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steadi
November 18th, 2012, 02:36 PM
Hello There,

I recently installed lua 5.2.0 on my linux (Ubuntu) laptop and I can confirm this by entering "lua" into the terminal. However, I have been looking around and cannot find the lua.a or lua.dll file.

Where is this file located after lua is installed?

Thanks,
Matt

mlentink
November 18th, 2012, 03:47 PM
Even though i don't know what LUA is, i don't think you'd be able to find a dll on a linux box. "DLL" stands for "Dynamic Link Library" and is a windows thingy.
You can find out where LUA is by typing

which lua
in a terminal window

jerome1232
November 18th, 2012, 03:51 PM
Usually dynamic libraries in Linux end with a .so extension, you can list all files installed by a package with the below code, change the red part to what the actual package name is.


dpkg -L packagename

Wim Sturkenboom
November 18th, 2012, 04:02 PM
sudo updatedb
locate lua

The first command updates a database of files on your computer.
The second command finds anything with lua in that database; you can make that locate lua.dll or locate lua.a

ibjsb4
November 18th, 2012, 04:21 PM
xxx

mlentink
November 18th, 2012, 04:53 PM
sudo updatedb
locate lua

The first command updates a database of files on your computer.
The second command finds anything with lua in that database; you can make that locate lua.dll or locate lua.a

Baie dankie Wim!
Didn't know that, but one learns every day.

Wim Sturkenboom
November 18th, 2012, 07:40 PM
Baie dankie Wim!


In mijn moedertaal: graag gedaan :lol:

deadflowr
November 18th, 2012, 08:05 PM
If I was to guess, the lua.dll is probably in /home/username/.wine folder. Or it's floating around uselessly in some directory.
If you want to run lua in Unix/Linux you should install the linux version.

http://www.lua.org/manual/5.2/readme.html

DLLs as said earlier are windows, which is why I say they are most likely in the wine subfolder or floating around aimlessly.

Wine is a windows compatibility program for unix/linux systems to run windows programs.

The dot in the file name signifies it's a hidden folder/file. You can access it from the terminal by typing ls -a, or from the home folder by typing ctrl+h.