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Gremlinzzz
September 18th, 2012, 03:48 PM
Robotic co-worker, not long before it becomes Robot workers only.
I,am not anti robot but they don't need sleep or money and there getting cheaper to make.how soon before they make themselves and the human worker becomes obsolete?This one has a face and only cost $22,000.
:popcorn:can he do your job?

http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-19637175

thatguruguy
September 18th, 2012, 03:48 PM
What?

Gremlinzzz
September 18th, 2012, 03:54 PM
What?

:popcorn:link
http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-19637175

thatguruguy
September 18th, 2012, 04:00 PM
Thanks for providing the link.

Since I don't do factory work, this particular robot couldn't do my job.

Vinton90
September 18th, 2012, 04:18 PM
"designed to work safely alongside people.."

The way I see it though, is that it won't happen. We aren't going to end up with a world like Irobot where they do everything for us and we just shuffle around. I'm sure that, years, and years after we're all dead, and our great-great-great-great grand-kids have figured out a way to live comfortably, peacefully, and cheaply, then maybe robots will begin to take over certain aspects of the work force. However, the way I see it (remember I'm not saying you're wrong, this is just my opinion) there will always be people that will need to be employed to fix the robots, program them, replace them when they malfunction, and supervise as they do their jobs.

I read in one of my magazine the other day that there is a scientist who is trying to build, program, and implement a robot that can teach children in their first few developing grades. Why? Because he can, and because he thinks that maybe it will do some good. He doesn't want to replace teacher, and no robot ever could once you reached areas of study that surpass the limitations of a computer. We still control them, and by control I mean, teach.

I can understand your worries, where I work they are beginning to find other ways to dwindle how many people need to actually be at the plant per shift. Lately I've been working ten to twelve hours a day, by myself (I'm a security contractor) trying to cover an enormous amount of ground; while constantly having to run back to the front to check on incoming vehicles (delivery trucks and the like.) So far no one has had a heart attack or a major injury but I worry about it all of the time; they put in all sorts of new alarms and cameras and thought it would help. They do, when they work, which is rarely.

My point being, we may begin to see robots taking over certain jobs, but they are imperfect and they will fail at times. They will have to be shut down at times to cool down, be repaired ect. This will create new jobs because someone is going to have to be paid to maintain all of this machines, and I'm sure they could create specialities so that no one individual can fix the whole machine.

Anyway, those are my thoughts.

drawkcab
September 18th, 2012, 06:26 PM
Well the nice thing is that with the collapse of the environment, the destruction of infrastructure and global depletion of resources industrial society--and therefore robots either manufacturing or being manufactured--becomes nonviable. There's always a silver lining I guess.

forrestcupp
September 18th, 2012, 06:34 PM
This is the start of I, Robot! ;)

I worked with robots a lot in a factory job. I can tell you that we're a long way off from being replaced. One assurance I have of this is that robots crash and alarm out a lot, and they need to be baby sat. Even though they help out a lot, there is still a lot more need than you would expect of human involvement, and there always will be.

juancarlospaco
September 18th, 2012, 07:48 PM
...On the Internet ...no one knows you are a Robot ...

synaptix
September 18th, 2012, 11:21 PM
Skynet gets closer and closer.

Old_Grey_Wolf
September 19th, 2012, 01:19 AM
When I got my undergraduate degree, they were teaching vaccume tubes. I still have a job today; because, I continued to learn new things.

I did analog hardware circuit design, moved to digital hardware circuit design, then assemble language coding, ... relational database design, ... and so forth and so on. I started designing using vellum drafting paper and pencil, then CAD programs came along, then software that helped simplify digital circuit design, then use of commercial off-the-shelf software and OSS, ... and so fourth and so on.

All the time things were changing people were saying that these new things would eliminate jobs; however, that never happened. The only decline in jobs were due to economic recessions.

In my openion, if all you can do is continue to do the same thing the same way and will not continuously learn anything new; then, you have something to worry about.

effenberg0x0
September 19th, 2012, 04:40 AM
I'd love a robotic co-worker. I'd get to be the guy that always has something else going on, gets sick, does stuff wrong, waste time with silly jokes and pranks, spends the day drinking water and coffee, gets drunk at all office parties, has nothing to present to bosses at meetings, etc. And the robotic co-worker would be the guy that covers "for the team". My robotic co-worker would hate me but, in order to keep the environment civil and pleasant, he'd never throw it in my face.

He would whisper to the other workers (robotic or not) by the watercooler: "-You seen what Effenberg did now... dude, the guy is a moron. But hey, he's good people you know, let's cover for him, he needs the job...".

Regards,
Effenberg

forrestcupp
September 19th, 2012, 12:18 PM
I'd love a robotic co-worker. I'd get to be the guy that always has something else going on, gets sick, does stuff wrong, waste time with silly jokes and pranks, spends the day drinking water and coffee, gets drunk at all office parties, has nothing to present to bosses at meetings, etc. And the robotic co-worker would be the guy that covers "for the team". My robotic co-worker would hate me but, in order to keep the environment civil and pleasant, he'd never throw it in my face.

