thanks for tip, it's work fine

AnGeLiX
June 1st, 2005, 09:58 AM
You can do this without editing manually the files with grubconf.

#sudo apt-get install grubconf

TheChaos0
June 3rd, 2005, 08:26 PM
Is it possible to change the font in the splash screen? Size, colour, etc?

bored2k
June 3rd, 2005, 08:40 PM
Is it possible to change the font in the splash screen? Size, colour, etc?
For colors you would need grime http://grime.sourceforge.net/#screenshots

picpak
June 24th, 2005, 10:57 PM
The image shows for half a second (with a black background) and then disappears...

Please help :-(

transport
June 25th, 2005, 12:15 AM
How to I can change the color in grub?
uncoment this:
##Pretty colours
##color cyan/blue white/blue

to:
##Pretty colours
color cyan/blue white/blue

doesnt work fine

splashimage works fine, it si nice.

Eproxus
June 26th, 2005, 02:10 AM
The image shows for half a second (with a black background) and then disappears...

Please help :-(

Is the text still there?

picpak
June 26th, 2005, 03:26 AM
Yes...but the background is black, and then it all disappears...

brian g
July 27th, 2005, 03:36 AM
i can't get this to work.
i tried /boot and i got a tiny image in the top left corner
i tried without /boot and i got weird ASCII all over while it was going through the boot process

Eproxus
July 27th, 2005, 08:33 PM
i can't get this to work.
i tried /boot and i got a tiny image in the top left corner
i tried without /boot and i got weird ASCII all over while it was going through the boot process
Did you try with a used image that you know is working?

Please post your grubconf and the image you are using.

brian g
July 28th, 2005, 01:40 AM
Did you try with a used image that you know is working?

Please post your grubconf and the image you are using.i used your usplash as well as one i made myself. both had same results.

menu.lst..

# menu.lst - See: grub(8), info grub, update-grub(8)
# grub-install(8), grub-floppy(8),
# grub-md5-crypt, /usr/share/doc/grub
# and /usr/share/doc/grub-doc/.

## default num
# Set the default entry to the entry number NUM. Numbering starts from 0, and
# the entry number 0 is the default if the command is not used.
#
# You can specify 'saved' instead of a number. In this case, the default entry
# is the entry saved with the command 'savedefault'.
default 0

## timeout sec
# Set a timeout, in SEC seconds, before automatically booting the default entry
# (normally the first entry defined).
timeout 3

## hiddenmenu
# Hides the menu by default (press ESC to see the menu)
hiddenmenu

# Pretty colours
#color cyan/blue white/blue

## Splash image!
splashimage (hd0,0)/boot/grub/images/tux.xpm.gz

## password ['--md5'] passwd
# If used in the first section of a menu file, disable all interactive editing
# control (menu entry editor and command-line) and entries protected by the
# command 'lock'
# e.g. password topsecret
# password --md5 $1$gLhU0/$aW78kHK1QfV3P2b2znUoe/
# password topsecret

#
# examples
#
# title Windows 95/98/NT/2000
# root (hd0,0)
# makeactive
# chainloader +1
#
# title Linux
# root (hd0,1)
# kernel /vmlinuz root=/dev/hda2 ro
#

#
# Put static boot stanzas before and/or after AUTOMAGIC KERNEL LIST

### BEGIN AUTOMAGIC KERNELS LIST
## lines between the AUTOMAGIC KERNELS LIST markers will be modified
## by the debian update-grub script except for the default optons below

## DO NOT UNCOMMENT THEM, Just edit them to your needs

## ## Start Default Options ##
## default kernel options
## default kernel options for automagic boot options
## If you want special options for specifiv kernels use kopt_x_y_z
## where x.y.z is kernel version. Minor versions can be omitted.
## e.g. kopt=root=/dev/hda1 ro
# kopt=root=/dev/hda1 ro

## default grub root device
## e.g. groot=(hd0,0)
# groot=(hd0,0)

## should update-grub create alternative automagic boot options
## e.g. alternative=true
## alternative=false
# alternative=true

## should update-grub lock alternative automagic boot options
## e.g. lockalternative=true
## lockalternative=false
# lockalternative=false

## altoption boot targets option
## multiple altoptions lines are allowed
## e.g. altoptions=(extra menu suffix) extra boot options
## altoptions=(recovery mode) single
# altoptions=(recovery mode) single

## nonaltoption boot targets option
## This option controls options to pass to only the
## primary kernel menu item.
## You can have ONLY one nonaltoptions line
# nonaltoptions=quiet splash

## controls how many kernels should be put into the menu.lst
## only counts the first occurence of a kernel, not the
## alternative kernel options
## e.g. howmany=all
## howmany=7
# howmany=all

