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ReaderRat
November 13th, 2006, 04:40 AM
Where can I find an open-source (free) Bible study program using the NIV. Or, how can I get the NIV text for BibleWorks (?)(not sure of program name)?

mhancoc7
November 13th, 2006, 09:14 AM
Where can I find an open-source (free) Bible study program using the NIV. Or, how can I get the NIV text for BibleWorks (?)(not sure of program name)?

Well, I am not sure about getting it for BibleWorks. However, you are not going to find a free release of NIV. It is copyrighted and is not released in any format for free. I have seen programs for the Palm pilot that allowed you to "roll your own" Bible. You could then use sites like BibleGateway to create a NIV text. I am not sure if this exists for Linux though. You may want to take a look at the WEB (World English Bible). It seems to be quite nice and very readable.

God Bless, Jereme

migualterus
August 2nd, 2008, 06:36 PM
I do notice, however, that the ESV of 2001 is free on BibleTime software for Ubuntu.

funkydan2
August 4th, 2008, 06:21 AM
I think the 'roll your own' script to get an NIV bible for gnomesword/BibleTime has been taken off the internet - http://karl.kleinpaste.org/sword/

CaptainTux
August 5th, 2008, 04:46 AM
Not anymore. http://karl.kleinpaste.org/sword/scripts/

I do not bother with the NIV anyway. Zondervan Publishing House tends to be overly protective of their intellectual property. I am not sure how they reconcile this with the great commission...but hey...they got money. :)

lisati
August 5th, 2008, 04:48 AM
<aside>I heard on a Focus on the Family broadcast a year or two back how some people aren't happy with where the NIV is going....</aside>
As has been pointed out, getting a "free" NIV for use with Bible-study software is unlikely

Eutaw
August 6th, 2008, 04:45 PM
Search for the Bibleserver toolbar. It lets you read the NIV, TNIV, NIrV, and KJV online. I have it in Firefox.

www.bibleserver.com

pistos
August 8th, 2008, 04:05 AM
You can install eSword and then purchase the NIV module for it.

http://e-sword.net/niv.html

CaptainTux
August 9th, 2008, 05:21 PM
$30???:mad: Yeah....no.

Eutaw
August 10th, 2008, 12:27 AM
$30???:mad: Yeah....no.
Ditto.

cjm5229
August 24th, 2008, 08:30 PM
Think Open Source! In order to be copyrighted You must prove that it is an original work. You can not Copyright the Word of God. The King James has what is called " The Kings Copyright" which would be like Creative Commons or the Gnu license. It is free to all. It is the Word of God and belongs to all.

brambling21
August 25th, 2008, 04:36 AM
Not NIV, but try this:

http://www.berbible.org/

and their NASB, NKJV and ESV Bible modules.

Eutaw
August 26th, 2008, 05:29 PM
Not NIV, but try this:

http://www.berbible.org/

and their NASB, NKJV and ESV Bible modules.

THanks for this link, brambling. I haven't tried it on ubuntu yet, but it worked great in Doze, shouldn't be difficult to add it through Wine. They had one download where you could get all their versions at the same time, about 12 mb. e-Sword is still my no.1, but it's nice to have this as an option.
Rick:KS

Eutaw
August 27th, 2008, 01:29 PM
In ubuntu, right click on icon, choose "Open with Wine Windows Emulator", follow the prompts and accept default location and it came right up. Thanks again!

benthorp
October 6th, 2009, 08:02 AM
Think Open Source! In order to be copyrighted You must prove that it is an original work. You can not Copyright the Word of God. The King James has what is called " The Kings Copyright" which would be like Creative Commons or the Gnu license. It is free to all. It is the Word of God and belongs to all.

Theologically you might be correct; legally you are not. The translation work done on the NIV _is_ "original", and therefore the text can be copyrighted, just as you can copyright, say, a dictionary, which doesn't really contain anything "original".

Theologically, you are wrong to imply that the Kings copyright is the same as GNU license (assuming you mean the GPL) as the GPL allows for changing and derivative work, whereas the Bible should have nothing added, removed or taken away. It's more of a Creative Commons Share-alike, No derivatives, Commercial license.

I understand your objection to copyright on Bibles, but I don't think we can, or should, use this as an excuse to break copyright law. If we think a publishing houses are being overly restrictive, then we should speak to them directly, and not assume that breaking the law is in any way likely to make them ease up on the protection of their interests. You would be better shifting to another translation from a different publisher - hit them in their pocket!

Personally, I've never been a big fan of the NIV anyway; these days I'm on an ESV, which is available via the Sword Project anyway.

sdansmith
October 9th, 2009, 02:28 AM
Hey everyone. Sorry I'm late getting to the conversation. I have been on my ship underway all week and just got back.

I contacted Zondervan a few months ago and asked about this very thing. The contact told me that even though they own the copyright, they didn't do the translating, so they weren't really the people to talk to. Then he told me he would forward my request to the appropriate department.

As you might guess, this is the last I heard on the matter. I'm getting along fine, however, with ESV. Not bad really. :)