He would whisper to the other workers (robotic or not) by the watercooler: "-You seen what Effenberg did now... dude, the guy is a moron. But hey, he's good people you know, let's cover for him, he needs the job...".

Regards,
Effenberg

I wish that's how it was. :)

In my job, the robot only did things dangerous for humans, like dipping and pouring molten aluminum with a ladle, and picking up parts that were over 1000F. I had to do everything else, which was a lot. There are a lot of things that robots will probably never be able to do.

Grenage
September 19th, 2012, 12:22 PM
not long before it becomes Robot workers only.

If 'not long' vastly surpasses the life span of you and yours, perhaps.

t0p
September 19th, 2012, 12:55 PM
I watched a vid on Youtube the other night (I think it was called "The Hunt for AI"), and there were some swanky robots featured (some people think true AI will arrive only through bodies, not disembodied computer-consciousnesses). There were robots developing their own languages, learning stuff at phenomenal rates, and doing all kinds of tasks - pouring molten metals into molds and pruning roses - with only a quick change of tweezers/manipulators/razor-sharp disembowelling blades.

When I was a kiddie, scientists were saying how robots in the workplace would give us lots of free time to lounge round sipping pina coladas with our children. They never considered the possibility of unemployed masses killing and eating their children, washing the gobs of flesh with not-pina colada.

Evolution, unemployment, Skynet... we're all screwed one way or another...

forrestcupp
September 19th, 2012, 02:05 PM
I watched a vid on Youtube the other night (I think it was called "The Hunt for AI"), and there were some swanky robots featured (some people think true AI will arrive only through bodies, not disembodied computer-consciousnesses). There were robots developing their own languages, learning stuff at phenomenal rates, and doing all kinds of tasks - pouring molten metals into molds and pruning roses - with only a quick change of tweezers/manipulators/razor-sharp disembowelling blades.

When I was a kiddie, scientists were saying how robots in the workplace would give us lots of free time to lounge round sipping pina coladas with our children. They never considered the possibility of unemployed masses killing and eating their children, washing the gobs of flesh with not-pina colada.

Evolution, unemployment, Skynet... we're all screwed one way or another...

Lol. I, Robot is almost here. It's too bad Asimov's laws don't really have to apply.

effenberg0x0
September 19th, 2012, 02:13 PM
Maybe there already are robots among us.
We'll be in Blade Runner in a couple years :)

Regards,
Effenberg

Paqman
September 19th, 2012, 07:32 PM
Lol, predictions of the impending obsolescence of humanity are pretty much uniformly premature. Our lives are much longer and more comfortable than at any time in history, but last time I checked we all still had to earn a crust. Human activity is the basis of our economies, so the idea that automation would allow us to avoid work is a bit silly IMO.

This is an interesting robot though. The idea of being able to integrate it into the same workspace as humans without cages is huge. That means you could have a portable robot able to do repetitive tasks with high accuracy, which would be brilliant for maintenance, modifications, testing, etc. I work on trains, and it would be excellent to get to a place where when a train rolls into a shed for maintenance a robot is automatically dispatched to make it safe and drop any necessary panels for the particular job scheduled, so that when the humans arrived they could get straight to work. Huge man-hours to be saved there, potentially. Right now the amount of work is largely defined by the amount of manpower we have, if you automate some of the drudgery we could get more done.

forrestcupp
September 19th, 2012, 08:55 PM
Lol, predictions of the impending obsolescence of humanity are pretty much uniformly premature. Our lives are much longer and more comfortable than at any time in history, but last time I checked we all still had to earn a crust. Human activity is the basis of our economies, so the idea that automation would allow us to avoid work is a bit silly IMO.

Now is a good time for KiwiNZ's economics lessons. :)

If no one can earn any money, then no one can buy anything, and there will be no need for robots. ;)

mr john
September 21st, 2012, 04:25 AM
I worked in an office where a robot carried packages, paperwork and notes from office to office. It seemed weird, but it kind of made sense.

ikt
September 21st, 2012, 03:20 PM
If no one can earn any money, then no one can buy anything, and there will be no need for robots. ;)

I can't wait!

Bring on the 1 hour working week already!

forrestcupp
September 21st, 2012, 03:47 PM
I worked in an office where a robot carried packages, paperwork and notes from office to office. It seemed weird, but it kind of made sense.That reminds me of those little robots on Star Wars. :)


I can't wait!

Bring on the 1 hour working week already!
You'll be working 1 hour in the work force, and 80 at home trying to grow, can, and freeze your own crops, spin your own wool, and weave your own clothes because you can't afford to buy anything. :D

Gremlinzzz
September 23rd, 2012, 12:33 AM
:popcorn:My Robotic co-worker couldn't come to work today,he came down with a mysterious virus.