## should update-grub create memtest86 boot option
## e.g. memtest86=true
## memtest86=false
# memtest86=true

## ## End Default Options ##

title Ubuntu, kernel 2.6.10-5-386
root (hd0,0)
kernel /boot/vmlinuz-2.6.10-5-386 root=/dev/hda1 ro quiet splash
initrd /boot/initrd.img-2.6.10-5-386
savedefault
boot

title Ubuntu, kernel 2.6.10-5-386 (recovery mode)
root (hd0,0)
kernel /boot/vmlinuz-2.6.10-5-386 root=/dev/hda1 ro single
initrd /boot/initrd.img-2.6.10-5-386
savedefault
boot

title Ubuntu, kernel memtest86+
root (hd0,0)
kernel /boot/memtest86+.bin
savedefault
boot

### END DEBIAN AUTOMAGIC KERNELS LIST

brian g
July 28th, 2005, 04:16 AM
well.. i installed grubconf since my last post.
i unchecked hidden menu and rebooted.
i saw the image for a second +/- with what appeared to be a menu over the top of it.
then it went on to loading the kernal and such normaly with the text scrolling by and whatnot.
is that all this is supposed to do?
I thought it might be more like windows where it shows an image untill the shell loads.

edit-[thank you for the help. after reading the grubconf manual i understand everything much better.]

Tiede
August 12th, 2005, 09:08 PM
well.. i installed grubconf since my last post.
i unchecked hidden menu and rebooted.
i saw the image for a second +/- with what appeared to be a menu over the top of it.
then it went on to loading the kernal and such normaly with the text scrolling by and whatnot.
is that all this is supposed to do?
I thought it might be more like windows where it shows an image untill the shell loads.

edit-[thank you for the help. after reading the grubconf manual i understand everything much better.]
This is what hapenned to me to. It is in the upper left corner for ~0.5 seconds and then it goes right back to loading with tests scrolling down the screen... In my understanding, the splsh image is supposed to hide those messages and stay 'til GDM starts... Why is it not working that way?
I use a Intel Pentium II (Deschutes) computer... Is this relevant?

Cl1mh4224rd
August 13th, 2005, 12:10 PM
The title should probably say "menu backgrounds" instead of "splash images". I have yet to try this, and I'm a Linux newbie, but if what I think is the case, then the former phrase is a bit more intuitive.

The important thing to remember is that this is just a background. As the OP says, "This guide will tell you how to get a nice background image while in Grub." Once you make a choice from the menu, GRUB's done, so no hiding of the initialization text.

brian g
August 23rd, 2005, 06:39 AM
This is what hapenned to me to. It is in the upper left corner for ~0.5 seconds and then it goes right back to loading with tests scrolling down the screen... In my understanding, the splsh image is supposed to hide those messages and stay 'til GDM starts... Why is it not working that way?
I use a Intel Pentium II (Deschutes) computer... Is this relevant?
i believe what we thought this was is what splashy (http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=41709) will do for us.

jerrykenny
August 27th, 2005, 11:51 PM
If anyone gets black n white garbage with Grub splashimages, . . . . . what worked for me was to gunzip the file (xpm or whatever) and tell grub to display the splashimage.xpm (instaead of splashimage.xpm.gz)

I know it shouldnt make any odds, but on my system it DOES ! so worth a try.

towsonu2003
October 11th, 2005, 05:39 PM
Nice. You could get some other nice grub images here (http://bored2k.cjb.net/)

for windows users trying to switch to linux, the above link resulted in the following message from McAfee:
Script executed by iexplore.exe
Exploit-MhtRedir.gen
Script execution blocked

jesseman
October 11th, 2005, 08:38 PM
its how one goes about getting around those nasty popup blockers ... how sad :(

Aliby
December 19th, 2005, 01:53 PM
The first time I installed Kubuntu Breezy I was rather taken by the Usplash screen. So I simply copied it and created what I call the Black-Crystal splash screen I use with Grub.
(I tried moving the logo to the bottom of the screen to see if it looked better with the menu above? :rolleyes: )
It keeps the theme consistant with the rest of the loading process and I think it looks great ;)
Get them here:
http://myweb.absa.co.za/avbaty/kubuntu_black-crystal.tar.gz
http://myweb.absa.co.za/avbaty/kubuntu_black-crystal0.tar.gz

Aliby
December 21st, 2005, 10:02 AM
I have the same question?:confused:
It seems so achieveable, but so far no progress!
Is it to do with default and specific settings?
Looking forward to some response

ronmarley1
April 21st, 2006, 03:33 PM
Nice HowTo!
Thanks

kolesarm
May 4th, 2006, 09:15 PM
worked nicely for me! nice howto.

nolan-
May 9th, 2006, 10:19 AM
Thanks for the howto, worked a treat!

