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Piggah
July 18th, 2006, 03:17 AM
Hey everyone, I'm stuck with a tough decision on my hands. I really just can't decide on my own, so I'd love some advice. :P

Anyways, here's my situation.

For a while now I've been saving for a new notebook, atm I have $600. I was deadset on getting one, until I was talked out of it and spent a few hundred bucks, leaving me with my current $600. Total mistake, but I can't change that now. The notebook is going to cost anywhere from $900 to $1,100 I'd say.

Now that Core 2 Duo is out, I'm starting to think that instead of getting a new notebook, I should upgrade my computer. If I upgrade my computer, I'll probably have to spend upwards of $1000. It's hard to tell. (New Core 2 Duo, mobo, and video card)

My current specs:
3.2Ghz p4 w/ HT
Radeon X800GT (AGP)
P4-P800E mobo

I don't really have performance issues. The system isnt even a year old. I would have to say it can handle anything I toss at it. It would be more of a "future proofing" of my computer I guess.

As for my notebook, it would be more of a convienence thing. I would love to have a notebook to take with me when I go out for the day, to friend's houses (to show off ubuntu :P), on the few trips I take, and loafing around the house. I'm a high school student, so it's possible that I may need it to take into school for projects, I'm not 100% sure there though.

I would feel as if I were wasting my money upgrading my computer, but then again, Core 2 Duo might be worth it.

I've also had my eye on a system76 notebook for quite some time, and would really love to have one. But once again I don't know if it would be better to upgrade my desktop.

It would also probably be significantly more to upgrade my computer, something my parents could help with some Christmas time.

I really can't decide here. I would love someone advice and input. :P

Thanks a lot. :)

jpkotta
July 18th, 2006, 03:35 AM
Get the notebook. If you're desktop is fine now, why do anything to it? Future proofing is impossible in the world of personal computing. Upgrade when there's a reason. In a year, you'll get the same upgrade for way cheaper.

Iandefor
July 18th, 2006, 03:40 AM
I agree with jpkotta. Mobility is probably more useful than extra power if you don't feel the need for extra power.

RAV TUX
July 18th, 2006, 03:42 AM
Hey everyone, I'm stuck with a tough decision on my hands. I really just can't decide on my own, so I'd love some advice. :P

Anyways, here's my situation.

For a while now I've been saving for a new notebook, atm I have $600. I was deadset on getting one, until I was talked out of it and spent a few hundred bucks, leaving me with my current $600. Total mistake, but I can't change that now. The notebook is going to cost anywhere from $900 to $1,100 I'd say.

Now that Core 2 Duo is out, I'm starting to think that instead of getting a new notebook, I should upgrade my computer. If I upgrade my computer, I'll probably have to spend upwards of $1000. It's hard to tell. (New Core 2 Duo, mobo, and video card)

My current specs:
3.2Ghz p4 w/ HT
Radeon X800GT (AGP)
P4-P800E mobo

I don't really have performance issues. The system isnt even a year old. I would have to say it can handle anything I toss at it. It would be more of a "future proofing" of my computer I guess.

As for my notebook, it would be more of a convienence thing. I would love to have a notebook to take with me when I go out for the day, to friend's houses (to show off ubuntu :P), on the few trips I take, and loafing around the house. I'm a high school student, so it's possible that I may need it to take into school for projects, I'm not 100% sure there though.

I would feel as if I were wasting my money upgrading my computer, but then again, Core 2 Duo might be worth it.

I've also had my eye on a system76 notebook for quite some time, and would really love to have one. But once again I don't know if it would be better to upgrade my desktop.

It would also probably be significantly more to upgrade my computer, something my parents could help with some Christmas time.

I really can't decide here. I would love someone advice and input. :P

Thanks a lot. :)

If you can buy the System76 notbook, email them and ask them if they offer a student discount.

http://img116.imageshack.us/img116/1760/mp3btngazelledn6.jpg (http://imageshack.us)

Piggah
July 18th, 2006, 03:48 AM
thanks for the quick input guys. :)

I'm also thinking ahead and how my desktop upgrade will be cheaper in a year.

I'm pretty set on a notebook now. I'm really liking the Pangolin from system76.

