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ARDV
October 7th, 2012, 07:54 PM
hello
i have 3 partitions on my drive: C-D-E
i've installed ubuntu on D/ubuntu
but now i can't access D files
is there any way to access them from ubuntu?
or i have to install ubuntu lonely in a partition

thanks in advance

raja.genupula
October 7th, 2012, 07:57 PM
Hi

you have to tell us that how you have installed Ubuntu .

have you formatted your select drive >

what type of Ubuntu installation done , General or WUBI type ?

ARDV
October 7th, 2012, 08:09 PM
Hi

you have to tell us that how you have installed Ubuntu .

have you formatted your select drive >

what type of Ubuntu installation done , General or WUBI type ?

no, i didn't format it
i still can access my files from Windows7
i done a normal installation (booted from cd, then rebooted to win7 and installed ubuntu on: D/ubuntu)
now i have the choice between win7 and ubuntu in the booting

dodo3773
October 7th, 2012, 08:34 PM
If I understand this question correctly you want to be able to see files from your windows partition from inside ubuntu. In order to do that just make sure you have the correct drivers installed on the ubuntu side. Look in your software center for something called ntfs-3g or similar. The other way (accessing your ubuntu files from windows) is not really possible last time I checked because there are no ext4 drivers for windows.

NikTh
October 7th, 2012, 08:35 PM
Hi ,

boot in Ubuntu and open a terminal with [Ctrl]+[Alt]+[t] keys combo .

Then copy-paste from here to the terminal bellow commands , one at time and post back here the results*


sudo fdisk -l
sudo parted -l

*put the results between the brackets
Here , so can be readable.

Thanks

Mark Phelps
October 7th, 2012, 08:42 PM
hello
i have 3 partitions on my drive: C-D-E
i've installed ubuntu on D/ubuntu
but now i can't access D files
is there any way to access them from ubuntu?
or i have to install ubuntu lonely in a partition

thanks in advance

This implies you installed from INSIDE Windows -- using something called Wubi.

The files on the "D" partition will be part of the Windows filesystem -- which you access from inside Ubuntu in the "/host" folder.

ARDV
October 8th, 2012, 06:14 AM
Hi ,

boot in Ubuntu and open a terminal with [Ctrl]+[Alt]+[t] keys combo .

Then copy-paste from here to the terminal bellow commands , one at time and post back here the results*


sudo fdisk -l
sudo parted -l

*put the results between the brackets
Here , so can be readable.

Thanks


the problem is that when i enter ubuntu, i can't see D partition, so i can't access files in it
and also i can't access ubuntu files from Windows


fdisk -l


Disk /dev/sda: 750.2 GB, 750156374016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 91201 cylinders, total 1465149168 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x2bd2c32a

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sda1 * 2048 206847 102400 7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
/dev/sda2 206848 215867391 107830272 7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
/dev/sda3 215867392 850745343 317438976 7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
/dev/sda4 850745344 1465145343 307200000 7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT



sudo parted -l

Model: ATA Hitachi HDT72107 (scsi)
Disk /dev/sda: 750GB
Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B
Partition Table: msdos

Number Start End Size Type File system Flags
1 1049kB 106MB 105MB primary ntfs boot
2 106MB 111GB 110GB primary ntfs
3 111GB 436GB 325GB primary ntfs
4 436GB 750GB 315GB primary ntfs


Warning: Unable to open /dev/sr0 read-write (Read-only file system). /dev/sr0
has been opened read-only.
Error: /dev/sr0: unrecognised disk label

NikTh
October 8th, 2012, 06:33 AM
the problem is that when i enter ubuntu, i can't see D partition, so i can't access files in it
and also i can't access ubuntu files from Windows
sudo parted -l

Model: ATA Hitachi HDT72107 (scsi)
Disk /dev/sda: 750GB
Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B
Partition Table: msdos

Number Start End Size Type File system Flags
1 1049kB 106MB 105MB primary ntfs boot
2 106MB 111GB 110GB primary ntfs
3 111GB 436GB 325GB primary ntfs
4 436GB 750GB 315GB primary ntfs

From the results of above command

Mark Phelps has right. You installed Ubuntu via Wubi (from inside Windows). Be aware that this is a Virtual Installation (only for testing proposes).

Follow this


The files on the "D" partition will be part of the Windows filesystem -- which you access from inside Ubuntu in the "/host" folder.

Thanks

DuckHook
October 8th, 2012, 08:12 AM
the problem is that when i enter ubuntu, i can't see D partitionNaming a partition after a letter is a Microsoft DOS/Windows convention that does not exist in Linux. In Linux, everything is either a file or a directory. When the OS identifies a readable partition, it mounts it and creates a directory for it. I am not familiar with WUBI installs so I am out of my league here. However, other responders have pointed to a "/host" directory. You can find the path to this directory with the following command in a console:


find host -type dThe list will likely be long and scroll for a long time. Cut off the list generation with ^C if desired.

newb85
October 8th, 2012, 12:32 PM
no, i didn't format it
i still can access my files from Windows7
i done a normal installation (booted from cd, then rebooted to win7 and installed ubuntu on: D/ubuntu)
now i have the choice between win7 and ubuntu in the booting

FYI, What you described is not a "normal installation". Normal installation is not done from within Windows. What you described is a Wubi installation.