I've just been looking in the repositories and there are now some packages containing splash images for you:-

grub-splashimages
AND
kubuntu-grub-splashimages

The only thing is that if you install them they create a different folder where the images are kept.

So instead of this :-

## Splash image!
splashimage (hdX,Y)/boot/grub/images/usplash.xpm.gz

You must use this :-


## Splash image!
splashimage (hdX,Y)/boot/grub/splashimages/usplash.xpm.gz

Replacing the usplash.xpm.gz with whichever image you choose.

_bgh_
May 12th, 2006, 06:40 PM
Hello,

Congrats on the great HowTo, it works like a charm! I have, however, experienced some strangeness that others might want to be aware of.



And add a new section below the above lines:


## Splash image!
splashimage (hdX,Y)/boot/grub/images/usplash.xpm.gz


This always works assuming the file exists. Out of curiosity, I tried


## Splash Image
splashimage (hdX,Y)/home/user/myimage.xpm.gz

and grub properly displayed my image and a menu. So, I thought, "Great! I can put my images wherever I want and grub will load them!" I then placed my image in a different directory, for neatness, and changed my path in 'menu.lst' to


## Splash Image
splashimage (hdX,Y)/home/user/themes/splashscreens/grub/myimage.xpm.gz

and rebooted only to see a solid black screen with a useable grub menu. Then I hit 'c' to go to the command line and typed


splashimage (hdX,Y)/home/user/themes/splashscreens/grub/myimage.xpm.gz

and grub loaded my image just fine. My guess is that when grub reads 'menu.lst', the storage for the 'splashimage' value is fixed length and so can't handle long path names.

Moral: You can put your images wherever you want, but if the image doesn't load then your pathname is probably too long.

Cheers.

eggmanpete
May 13th, 2006, 10:59 AM
Worked well for me, although the low refresh rate on my CRT makes it look iffy.
Anyone have any links to grub splash images? Thanks

CrashOverKill
May 14th, 2006, 10:48 PM
Went Flawless
Nice howto
here is the one I am using

lilmienboy
December 25th, 2006, 05:28 AM
cheng@cheng-laptop:~$ sudo mkdir /boot/grub/images
mkdir: cannot create directory `/boot/grub/images': File exists
cheng@cheng-laptop:~$ sudo mv usplash.xpm.gz /boot/grub/images
mv: cannot stat `usplash.xpm.gz': No such file or directory

im a newbie, is there a reason why i can't move it over there. i downloaded the file into
my desktop.

Tiede
December 27th, 2006, 04:05 PM
try this instead.

sudo mv ~/Desktop/name_of_downloanded_file.xpm.gz /boot/grub/images/

This should work. As you can see, the reason it didn't work before is because you were asking for a file from the wrong location. Your terminal's default location is your /home folder (represented by the tilde sign). You need to move to your Desktop folder first if you wish to use the command you did, which is what the ~/Desktop added to the command does.

tahsin
May 23rd, 2007, 12:31 PM
hello i want this file to be the grub image
http://www.kde-look.org/content/show.php/Kubuntu+7.04+Grub+Bootscreen?content=56843
i have this file on my desktop (Filename:56843-kubuntu-grub.xpm.gz)
I typed :
sudo mkdir /boot/grub/images
on konsole and

sudo mv 56843-kubuntu-grub..xpm.gz /boot/grub/images

and i get this:

tahsin@tahsin-desktop:~$ sudo mv 56843-kubuntu-grub..xpm.gz /boot/grub/images
mv: cannot stat `56843-kubuntu-grub..xpm.gz': No such file or directory
tahsin@tahsin-desktop:~$

Please help me out ....I'm a newbie so dont knw much.

Eproxus
May 23rd, 2007, 01:13 PM
tahsin@tahsin-desktop:~$ sudo mv 56843-kubuntu-grub..xpm.gz /boot/grub/images
mv: cannot stat `56843-kubuntu-grub..xpm.gz': No such file or directory
tahsin@tahsin-desktop:~$

Please help me out ....I'm a newbie so dont knw much.

Looks like you're standing in your home folder at the moment (/home/tahsin). Your desktop is located in /home/tahsin/Desktop

To go there, type
cd /home/tahsin/Desktop
Then your prompt will look like this (or similar):
tahsin@tahsin-desktop:~/Desktop$

Then your commands will surely work and you will be able to move the image.

Some tips:

Typing only 'cd' will always take you back to your home directory (/home/tahsin)
You can also type 'sudo mv Desktop/your.image.xpm.gz' to move the image
You can type 'pwd' to see which directory you're currently standing in


Hope this helps!

tahsin
May 25th, 2007, 07:12 AM
yup thanks ! i got it working eventually

vaishnavi
October 20th, 2007, 12:05 PM
worked like a charm. Going through all the posts helped me in making the splash image work in a jiffy

Drewbkilla
January 14th, 2008, 07:15 PM
Are all of these mentioned commands the same when using Gutsy?