I've also been looking at MacBooks. But I think I'd still rather have a System76. Any input on that would be appreciated too.

Thanks

Skia_42
July 18th, 2006, 04:04 AM
Almost all programs work with the PPC arcitecture, but I have found it harder to get things working on the PPC arcitecture then i386. PPC still doesn't have WINE, and couple of games e.t.c supported. If I were you I'd go with System76 even though the MacBooks are beautifull.

Piggah
July 18th, 2006, 04:07 AM
The macbooks are x86 now, aren't they?

The macbook i want is $1100, and a similar build from system76 is $1400.

So as much as I'd love to have an ubuntu pre-installed... that price difference is a lot. Especially to me.

Iandefor
July 18th, 2006, 04:23 AM
Macbooks are, in fact, x86 now, yes. The problem with getting them running is that they don't have a BIOS, so grub on the MBR is out. You have to do some fiddling with Boot Camp to get it working.

Piggah
July 18th, 2006, 04:50 AM
I can't imagine it would be too difficult to get ubuntu running on it. I recall the sales rep stating it was possible to run Linux through bootcamp pretty easily also. I don't know how dependable he was though.

I've checked out the MacBooks, and from what I can tell, the $1,099 model would be best for my budget. I don't know if it's worth the extra $200 for a super drive and 2GHz Core Duo.

RAV TUX
July 18th, 2006, 04:53 AM
I can't imagine it would be too difficult to get ubuntu running on it. I recall the sales rep stating it was possible to run Linux through bootcamp pretty easily also. I don't know how dependable he was though.

I've checked out the MacBooks, and from what I can tell, the $1,099 model would be best for my budget. I don't know if it's worth the extra $200 for a super drive and 2GHz Core Duo.

once you go dual-core you'll never go back, it's like comparing dial-up to DSL/Broadband.

pick up the book Ubuntu Hacks by O'Reilly there is a chapter in there how to get Ubuntu running on Apple.

you don't need bootcamp.

I have the book if you want me to post a directive.

prizrak
July 18th, 2006, 04:53 AM
Go for a laptop, definetly a better choice. I run both a laptop and a desktop and more often then not I find myself not turning the desktop on for weeks.
If you can't spring for a System76 laptop, which I can understand they offer good systems but they don't get bulk pricing try to look for some machines in your price range www.newegg.com, www.zipzoomfly.com, www.tigerdirect.com are good places to look for laptops. After you got some candidates look around the web to see if they support Ubuntu and/or ask on the forums chances are someone either has one or knows someone who has. If you get a laptop from a store play with the LiveCD just to make sure. You can also somewhat predict if something will work with Ubuntu by the specs. Just about anything Intel should be fine.

Best of luck to you, hope my answer was useful and I apologize if I told you something you already know.

codejunkie
July 18th, 2006, 04:55 AM
I can't imagine it would be too difficult to get ubuntu running on it. I recall the sales rep stating it was possible to run Linux through bootcamp pretty easily also. I don't know how dependable he was though.

I've checked out the MacBooks, and from what I can tell, the $1,099 model would be best for my budget. I don't know if it's worth the extra $200 for a super drive and 2GHz Core Duo.

make sure you spring for the apple care warranty with the macbook, first generation apple products can be troublesome, and a lot of people are already complaning about heat issues with the macbook and macbook pro's.

Piggah
July 18th, 2006, 05:01 AM
Thanks for the input.


I guess now it's between the $1,099 macbook and $1,299 macbook.

I imagine the cheaper model would be fine, but I really want to be able to write DVDs, I just hate to pay $200 for that.

Also, the Apple care package appears to be $250... that can't be right, can it? That's outrageous...

RAV TUX
July 18th, 2006, 05:12 AM
My wife recently bought a Fujitsu notebook/tablet convertible, we looked at the Macs also.

Heat is an issue with Macs.

There were a couple of deal killers for me on the Apple:

1. They offer NO warranty or extended Warranties for protection on the screen, if you drop it and the screen breaks your hosed. I know you'll say I'll never drop it. I witnessed one person who dropped thier Mac, and know of another person who dropped their notebook. I asked at the Mac store if they offered any such plan and he said, "NO".
With the Fujitsu we bought we were able to buy a 3 year warranty for the display:


Fujitsu Extended Service Plans
International Limited Warranty Extension
This plan extends the support and service offered during the original warranty period, including technical support. This plan begins immediately after your original warranty expires. (Not applicable for those products covered under a three-year warranty period, only available in the USA and Canada.)

