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iamaaron
October 10th, 2012, 09:47 PM
Hello all,

I am a die-hard Windows fan-boy and am thinking about moving from Windows to Ubuntu... There's only one problem. I am a website developer/designer.

So I have to have the following programs:
Adobe Creative Suite 6
Microsoft Office
Developer tools, etc.

How does the above work on Ubuntu?

Thanks,
Aaron!

DuckHook
October 10th, 2012, 10:15 PM
In my experience, self-described die-hard Windows fan-boys don't ever become happy with Linux. I'm not trying to discourage you; just alert you to the realities.

I've been using Windows since the days of 3.0. Linux since 1997. I've seen, implemented and instigated lots of Linux migrations, both gratifyingly successful and painfully unsuccessful.

Notwithstanding what you hear from the camp of the Linux fan-boys, it is not an easy transition. There are fundamental cultural differences between the two OSes; practices that each side takes for granted but that don't even exist on the other side. In fact, there are too many to mention in an absolute beginners' forum. Perhaps a discussion for The Community Cafe forum. As only one example, out of the tools that you cite, only Developer Tools have similar equivalents in the Linux community. Neither ACS nor MO run in Linux. And these are just apps--not even the basic cultural stuff I was referring to.

In my experience, the single biggest determinant for success is the open-mindedness of the person seeking to make the change. Fan-boys rarely qualify. It is possible that you mischaracterize yourself as a fan-boy. If so, then the change is not only possible but auspicious. However, if you are truly a Windows fan-boy, then my best advice is to stick with Windows. Become a Windows guru, which is no small feat, and continue to increase your productivity within the OS that you love.

Linux_junkie
October 10th, 2012, 10:37 PM
If your determined to use those Windows apps then I would suggest that you install Ubuntu (or any of the other Linux distros) alongside Windows. You can then boot in to Windows to use those apps then boot in to Linux to use everything else.

Linux does have its fair share of web site building tools if you want to try them. Or, what I do, is build website using nothing more than scripts (HTML, Javascript, PHP) in a text editor.

LibreOffice is an almost compatible office suite to MS Office. I'd say it was about 95% compatible with all MS Office apps.

But like I said before, install Linux alongside Windows until you feel confident to ditch Windows and go full time with Linux (if your wanting to).

twipley
October 10th, 2012, 11:49 PM
LibreOffice is an almost compatible office suite to MS Office. I'd say it was about 95% compatible with all MS Office apps.
For my part, I have converted to Ubuntu, although I am dependent on virtualization software (read: VirtualBox) for many tasks, such as text-editing documents that I am writing with other people in given groups. Sometimes I just create PDFs out of LibreOffice for maximum compatibility, although oftentimes people want a fully-compatible Office document -- and that has to be performed through a virtualized Windows system.

newb85
October 11th, 2012, 12:16 AM
iamalsoaaron :)

First of all, Linux isn't Windows. Windows isn't Linux.

The responses so far have been great. If you're still interested, definitely leave yourself access to Windows. Dual-boot is probably your best option.

Be prepared for paradigm shifts. You will find Linux alternatives for the programs you're used to, and with a little adjustment you'll get used to them. That's the easy part. The hard part will be training your brain to do certain things the Linux way, rather than the Windows way. For example, many new to Ubuntu have trouble getting past wanting to download packages from a website to install. (Not impossible in Linux, but definitely low on the list of recommended methods.)

The forums are your friend. I would have been back with Windows long ago if it weren't for these forums.

Most importantly, have fun. If you need to, take the transition slowly.

Frogs Hair
October 11th, 2012, 01:04 AM
I dual boot like many others here and using the best tool for the job completely acceptable to me. Spending hours trying to get alternative programs to work is not for me but that doesn't I don't try them.

Take time to get to know the software and don't try to use an Linux alternative when you have a deadline to meet. Time and experimentation will tell if the program will work as an acceptable replacement for your Windows software.

Consider co workers as well if applicable, is an unfamiliar format going to be a problem for those you share information with.

shaktiman1234
October 11th, 2012, 01:54 PM
Those who are very much used to windows and its application will find uncomfortable initially. But you definitely like doing things yourself instead of relying on some software then, linux is for you.

Warprunner
October 11th, 2012, 03:05 PM
Hello all,

I am a die-hard Windows fan-boy and am thinking about moving from Windows to Ubuntu... There's only one problem. I am a website developer/designer.

So I have to have the following programs:
Adobe Creative Suite 6
Microsoft Office
Developer tools, etc.

How does the above work on Ubuntu?

Thanks,
Aaron!

I use Geany for coding. I can't imagine using anything else. I like to program by hand. It keeps all the extra code that isn't needed out. (You know repetitive things WYSIWYG programs do. )

With that said, for imaging I use IrFanView. While I am completely Linux, it is one program I truly love. I run it through Wine.
Ok and another old school program is Image Composer. For collages and manipulations. Understand though that Gimp works just as well if not better. I run Image Composer through Virtual Box.

So what I think you should do is to load up Linux in a dual boot system. Then you have all your regular tools. Then load VirtualBox in Linux and put those tools in a Windows Virtual Box. Get used to programming in there. After that...check all the programs out in Linux that are free and work very well in Linux that could replace what you're using. Try them, compare them. I would bet that you don't use 1/2 the bells and whistles offered in a windows program.

Once you have everything running in Linux and Virtual box, get rid of the partition and go full Linux.

Honestly it took me no less than a year to convert over. You know, though, I never looked back. The speed of everything in Ubuntu makes me faster. The huge amount programs now available is astounding. Plus there are a huge amount that are only Linux.

Warp

OrangeCrate
October 11th, 2012, 04:00 PM
Hello all,

I am a die-hard Windows fan-boy and am thinking about moving from Windows to Ubuntu... There's only one problem. I am a website developer/designer.

So I have to have the following programs:
Adobe Creative Suite 6
Microsoft Office
Developer tools, etc.

How does the above work on Ubuntu?

Thanks,
Aaron!

Please read this before you go any further...

http://linux.oneandoneis2.org/LNW.htm

Mark Phelps
October 11th, 2012, 07:56 PM
Don't know what Office components you use, but some of them simply won't work in Linux, even using Wine and its companion programs.

And, although there are alternatives to Office, and to other Windows apps, they are not the same, don't provide all the same features, and don't work the same way.

Unless you're willing to take on a major learning challenge, you should keep Windows around and use Ubuntu in parallel for a while. If you later become accustomed to using Ubuntu apps, you can always then "move" to Ubuntu.