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Majorix
November 29th, 2012, 06:01 PM
What are some of the better languages released at most 20 years ago?

I am currently looking at D and Ruby. Love them both.

I have some free time on hand so I can investigate some programming languages with modern ideas. Please name the ones you know! Thanks.

TheFu
November 29th, 2012, 06:43 PM
Ruby is over 20 yrs old and I remember reading about D in Dr. Dobbs around 1990 too.
Perhaps s/modern/useful/?

If you aren't familiar with lisp or smalltalk, you may want learn where many of the popular languages came from.

To me there is little difference between Python, Ruby and Perl today. They are all OO, all capable, all have web-dev toolkit environments. I must admit that ruby is my favorite today, but when I need to get work done in the most efficient manner, Perl is the answer for non-compiled languages.

Perhaps looking in to R or some other extremely specialized language would interest you? http://rosettacode.org/ might give some ideas with over 400 different languages represented?

Majorix
November 29th, 2012, 06:54 PM
This wiki about D (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D_(programming_language)) says it appeared in 2001. I am not sure when the talk about it started, but without proper "appearance" I don't consider it "released".

Same goes for Ruby (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruby_(programming_language)) stating it appeared in 1995.

I will check the link you provided now.

lykwydchykyn
November 29th, 2012, 06:56 PM
Lua just barely fits your requirements, being released in '93, but it seems to be getting more popular lately.

How about QML (http://doc.qt.digia.com/qt/qdeclarativeintroduction.html)?

Majorix
November 29th, 2012, 07:12 PM
Lua seems interesting. I have heard of it before, but never really tried studying it. On its "about" page it says that it is developed in Brazil. How come is it open-source then?

I have never heard of QML. Is it a markup language, like HTML is?

The Cog
November 29th, 2012, 07:12 PM
Googles go is an interesting language.
http://golang.org/
I think that multithreading is going to become more and more important, and go's approach makes multithreading easier usual.

Majorix
November 29th, 2012, 08:15 PM
I have looked at Google's Go in the past, and back then there was hardly any material to learn it from, or any community. Now that I check it out after some time, it seems way more mature than it was. Trying to learn it is on my TODO list now :D

lykwydchykyn
November 29th, 2012, 08:21 PM
Lua seems interesting. I have heard of it before, but never really tried studying it. On its "about" page it says that it is developed in Brazil. How come is it open-source then?

I guess because brazilians can use FOSS licenses too? I don't understand the question.


I have never heard of QML. Is it a markup language, like HTML is?
I provided a link that explains everything better than I can.

TheFu
November 29th, 2012, 08:29 PM
Lua seems interesting. I have heard of it before, but never really tried studying it. On its "about" page it says that it is developed in Brazil. How come is it open-source then?

I have never heard of QML. Is it a markup language, like HTML is?

Brazil has a HUGE F/LOSS community. HUGE!

BTW, I was in Istanbul looking for F/LOSS contacts about 3 weeks ago. I only had 9 days there, I'm sorry to say. An old Turkish friend showed me around a few days and provided a few introductions. Amazing country. Amazing people.

Go is very interesting, but multithreaded programming has been around since the 1970s. I wrote some in the 80s for hardware created in the 70s.

With that, I'd also say that newer isn't always better, but it could be a great way to get involved in a community before it becomes overly popular - or becomes forgotten.

Majorix
November 29th, 2012, 08:38 PM
@lykwydchykyn:
I don't know why, but I thought they developed it strictly in their labs. Guess I was wrong :P

@TheFu:
I am not saying newer is better, I just want to see new ideas implemented. Wish I was a bit older, then I could have taken a part in "the making of Ruby". That would be interesting and a lot of fun for me :)
About Istanbul... Well I hate to tell this but there are very few people interested in Open Source here. I feel like there might not be more than 100 people (out of roughly 14M(!) people) who would talk to me about D, Ruby, Lua, etc. :( <-- the true sadface.

Mikeb85
November 30th, 2012, 06:19 PM
I'm still new to programming, but Ruby and Clojure (mostly Ruby though) are very interesting to me. Both are easy to learn, succinct with clean syntax, and you can have develop something useful in a very short time.

Ocaml also seems interesting, and I would love to learn it, but it's hard to find information about, hard to find libraries, and there's lots of code examples on the internet which don't work.

I'll probably stick with Ruby, it has a great community, and lots of easily available learning tools...