Executive Mobile Service Planą
Designed specifically for on-the-go mobile professionals or those needing an extra measure of coverage, our Executive Mobile Service is an available upgrade providing on-location repair service within the contiguous United States. After a telephone call, to determine if a dispatch is necessary, a trained technician will be sent directly to your location, providing added convenience, increased system availability and quick repair.

Screen Damage Protection Plan
Accidental damage to a screen is not covered under our International Limited Warranty and the cost to replace a screen could surpass your entire purchase price. Screen Damage Protection offers you the "peace of mind" that screens may be replaced, up to twice during a one-year period. (USA and Canada only)
2. I have serious issues with the Mac and ipods being made in slave-like environments in China which mostly prey on women.(I know most people will blow this off)


Needless to say we bought a Fujitsu (NOT cheap) more expensive then Apple systems(about $200 on average), I know they run Ubuntu 6.06 easily because I loaded a dual-boot on a friends notebook/tablet. Fujitsu notebooks are made in Japan not China.

3. My wife who the notebook is for, has used the Mac book at her University and found it has too many incompatibilties to be a practical option, I have a friend who is a Apple fanboy and even he admitted to these shortfalls(also in college).

codejunkie
July 18th, 2006, 05:14 AM
Thanks for the input.


I guess now it's between the $1,099 macbook and $1,299 macbook.

I imagine the cheaper model would be fine, but I really want to be able to write DVDs, I just hate to pay $200 for that.

Also, the Apple care package appears to be $250... that can't be right, can it? That's outrageous...
yep it's 249 but apple is usually pretty good about fixing there hardware if it's under the apple care warranty. but if it's broke and not under warranty you'll pay bigtime for them to repair it.

Piggah
July 18th, 2006, 05:16 AM
Protection plans with the macbooks is worrying me quite a bit. I don't want to give my other arm and leg for coverage.

I really just can't afford a Fujitsu. I looked at them, and they're nice, but out of my range.

Also, I really think I'd like OS X. iLife does look nice... Please do comment on OS X, because it's a major deciding factor right now.

GuitarHero
July 18th, 2006, 05:17 AM
I would get a laptop without an OS on it and put ubuntu on it. You're going to be saving the most money that way.

RAV TUX
July 18th, 2006, 05:24 AM
yep it's 249 but apple is usually pretty good about fixing there hardware if it's under the apple care warranty. but if it's broke and not under warranty you'll pay bigtime for them to repair it.

that isn't a bad price for a warranty plan.

Select the plan for your Mac:

http://images.apple.com/main/elements/arrowa1a5a9.gif Mac mini (http://store.apple.com/1-800-MY-APPLE/WebObjects/initial.woa/wa/browse?ptm=WXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX502901&lprd=http://store.apple.com/1-800-MY-APPLE/WebObjects/AppleStore?productLearnMore=M9859LL/B) $149.00 http://images.apple.com/main/elements/arrowa1a5a9.gif iMac/eMac (http://store.apple.com/1-800-MY-APPLE/WebObjects/initial.woa/wa/browse?ptm=WXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX502901&lprd=http://store.apple.com/1-800-MY-APPLE/WebObjects/AppleStore?productLearnMore=M8851LL/B) $169.00 http://images.apple.com/main/elements/arrowa1a5a9.gif MacBook/iBook (http://store.apple.com/1-800-MY-APPLE/WebObjects/initial.woa/wa/browse?ptm=WXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX502901&lprd=http://store.apple.com/1-800-MY-APPLE/WebObjects/AppleStore?productLearnMore=M8852LL/B) $249.00 http://images.apple.com/main/elements/arrowa1a5a9.gif Power Mac (http://store.apple.com/1-800-MY-APPLE/WebObjects/initial.woa/wa/browse?ptm=WXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX502901&lprd=http://store.apple.com/1-800-MY-APPLE/WebObjects/AppleStore?productLearnMore=M8850LL/B) $249.00 http://images.apple.com/main/elements/arrowa1a5a9.gif MacBook Pro/PowerBook (http://store.apple.com/1-800-MY-APPLE/WebObjects/initial.woa/wa/browse?ptm=WXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX502901&lprd=http://store.apple.com/1-800-MY-APPLE/WebObjects/AppleStore?productLearnMore=M8853LL/B) $349.00 http://images.apple.com/main/elements/arrowa1a5a9.gif Apple Display (http://store.apple.com/1-800-MY-APPLE/WebObjects/initial.woa/wa/browse?ptm=WXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX502901&lprd=http://store.apple.com/1-800-MY-APPLE/WebObjects/AppleStore?productLearnMore=MA358LL/A) $99.00