Not too familiar with the term grub.

Just got all of my effects running perfectly so now looking for the additional tweaks and goodness!

:)

Eproxus
January 15th, 2008, 09:07 AM
Are all of these mentioned commands the same when using Gutsy?
They should be, I don`t think much has changed in the way GRUB does things. However I cannot promise anything since it was a long time I used it.


Not too familiar with the term grub.
GRUB is the boot loader you get when you install Ubuntu. Essentially it is the first program that is executed on your computer (except all the BIOS stuff). This little program lets you choose which other program you want to execute (such as Ubuntu or Windows) and it comes with a nice menu and some customization options.

shane2peru
March 14th, 2008, 07:41 PM
Thanks for th e nice how to! It works for me, however the screen resolution is horrible. Does anyone know how to increase the screen resolution? I tried to make the image 1024x768 and wow, that was a disaster. I know from using others in the past, that it can look really sharp like on Mepis, and I think Fedora too has a very sharp looking grub splash screen. How can I make the image look sharper?

Shane

Eproxus
March 15th, 2008, 12:01 PM
It is not possible to change the resolution of GRUB, since it is used so early in the boot process it doesn't have any advanced graphics. It has to compatible to most hardware.

shane2peru
March 16th, 2008, 02:05 PM
Why is it that Mepis and Fedora have such nice looking grub menu screens? I think those are the two that have the nicest looking grub menu screens and it comes setup that way. Their's certainly look better than mine does. Is there something else they change to make it look so nice?

Shane

EDIT Here is Fedoras screen shot: http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Tours/Fedora7/011_Grub_Menu?action=AttachFile&do=get&target=011_Grub_Menu.png I couldn't find one of Mepis, but I remember it being nice too.

Eproxus
March 17th, 2008, 09:18 AM
No, it's just another image. They've not changed anything else.

Poizhan
March 17th, 2008, 01:25 PM
Very nice thank you, also I suggest commenting out "hiddenmenu" and changing the "timeout" value from 3 to something like 15, so you have the chance to enjoy your new splash :KS

Huss
March 27th, 2008, 07:56 AM
Nice one, giving it a try now.

Huss
March 29th, 2008, 02:46 AM
Got it.

I needed to reduce mine to 640x480 and 14 colours before it would work.

I also used start-up manager to load the image into the grub folder. It was nice and quick, but needed a bit of tweeking. start-up manager resets most of the settings in your grub. In my case, I have mapping errors with default grub settings. For GRUB to find the image I needed to make sure that it was referred to (0,0) rather than the (1,0) that start-up defaulted to.

Thanks for the tute

KingTermite
June 6th, 2008, 04:33 PM
Found out how to do this through a book (Linux Desktop hacks) that I got from the library last night. Did a search and here's a thread on it. I thought this was cool and many people would like to do this, so......


http://www.ci.oswego.or.us/plan/Images/Bump.jpg

sankz
July 20th, 2008, 10:43 AM
The easiest tutorial lies here...
http://fasterthanlight.wordpress.com/2008/07/18/beef-up-your-grub-loader/
and here:
http://fasterthanlight.wordpress.com/2008/07/20/create-your-own-grub-splash-image/

Piraja
September 26th, 2008, 06:21 AM
If you wish, you can use exclusively graphical tools in Ubuntu. Open or create your own image in GIMP, scale it to 640X480 (Image > Scale image...), convert the image to indexed mode and set maximum number of colours to 14 (Image > Mode > Indexed... > Generate optimum palette > Maximum number of colours: 14), save the image with the .xpm file extension (File > Save As... > change file extension from xcf or whatever to xpm).

Then open the relevant folder in Nautilus, right-click on your new image.xpm file, choose Create archive... and .gz as the archive extension. Now you have made an archive file that Grub can use: name-of-your-image.xpm.gz. The image must be 640X480, indexed with 14 colours max, and archived in this .xpm.gz format.

Use Alt+F2 > gksudo nautilus in order to create the sub-folder called splashimages in /boot/grub, if it does not exist already. Copy your-image.xpm.gz and paste it into the new folder.

You can use an application called Startup Manager to update the menu.lst file. It automatically creates a backup of the original menu.lst, so it is relatively safe to play around with it. Install Startup Manager (you can find it and some other options by typing "grub" in the "Search" box of Add/Remove Applications, or you can just type "sudo apt-get install startupmanager" in the Terminal). After installation, you can find it under System > Administration.

Now when you launch Startup Manager you can open the Appearance tab, check the "Use background image for bootloader menu" box. In order to add your brand new splash image, choose Manage Bootloader themes..., press Add and choose your file in the /boot/grub/splashimages folder. Close the window. In the Startup Manager > Appearances window, the name of your new splash image file should now appear in the drop-down menu box on the right.