Edit: Oops! Overlooked Mark Phelps' post.

ARDV
October 8th, 2012, 01:47 PM
so i just done a 'Wubi' installation :(
didn't know that.
now how can i go to normal installation? is there any way to 'transform it'?
or i have to install again?

NikTh
October 8th, 2012, 04:04 PM
now how can i go to normal installation? is there any way to 'transform it'?
or i have to install again?

Here is a way to transform it (migrate) : https://help.ubuntu.com/community/MigrateWubi

I never used it , never tested it.

Thanks

ARDV
October 8th, 2012, 05:56 PM
Here is a way to transform it (migrate) : https://help.ubuntu.com/community/MigrateWubi

I never used it , never tested it.

Thanks

do i have to put ubuntu in a pration 'alone' or i can put it in a folder inside a partition? (like: D:\ubuntu)

audiomick
October 8th, 2012, 06:33 PM
do i have to put ubuntu in a pration 'alone' or i can put it in a folder inside a partition? (like: D:\ubuntu)

Ubuntu has to have it's own partition. When you do a full install (as opposed to a Wubi install), you wont see letters as partition names. That is a windows naming practice. Linux systems use sda, sdb and so on for the drives, and the partitions on the drive are numbered. Your first partition on the first drive will be sda1. Existing windows partitions are also referred to by the Linux OS in the same way, so your sda1 may well be the existing windows partition.

Partitions sda1 to sda4 (or sdb, sdc and so on) are either Primary or extended partitions. A logical partition inside an extended partition will be sda5 and upwards if there are more than one.

You can put the entire Linux install on one partition. The directory system starts at / . Further down the tree (or up, if you prefer...) you will have things like /boot , /etc and a number of others. Particularly relevant is the /home folder. That is where your /home/user folder is created (where "user" is the name of the user(s) ). It is in fact possible to put every single folder on it's own partition, but not necessary. It is, however, worth thinking about putting your /home on a separate partition. If you do this, in the event of a re-install you can simply re-mount the old /home partition, thereby retaining your data and config files.

Unlike Windows, which can only be installed to a primary partition, Linux can also be installed on a logical partition.

ARDV
October 8th, 2012, 07:14 PM
Ubuntu has to have it's own partition. When you do a full install (as opposed to a Wubi install), you wont see letters as partition names. That is a windows naming practice. Linux systems use sda, sdb and so on for the drives, and the partitions on the drive are numbered. Your first partition on the first drive will be sda1. Existing windows partitions are also referred to by the Linux OS in the same way, so your sda1 may well be the existing windows partition.

Partitions sda1 to sda4 (or sdb, sdc and so on) are either Primary or extended partitions. A logical partition inside an extended partition will be sda5 and upwards if there are more than one.

You can put the entire Linux install on one partition. The directory system starts at / . Further down the tree (or up, if you prefer...) you will have things like /boot , /etc and a number of others. Particularly relevant is the /home folder. That is where your /home/user folder is created (where "user" is the name of the user(s) ). It is in fact possible to put every single folder on it's own partition, but not necessary. It is, however, worth thinking about putting your /home on a separate partition. If you do this, in the event of a re-install you can simply re-mount the old /home partition, thereby retaining your data and config files.

Unlike Windows, which can only be installed to a primary partition, Linux can also be installed on a logical partition.

Very helpful reply! thanks a lot!
so i'll download ubuntu 10.12 and install it permanently after making a new partition for it

will1982
October 8th, 2012, 07:56 PM
Ubuntu 10.12?

Hopefully you meant 12.10, or 10.10, as 10.12 doesn't exist :P

ARDV
October 8th, 2012, 08:10 PM
Ubuntu 10.12?

Hopefully you meant 12.10, or 10.10, as 10.12 doesn't exist :P

12.10 of course :)
cuz i download 12.04 the last time
and i prefer always using the last versions in everything, even they are beta :)

Edit: is this community better or askubuntu.com?
or there is some differences between theme?

newb85
October 8th, 2012, 10:21 PM
Edit: is this community better or askubuntu.com?
or there is some differences between theme?

That's probably a subjective question, but I would say it depends on the topic. The format of askubuntu.com seems (to me) to lend itself more to questions on casual use--questions that you would expect just one simple answer to address completely.

If you want more in-depth information, come here.

audiomick
October 8th, 2012, 10:22 PM
12.10 of course :)
is this community better or askubuntu.com?
or there is some differences between theme?

I don't know that it would be completely fair to say one or the other is better. That is probably a matter of personal taste as much as anything else. This forum has been around longer, as far as I know. There is a wealth of information here, and some really knowledgeable members. I would suggest keeping an eye on both and seeing which suits you better.