This most be new they are offering Apple Display warranty:


AppleCare Protection Plan for Apple Display

AppleCare Protection Plan extends your Apple display's 90 days of complimentary support and one-year warranty to up to three years of world-class support.
Price: $99.00

Get peace of mind from Apple
Every Apple display comes with 90 days of complimentary telephone support and one year of hardware service coverage from the date of purchase. The AppleCare Protection Plan for Apple Display extends the service and support coverage for your display and its included accessories to three years from the display's purchase date.

We recommend that you purchase the AppleCare Protection Plan with your Apple display to take maximum advantage of the coverage the plan provides. This comprehensive plan is available for all Apple display models, within their one-year limited warranty.


but it doesn't say if the will replace the screen or what exactly they cover, very vague.

RAV TUX
July 18th, 2006, 05:25 AM
The AppleCare Protection Plan is a uniquely integrated service and support solution that extends the complimentary coverage on your Mac to three years from the computer’s purchase date. This comprehensive plan includes expert telephone assistance, global repair coverage, onsite repairs for desktop computers(1), web-based support resources, and powerful diagnostic tools — all for one economical price. We recommend that you purchase the AppleCare Protection Plan when you purchase your Apple system to take maximum advantage of the coverage the plan provides.

Three years of security
Every Mac comes with 90 days of telephone support and one year of service coverage at an Apple-authorized repair center. By purchasing the AppleCare Protection Plan with your Mac, you can extend your coverage to three years from the computer’s purchase date.

http://images.apple.com/support/products/images/proplan_coverage063006.gif

Comprehensive coverage
The AppleCare Protection Plan covers your Mac, as well as an AirPort Extreme Card, an AirPort Express or AirPort Extreme Base Station, and Apple RAM used with your Mac. Mac mini, Power Mac, MacBook Pro, and PowerBook customers may also register one Apple display for coverage, provided that the Mac and the display are purchased together.

One number to call for help
Get direct telephone access to Apple’s own technical support group, the people who know your system best. Because Apple creates the computer, the operating system, and many built-in applications, the Mac is a truly integrated system. Just one phone call can help resolve most issues with your Mac because AppleCare representatives can help troubleshoot Apple hardware, the Mac operating system, and many Apple consumer applications, including iLife, iWork, iChat AV, Mail, Safari, iCal, iSync, AppleWorks, and QuickTime.

Convenient repair options
The AppleCare Protection Plan ensures that Apple-authorized technicians will perform repairs using genuine Apple parts(5). With this plan, parts and labor will be covered for three years from your computer's purchase date. The plan includes onsite service for desktop computers and global repair coverage, which can be very important if you travel abroad.

(1) Onsite service is not available in all locations.
(2) Access to web-based resources requires the use of a compatible Internet service provider; fees may apply.
(3) Xserve and Mac OS X Server are not supported under the AppleCare Protection Plan.
(4) Local telephone fees may apply. Telephone numbers and hours of operation may vary and are subject to change.
(5) Repair service may include onsite, carry-in, and direct mail-in; specific availability of each option depends on product type and location of Apple Authorized Service Provider. Apple may also request that the customer replace components with readily installable parts.
___________________