You can close the application now and reboot to see your new Grub splash image in the background when the Grub bootloader screen comes up. In case you have a hidden menu, you must probably press the Esc key to see the bootloader menu. In Startup Manager, you can check Boot options > Show bootloader menu if you want it to be shown without having to press Esc at startup.

Below is an example, a Grub splash image I created for my Intrepid Ibex installation. The sample image is a PNG file, so if you want to use the image or modify it for your own taste, the steps above must be applied. But you can also download the attachment below and save it in your /boot/grub/splashimages folder. The original source photo is by Ian Spare (http://snowslider.net/2008/06/05/zinal-cabane-du-petit-mountet-2/) and used by his permission.

http://www.aijaa.com/img/t/00556/2799086.t.png (http://www.aijaa.com/v.php?i=2799086.png)

It might be a good idea to launch Startup Manager from the terminal (gksudo startupmanager), because you can read a "live report" of what the application does while it's running.

Below's the actual ibex-splash.xpm.gz file. You can download it to a folder of your choice and copy it to your /boot/grub/splashimages folder and it should work if you follow the instructions above.

SamSlater
November 2nd, 2008, 04:42 AM
imagesplash (x,y)/boot/grub/images/splashimage.xpm.gz

didn't work for me. And yes, I had the image in the right folder, and my disk & partition numbers were correct.

After a little playing around I found:

imagesplash=/boot/grub/images/splashimage.xpm.gz

was the only command that worked. I'm on Hardy, duel booting with XP and have my /, /home, and /swap as logical partitions in one extended partition.

Piraja
November 9th, 2008, 06:22 AM
Here's another Grub splash image for Intrepid Ibex. The original photo of a Nubian ibex that I gimped for this one is by David Eppstein (http://www.ics.uci.edu/~eppstein/pix/lazoo/Ibex-m.jpg).

NB: In the sample JPG image the logo is slightly too low, but the placement has been fixed in the actual indexed XPM image (.xpm.gz).

ADDITION, Nov. 26, 2008: See also my Splashy themes etc. (http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=991784) thread.

Piraja
November 24th, 2008, 07:10 AM
I made yet another one... This is GIMPed from a gorgeous source photo titled "Blue Grub", by Wetwater (Creative Commons (http://search.creativecommons.org/?q=blue_grub&sourceid=Mozilla-search)).

Herman
December 8th, 2008, 09:58 AM
:) Piraja,
Thank you for ibex-splash.xpm.gz , I really like that one!
I used 'foreground' and 'background' commands with mine to set the colors of the text and the selection bar.
I have 'gold' for the foreground color and 'dark goldenrod' for the background of my text in the menu.

splashimage (hdx,y)/boot/grub/ibex-splash.xpm.gz
foreground ffd700
background b8860bThe color codes in HTML notation come from any 256 color chart you can find on the web.

Thanks again for the nice splashimages, especially ibex-splash.xpm.gz, nice work!

Regards, Herman :)

Piraja
December 8th, 2008, 11:57 PM
Thanks, Herman,

especially for the nice colour tips — they make a beautiful match.
I decided to add a couple of examples.

My suggestions for the "moon" text colours are picked from the image itself:


splashimage (hd<x,y>)/boot/grub/moon.xpm.gz
foreground f8f3ce
background bdac7d

All of the source images are found over the internet and they are licensed under Creative Commons. Credits for the source photos: On the left: "Silent Night" by Aim and shoot (http://flickr.com/photos/gtstuff/2063351514/). In the middle: Dave Massey (http://www.3dtexture.net/img-golden-sunlight-water-ripples-reflection-texture-254.htm). On the right: Also this one is titled "Silent night" (figure out how that happened!), by *Ijon (http://flickr.com/photos/gtstuff/2063351514/).

These are just examples, of course, in order to encourage you to make your own custom backgrounds. Feel free to download these, if you wish.

Umenzi
December 10th, 2008, 11:34 AM
When I use a splash screen, the entire image is shifted to the left quite a bit. The menu items are still visible, but I can't see the left edge of the containing table.
Before this the table was centered and I could see everything.

How might I solve this? By the way, I currently have to run Ubuntu in low-graphics mode, due to having an incompatible nvidia video card.

Piraja
December 10th, 2008, 11:45 AM
When I use a splash screen, the entire image is shifted to the left quite a bit.
Have you tried the monitor's own adjustment knobs or buttons?
EDITION/ADDITION: I think the same kind of slide-to-the-left phenomenon happened to me when I tried Splashy instead of Usplash, and the simple solution was to use the monitor's own adjustment buttons.

Herman
December 10th, 2008, 07:37 PM
The menu items are still visible, but I can't see the left edge of the containing table.
Before this the table was centered and I could see everything.:) I agree with Piraja, the first thing would probably be to try adjusting the monitor.

