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mamamia88
September 26th, 2012, 07:24 PM
I have an htc inspire 4g. My contract is up. I just put a straight talk sim in it and straight talk seems great for me. My only real complaint is battery. Should i get a new phone with better battery or just put up with carrying a few extra batteries around? Maybe get a nexus 7 and tether my current phone with it?

dniMretsaM
September 26th, 2012, 08:17 PM
If you haven't already, you should look into rooting it. Rooting will remove a lot of bloatware and allow you to manually remove other things that are killing your battery. There is tons of info around the Web about rooting and the benefits and how to achieve certain things (like longer battery life). Google is your friend here.

mamamia88
September 26th, 2012, 08:54 PM
Been rooted since day 1. Running job cm rom

AllRadioisDead
September 26th, 2012, 09:45 PM
Upgrade to the Galaxy Nexus. It's pretty cheap now and can be purchased direct from the Google Play store.

TheMTtakeover
September 26th, 2012, 10:23 PM
Has the battery always been an issue? or are you saying that it is an issue because you have had the phone for a while?

mamamia88
September 27th, 2012, 01:38 AM
Has the battery always been an issue? or are you saying that it is an issue because you have had the phone for a while?

always been an issue. i carry 2 extra batteries in my wallet

mbarland
September 27th, 2012, 09:46 AM
I'll second the Galaxy Nexus. Great phone at a reasonable price.

Statia
September 27th, 2012, 12:18 PM
I'll third the Galaxy Nexus.
No extra layers of **** by manufacturer or carrier, so no need to root. Always among the first to get Android updates. I've been running Jelly Bean since July (IIRC), while the majority of phones hasn't even made it to Ice Cream Sandwich.

kio_http
September 27th, 2012, 01:04 PM
If you haven't already, you should look into rooting it. Rooting will remove a lot of bloatware and allow you to manually remove other things that are killing your battery. There is tons of info around the Web about rooting and the benefits and how to achieve certain things (like longer battery life). Google is your friend here.

By the way I believe you can point out links about rooting as there is nothing illegal in that since Android is open source.

Statia
September 27th, 2012, 02:18 PM
By the way I believe you can point out links about rooting as there is nothing illegal in that since Android is open source.

These two things do not necessarily have to do with each other, depending on your local legislation.

kio_http
September 27th, 2012, 02:51 PM
These two things do not necessarily have to do with each other, depending on your local legislation.

Well I would assume that erasing your device and placing legally obtained firmware on it is as legal as replacing Windows on a laptop with Ubuntu. It might void the warranty though.

Mikeb85
September 27th, 2012, 03:48 PM
By the way I believe you can point out links about rooting as there is nothing illegal in that since Android is open source.

It has nothing to do with Android's licensing.

Various courts have come to verdicts that you're allowed to do whatever you want with something that is YOUR property, ie. hack Windows, Office, your phone, etc..., as long as it is solely for your own use and doesn't involve stealing or breaking any laws. For instance, jailbreaking an iPhone is legal despite all of Apple's complaints.

Android is released under the Apache licence which allows the manufacturers to distribute Android as proprietary software.

kio_http
September 27th, 2012, 04:18 PM
It has nothing to do with Android's licensing.

Various courts have come to verdicts that you're allowed to do whatever you want with something that is YOUR property, ie. hack Windows, Office, your phone, etc..., as long as it is solely for your own use and doesn't involve stealing or breaking any laws. For instance, jailbreaking an iPhone is legal despite all of Apple's complaints.

Android is released under the Apache licence which allows the manufacturers to distribute Android as proprietary software.

Exactly the android version by let say Motorolla may be proprietary but the user can legally replace this proprietary version with a free version compiled from Google's source code. Which is what most of the modded firmwares do.