Comprehensive service and support
Extends telephone support from 90 days to three years from computer's purchase date
Extends hardware repair coverage to three years from computer's purchase date, including:
Onsite service for desktop computers(1)
Global repair coverage
Provides dedicated access to web-based support resources(2)
Includes powerful diagnostic tools (TechTool Deluxe from Micromat)
Assistance with the complete Apple solution
Apple hardware products(3)
An Apple computer
An Apple mouse and keyboard when included with a covered computer (or purchased with Mac mini)
An Apple display when purchased and registered with a covered Mac mini, Power Mac, MacBook Pro or PowerBook computer
An AirPort Extreme Card, AirPort Express or AirPort Extreme Base Station, and Apple RAM when used with a Mac covered by the AppleCare Protection Plan
The Mac OS(3)
Many Apple-branded consumer applications, including iLife, iWork, iChat AV, Mail, Safari, iCal, iSync, AppleWorks, and QuickTime
Quality and convenience backed by Apple
Award-winning Apple technical support through an easy-to-remember toll-free telephone number(4)
Repairs performed by Apple-authorized technicians using genuine Apple parts(5)
Quick and easy registration____________________

http://images.apple.com/main/elements/small_pdf_icon.gifAppleCare Protection Plan Data Sheet (http://images.apple.com/support/products/pdf/AppleCare_ProPlan_DS20050628.pdf)
Requires Adobe Acrobat Reader (http://www.adobe.com/prodindex/acrobat/readstep.html)

See AppleCare Protection Plan Terms & Conditions (http://images.apple.com/legal/applecare/appna.pdf) for complete product details.

Piggah
July 18th, 2006, 05:29 AM
I guess my question is: Am I going to be looking at prices like that for a warranty on any notebook I get?


I just really can't afford something like... =\

RAV TUX
July 18th, 2006, 05:31 AM
I would get a laptop without an OS on it and put ubuntu on it. You're going to be saving the most money that way.

GuitarHero has a good point here, perhaps you should look into ASUS or something with NO OS,...I would say the consumer fad and sexiness of Apple is alluring but I am not falling for it, but OS X is a nice OS, but I prefer Ubuntu over OS X.

Piggah
July 18th, 2006, 05:33 AM
Correct me here if I'm wrong...

I just see OS X as a way to have better home/mobile entertainment. I've never owned a mac, so I don't know what the media is going to be like.

I know I can accomplish it all with ubuntu, I'm doing it right now, OS X just seems to have more appeal in that department.


If I could find a nice notebook with no OS, that would also be an option.

GuitarHero
July 18th, 2006, 05:43 AM
OSX is all about making everything as simplistic as possible while looking stylish. Not saying that's good or bad, it depends what you want.

Piggah
July 18th, 2006, 05:49 AM
OSX is all about making everything as simplistic as possible while looking stylish. Not saying that's good or bad, it depends what you want.

I can't say I really want simple. I think that would be something that would start to bother me after months of usage. Lack of fun configuration tools and tons of options that is.


Where would be a good place to find a nice ASUS with no OS? I really don't know of anywhere..

RAV TUX
July 18th, 2006, 05:53 AM
go here for a list of vendors who sale pre-installed linux notebooks

http://tuxmobil.org/reseller.html

Piggah
July 18th, 2006, 06:01 AM
it appears I was mistaken earlier...

I can actually get a System76 notebook BETTER than the $1,099 for $1,085.

It looks like I might be getting a System76 afterall...

prizrak
July 18th, 2006, 06:24 AM
Thanks for the input.


I guess now it's between the $1,099 macbook and $1,299 macbook.

I imagine the cheaper model would be fine, but I really want to be able to write DVDs, I just hate to pay $200 for that.

Also, the Apple care package appears to be $250... that can't be right, can it? That's outrageous...

Don't bother with the more expensive model. If you wanna burn DVD's just get a DVD burner for your desktop you should be able to find them fairly cheaply now.
Care package makes huge sense, I got extended warranty for my old Toshiba laptop and it paid for itself many times over. They replaced everything but the CPU and the original touchpad on it.

Piggah
July 18th, 2006, 02:51 PM
Thanks for the input.

After doing more pricing, I'm thinking I'd rather go with a System 76. It looks like I can get a Pangolin that's better, for less.

That's great for me too, because I'm not a fan of Apple for a lot of reasons. They just seemed to be giving me the best deal. I'd prefer to be supporting a company like system 76 rather than Apple.