A second option you may be able to use is GRUB's 'viewport' command.

GRUB's viewport command is for controlling the position and size of the rectangle that the text fits in, inside in the GRUB Menu.
The viewport command is useful if someone has have a nice splashimage but the table in the GRUB menu happens to be in the way of an important part of the picture.
We can use the viewport command to move the table around to some degree in order to improve the appearances and show our splashimage off to best effect.
This command is only available in 'Graphics mode', (when we are using a splashimage command).

The syntax for viewport is the word viewport followed by four numbers, like this,

viewport x0 y0 x1 y1Where:
x0 is a number which sets the left-right positioning for the left side of the rectangle.
In my tests the smallest number I could set for this parameter was 0 and the largest was 11,
y0 is a number which sets the up and down position for the rectangle. a zero entered here makes the rectangle appear as close as possible to the top of the monitor.
The number 6 was the largest number I could get mine to accept, which made the rectangle lower.
x1 is a number which seems to be in the range from 66-80 and sets the width of the rectangle.
y1 is a number which seems to be a number in the range between 16 and 30 in my computer and sets the height for the rectangle.

For some examples, in my computer I found that the following combinations worked,

For a small rectangle in the upper left of the screen.

viewport 0 0 66 16
To get the largest rectangle, and have it in the middle of the screen

viewport 3 3 80 30
For a large rectangle in the lower right of the screen

viewport 11 6 80 30
For a small table in the lower right I wasn't able to find any numbers that could do that, I don't know why not, it just wouldn't work for me.

Your computer may accept different numbers than mine.
You can easily experiment with these commands at GRUB's Command Line Interface (http://users.bigpond.net.au/hermanzone/p15.htm#cli) (CLI) while you are booting up.
Just press 'c' from your GRUB menu for a command line and use the viewport command to change the rectangle as you please, then press 'Esc' to go back to your GRUB menu to see how it looks.
You can do that as many times as you like until you have a combination you are happy with.
Try out all the parameters until you get the viewport (table) where you like it and remember the combination of numbers you like best.
After you boot up you can then add those numbers after your viewport command in your menu.lst file.

:)

Piraja
December 11th, 2008, 11:22 AM
Herman, that's great advice; at least I will try it!

Umenzi
December 12th, 2008, 08:22 AM
Thanks, monitor adjustment was all it needed.

However, I am mystified by a new problem: When I use my custom splash screen, the image appears just fine, but the highlighting no longer shows up, and I have to count my keystrokes to select the right item.

Herman
December 12th, 2008, 09:13 AM
:) Have you tried out the 'foreground' and 'background' commands I suggested in post #67 (http://ubuntuforums.org/showpost.php?p=6329638&postcount=67)?

splashimage (hdx,y)/boot/grub/ibex-splash.xpm.gz
foreground ffd700
background b8860b
The six character html code after the 'foreground' command sets the color of the main upper left faces of all letters and the big text rectangle that has all our operating system titles in it in our GRUB menu.

The html code after the 'background' command sets the colors used in the hilite (selection) bar that we shift up or down with our arrow keys to select an operating system to boot and also the lower-right 'shadowing' for all the letters and the big rectangle around our operating system titles.

Make sure your 'background' is not the same color as your image or you will not be able to see it.

Here are two links with keys to the 256 color code,
Web colors - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://www.google.com.au/url?sa=t&source=web&ct=res&cd=1&url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FWeb_col ors&ei=nBpCSYvQBonOtQPgovWFBA&usg=AFQjCNFwgVHSZLt0AlztFXiK5a7nHvkJzQ&sig2=mlDGUuesmVvIoHsBV0yoWQ)

HTML Color Codes: Hex Color Charts, RGB and Decimal Charts and Tables (http://www.google.com.au/url?sa=t&source=web&ct=res&cd=7&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.random411.com%2Fhtml-color-codes-chart-hex-number-palette-rgb-name-sheet%255Cindex.html&ei=nBpCSYvQBonOtQPgovWFBA&usg=AFQjCNHBRyr3xbOBJJPoH2oje1pcqvfdIQ&sig2=lApQ7xz-KrqLNuYeRKwSvg)

You can also use the color picker tool in GIMP or install 'gcolor2' or 'Agave' to help you find the colors and the corresponding HTML codes. I'm only guessing, maybe that's not what your problem is, but I hope I'm being of some help anyway. :)

Piraja
December 25th, 2008, 08:38 AM
I scanned a cat drawn by my daughter. These are the settings I'm using with these two backgrounds thanks to Herman for tips:


#A splash image for the menu
splashimage=/boot/grub/splashimages/kittengreen.xpm.gz
foreground ffd700
background b8860b

#Viewport
viewport 0 0 66 22

stepram
March 28th, 2009, 12:31 AM
Thanks works a treat.

Just a wee tip I figured out by mistake when editing grub. If you remove the text in "Other Operating systems:" from title as shown below and leave it blank. Grub will hide the other systems names and descriptions until you navigate down to that section of the menu. But very usefully when you use the down arrow to go to that section of the menu it will show these. Good way of removing a Windows boot option from the menu, but retaining the option to use it, should you be forced to.

# This is a divider, added to separate the menu items below from the Debian
# ones.
title
root


StepRam.

Herman
March 28th, 2009, 11:51 AM
:) Thanks for sharing your tip, stepram, I didn't know about that one!
I'm glad you got your splashimage working the way you like too!

@ piraja,
Thank you for sharing and you're welcome :)

yuli_capone
May 18th, 2009, 04:25 PM
this was made by me after a few hours of searching how to change the splash

http://img140.imageshack.us/img140/4754/ubuntudiblack.th.jpg (http://img140.imageshack.us/my.php?image=ubuntudiblack.jpg)

http://www.fileshare.ro/1148608899.24

xeroforhire
May 20th, 2009, 06:47 AM
the "gedit" command doesn't work for me. is it a typo?

Piraja
May 20th, 2009, 06:51 AM
the "gedit" command doesn't work for me. is it a typo?
Gedit is a text editor; maybe you don't have it installed? You can use a text editor of your choice instead of gedit, e.g. nano, leafpad, etc.

xeroforhire
May 20th, 2009, 06:55 AM
thanx i'll try that

xeroforhire
May 20th, 2009, 07:07 AM
Oops!

For the next step:

Code:

## ## End Default Options ##

title Ubuntu, kernel 2.?.??-?-??
root (hdX,Y)

there's no "root".

What do i do now?

gaalaaant
May 22nd, 2009, 11:41 AM
I had the same thing as the guy above, no root. so I just inserted one under 0,2 but uh, nothing happened, GRUB didn't even freak out, every was just normal

Randomperson_1000
May 26th, 2009, 12:52 AM
Same here theres no root in jaunty.

I don't think this works with jaunty

kyle2595
May 31st, 2009, 02:34 AM
I have been wanting to change the Splash Image in Grub for some time now. One of the first steps says: " move the image to the grub folder (assuming the current dir is your home folder and this is were you downloaded the image)." I tried running the command:

sudo mv usplash.xpm.gz /boot/grub/images

Just like it said, but it tells me "cannot stat `usplash.xpm.gz': No such file or directory.
Firefox saves the .xpm.gz file to the desktop. Can any one help?

Piraja
May 31st, 2009, 04:33 AM
Did you change you current directory into ~/Desktop first? A bit like this:


username@nodename:~$ cd Desktop
username@nodename:~$ sudo mv grubsplash.xpm.gz /boot/grub/images

Another way:


sudo mv /home/username/Desktop/grubsplash.xpm.xz /boot/grub/images

"Usplash" is an odd name for a GRUB splash image, by the way, because Usplash is what you see after you boot (by default, it has the Ubuntu logo and the progress bar).

Herman
May 31st, 2009, 04:36 AM
You have a choice of two ways to do the same thing.

One way would be to copy your usplash.xpm.gz file from your desktop to your /home/username directory and then run the same command again.

I would leave off the word 'images' at the end though, I don't know what that's there for.

Another way is to change the file path in the command so it will find your usplash.xpm.gz where it is, on your Desktop.

sudo mv Desktop/usplash.xpm.gz /boot/grub/Regards, Herman :)

EDIT: or Piraja's ways should also work.

shadowbladed
June 2nd, 2009, 12:33 AM
Thanks! ^^

Contra1971
June 13th, 2009, 07:13 AM
i found an easier way

i did this (in your tutorial)




Making your own splash image
Here's how you make your own image, I will not tell you how to use the Gimp as there are plenty of other tutorials on that, use google. :wink:
1. New file
There are some restrictions on the image, it must be 640x480 pixels large and only contain 14 colors.
2. Create the art
Uh, use your artistic talents and produce wicked art! If you want a photo or something just past it in and resize it. If you want to do something Ubuntu specific this page (http://www.ubuntulinux.org/wiki/UbuntuArtwork) might be of interest. If you want to use the Ubuntu logo in SVG format (vector graphics) there is a Gimp SVG plugin available in apt-get.
3. Reduce colors
The next step is to reduce the amount of colors to 14. Go Image->Mode->Indexed... and select Generate optimum palette, set the maximum number of colors to 14 and chose a dithering algorithm that looks good. Normal gives the most coherent colored areas but the Floyd-Steinberg algorithms are more appropriate for images with many colors.
4. Save Save the image as an XPM image.but i didn't do the other stuff in the terminal...
instead i took the lazy approach
i went to Synaptic Package Manager and install "startup manager"

after you install it (automatic) it then gives you a choice as to what pic you wanna use for the grub screen, if you have already created 640x480 14 color .xpm just add it there, no compression needed
i will change it later, but for now it was easy to use as it has just a few colors and no loss is even noticed

remember don't compress it
i am using

Piraja
August 17th, 2009, 10:05 PM
Here's how my grub screen looks like in action (see post #75 in this thread). Did not yet edit menu.lst to change the second instance of "Windows Vista (loader)" to something like "Windows Vista (HP Recovery)", which I guess it must be(?), in order that the kids don't accidentally and unnecessarily boot it. Thanks to Herman for the colour and viewport hints!