I think I'll be checking into System 76 a bit more now.

Miguel
July 18th, 2006, 04:43 PM
Hi Piggah,

I think you are right in going for the laptop. Your dekstop is OK unless you want to play Oblivion in maximum settings. And this is windows only. Well, you could also do High Performance Computing (such as computational fluid dynamics or density functional theory) and benefit from Conroe, but in this case you probably have access to a big bad cluster.

But what I wanted to mention is that in the laptop market, a bigger screen is not automatically better. An example is that you don't find 13.3 inch laptops that weigh under 2Kg for less than 1800$. Ultraportables are ultraexpensive. Thin-and-lights depend on the features. The macbook looks like a good deal in the US (I haven't looked at the details)... but weighs as much as a macbook pro (with a 15.4 screen). 15.4 inch laptops are, today, average. And multimedia monsters (17 inches) can also be quite expensive.

I would advise going to a local store and have a look at present laptops. See which size you are comfortable with (don't forget the keyboard!). And remember that the weight matters when you carry the laptop.

BTW: The macbook is probably closer to this System76 laptop:
http://system76.com/product_info.php/cPath/1/products_id/162

Piggah
July 18th, 2006, 04:51 PM
Thanks Miguel, very informative.


Having something ultraportable isn't too big of an issue with me, as I don't travel all that much. A thin-and-light would be preferable, but it's not necessary if I'm going to take a big performance hit.

It looked to me like getting the Pangolin model from System 76 would be a better deal since I would be getting better performance, even if it wouldn't be quite as portable. I also don't really know what to expect out of a Core Duo, so I'm just guessing on what I need.

I certainly want something with decent battery life and something light enough that I wouldn't mind packing it around.

Also, seeing as I already have a desktop for anything that I really need some extra juice for, I think I would benefit more from a thin-and-light. I really just need to be able to run Ubuntu, and the basic tasks that come with that. I'll only periodically need to run heavy applications.

The reason i wanted a macbook was for the media stuff that looked pretty nice and fun to have. There's a lot that appeals to me that iLife has.

With price/performance so close, it's hard to decide between the two right now.

hizaguchi
July 18th, 2006, 05:55 PM
Just to reinforce the general trend of the thread... get a laptop. Having a nice computer anywhere you want to go is much better than having a really fast computer sitting in your bedroom. Besides, laptops are great for the back porch, kitchen, bathroom, and road trips. :)

Piggah
July 18th, 2006, 07:31 PM
Yeah, I'm definitely getting the notebook.

Another reason I think a Macbook would be better is wireless. I'll probably be at quite a few coffee shops and other hotspots, and I don't want to fight with wireless. I would like to be able to just sit down and connect quickly.

I don't know how well network manager works, but I still think I'd do better with the MacBook.

There's just a lot of little stuff about the MacBook that I think would keep me happy.

I may go to an Apple store and check into one more in-depth.

Ptero-4
July 18th, 2006, 07:51 PM
Yeah, I'm definitely getting the notebook.

Another reason I think a Macbook would be better is wireless. I'll probably be at quite a few coffee shops and other hotspots, and I don't want to fight with wireless. I would like to be able to just sit down and connect quickly.

I don't know how well network manager works, but I still think I'd do better with the MacBook.

There's just a lot of little stuff about the MacBook that I think would keep me happy.

I may go to an Apple store and check into one more in-depth.

Piggah. I wholeheartedly recommend you to get the System76 laptop instead of the MacBook. The reasons, simple.

With the System76 laptop you get:
> Ubuntu preinstalled, no need to do complex mods involving use of bootcamp and booting ubuntu off the XP boot menu (which means modding the boot.ini).
> Full hardware/software warranty (for up to 3 yrs) and full support for all flavors of ubuntu.
> The wireless works with ubuntu out of the box, on the MacBook the Airport Extreme wireless is quite linux-hostile.
> No "Treacherous Computing" to fight off or worry about, you'll thank the System76 guys later when the Mactels begin going berserk against linux due to the fact that they have a "Treacherous Computing" chip in them, while S76 laptops run ubuntu with full functionality.

Piggah
July 18th, 2006, 07:59 PM
Well, if I end up getting a MacBook, I'll be using OS X mostly. I may not even bother installing Ubuntu on it if OS X does everything I want.

I think I'll just have more fun with some of the stuff OS X comes with is all. iLife looks appealing to me more than anything. I really like some of the more advanced media tools too. Movie editing and the like looks fun. I also want to start building a better home entertainment system, and I think this would make it a bit easier.

I'm really confused about this.

RAV TUX
July 18th, 2006, 08:29 PM
Well, if I end up getting a MacBook, I'll be using OS X mostly. I may not even bother installing Ubuntu on it if OS X does everything I want.

I think I'll just have more fun with some of the stuff OS X comes with is all. iLife looks appealing to me more than anything. I really like some of the more advanced media tools too. Movie editing and the like looks fun. I also want to start building a better home entertainment system, and I think this would make it a bit easier.

I'm really confused about this.

What ever decision you make will be the right one for you.

good luck.

Piggah
July 18th, 2006, 08:36 PM
Yeah, that's a good way to look at it.

I know I'm going to be happy with whatever I choose. I'm going to do some more specific research on both, and then decide.


Thanks for all your help, I really appreciate it. :)

When I do finally get one in the next few weeks, I'll post my experiences with whichever I get.

prizrak
July 18th, 2006, 10:53 PM
Yeah, I'm definitely getting the notebook.

Another reason I think a Macbook would be better is wireless. I'll probably be at quite a few coffee shops and other hotspots, and I don't want to fight with wireless. I would like to be able to just sit down and connect quickly.

I don't know how well network manager works, but I still think I'd do better with the MacBook.

There's just a lot of little stuff about the MacBook that I think would keep me happy.

I may go to an Apple store and check into one more in-depth.

Network Manager works like a charm, I used it with two different laptops with two completely different wireless cards (one being an Atheros another Intel) and it is the best default wireless manager I have seen to date. Third party Windows applications can be better but the included wireless zero is nowhere near the power :). Generally speaking you should have no problem with an Ubuntu preloaded laptop. OS X is nice to play around with I found it lacking in the power user department and was getting pretty bored with it. Best thing to do is of course to use it and see if you enjoy it :)

Piggah
July 18th, 2006, 11:10 PM
Well, I just don't see myself being in a power user situation with my notebook, whichever I get. It's going to be a thing for convienence and fun.

I had thought there was enough stuff that I could do with OS X to keep from getting bored, but I suppose it could start getting to me in the long run.

I'm just going to have to really check OS X out before I buy one way or the other. I know what I'll be getting with Ubuntu, and that's nothing new.

Omnios
July 18th, 2006, 11:11 PM
Hi I am also currently thinking of getting a used or referbished laptop. Anyways Doing a web search for referbished laptops and the state you live in may give interesting finds. I also checked out referbished on tigerdirect http://www.tigerdirect.com/ . Anyways now the real interesting part, on the 27th intel is comming out with there new chipset which means that there should be huge price drops on laptop processors that are about six months or so. Anyways waiting a few months may allow you to getter a better computer at a better price.

RAV TUX
July 19th, 2006, 01:04 AM
Well, I just don't see myself being in a power user situation with my notebook, whichever I get. It's going to be a thing for convienence and fun.

I had thought there was enough stuff that I could do with OS X to keep from getting bored, but I suppose it could start getting to me in the long run.

I'm just going to have to really check OS X out before I buy one way or the other. I know what I'll be getting with Ubuntu, and that's nothing new.

Hey and when you get bored with OS X you can use virtualization to run Ubuntu on it.:rolleyes:

Miguel
July 19th, 2006, 09:30 AM
Hi again Piggah,

At this point, you have to take the one you feel most comfortable with. I have a friend with a new MacBook and he is happy (former windows user). We have fuscia in these forums pretty happy with a system76. So as long as you get a "normal" unit, it's likely you'll end up pretty happy. But... if you get the MacBook, see if it's possible upgrading to 1Gb RAM (either on the apple store or by yourself or in a normal store if this doesn't void your warranty).


Anyways waiting a few months may allow you to getter a better computer at a better price.

This is not a "may". This is for sure. In notebookreview.com people advise to get the notebook now if you need it.