P.S. (later): I decided to comment the second "Windows Vista (loader)" so that the HP Recovery partition won't be booted accidentally.

sourchier
October 4th, 2009, 10:04 PM
Jaunty does not have a "root" for grub anymore. I had to add this to my menu.lst.
code:
## Splash image
splashimage=/grub/images/usplash.xpm.gz

I found this out using the startup manager. I hope this helps someone else.

faheyd
December 6th, 2009, 10:26 PM
Jaunty does not have a "root" for grub anymore. I had to add this to my menu.lst.
code:
## Splash image
splashimage=/grub/images/usplash.xpm.gz

I found this out using the startup manager. I hope this helps someone else.


Confirmed. This is what I use after using package manager to install grub images on Ubuntu:

splashimage /grub/splashimages/biosplash.xpm.gz

Now works fine.

After installing images via package manager, do " ls /boot/grub/spl* " for your images.



Oh, and thank you OP for the post!

P.S. after installing some grub images, there are some hiding in /usr/share/images/grub , I've not tried them with grub instead of grub2, but I copied them into the grub/splashimages directory for later use.

memphis85
April 4th, 2010, 04:40 PM
hi ,

i'm new to linux and ubuntu. i found this thread and wanted to test the thing with the splashscreen. my only problem so far is that i can't find the file menu.lst.
I use Ubuntu 10(beta).
Can someone give me a hint?
Thank you very much!

Greets mem

ranch hand
April 4th, 2010, 05:05 PM
Read the link in my sig.

If you had tried the search function you would have found this also;

http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1195275

Which is thee best in depth info you will find.

kyle2595
April 4th, 2010, 08:35 PM
@memphis85:
I have not yet tried Ububtu 10.04, but in 9.10 you can find menu.lst if you go to Places -> Computer -> Filesystem -> boot -> grub. It may be a little different for you because you are running the newer version of Ubuntu. If all else fails, then try to Google it. And remember, always make a backup.
P.S. Welcome to Ubuntu!

Herman
April 4th, 2010, 09:50 PM
:) 9.10 is Ubuntu Karmic Koala and I think almost everyone who is using Karmic would have GRUB2 as their boot loader by default.

If you have Ubuntu 9.10 it's a lot easier to add a splashimage now, we don't need to reduce the quality of the image or make it into an .xpm file anymore.
Grub2 can handle images in the full screen resolution in optimal file formats like .tga .png or .jpg now. You can probably use a digital image right out of your camera.

This thread is still useful for people who still use older versions of Ubuntu and I still think the images we made in this thread have a kind of special appeal, but let's face it, GRUB2 is capable of being made far more beautiful. :)

slvidyasagar
May 30th, 2010, 02:02 PM
Tnx for such a gud HowTo :D
But, I m stuck with a problem: I can't find the MENU.LST file in my /boot/grub directory !!
But still, I m able to boot my system normally, I've a dual boot menu to chose b/w windows 7 and Ubuntu 10.04, and both r booting fine!! ,


Tnx in advance :)

kyle2595
May 30th, 2010, 03:57 PM
There is a great website that I found that shows you how to do many customizations to Grub 2: http://members.iinet.net/~herman546/p20/GRUB2%20Splashimages.html (http://members.iinet.net/%7Eherman546/p20/GRUB2%20Splashimages.html)Ubuntu 10.04 uses Grub 2 instead if Grub 1, in Grub 2 there is no menu.lst.

kyle2595
May 30th, 2010, 04:07 PM
There is a great website that I found that shows you how to do many customizations to Grub 2: http://members.iinet.net/~herman546/p20/GRUB2%20Splashimages.html (http://members.iinet.net/%7Eherman546/p20/GRUB2%20Splashimages.html)Ubuntu 10.04 uses Grub 2 instead if Grub 1, in Grub 2 there is no menu.lst.

psterrett
July 5th, 2010, 03:09 PM
For reasons I don't understand, the original instructions would not work for me with Grub (1.)

However, when I put a symbolic link (splash.xpm.gz) in the grub folder, linked to the image in the /boot/grub/images folder, update-grub found it. :confused: