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xoScarlettRose
July 9th, 2012, 01:00 PM
):P Hallo there! Totally new to Ubuntu and I was wondering what you more seasoned users had to reccomend as far as applications, games, things to try, upgrades or just advice for the rest of us new people. Already THRILLED with Ubuntu, it makes Windows look like a total joke:lolflag: I would love to hear your advice!!! xoScarlett

kurt18947
July 9th, 2012, 01:28 PM
Hello and welcome. Just trying doing the things you need to do. If you have networking and printing working you're well on your way. If your machine could use proprietary drivers you should have seen a message in the upper right corner of your screen during or soon after installation. Just do the things you need or want to do. Watch videos - flash can be an issue on some systems. If you have problems, I recommend a FireFox add-on, Flash-aid. For office-type stuff here is documentation on Libre Office:

http://www.libreoffice.org/get-help/documentation/

Keep a copy of important files on some form of removable media; you don't want to have your only copy of a 100 page paper get corrupted or lose irreplaceable photos. Above all, have fun!

AlbertJB
July 9th, 2012, 02:30 PM
Welcome to Freedom, xoScarlettRose :)

A nice MS Paint substitute in Ubuntu would be KolourPaint (it's KDE, but runs well under Gnome). Of course if you look something more professional (but more complex) you have the GIMP (Photoshop open source rival).

For games, I'm not a gamer but you have plenty of games in Ubuntu Software Control to choose ;)

For listening to music I recently switched from rhythmbox to clementine, but both are great apps, clementine is newer and IMHO more user friendly.

A good file searcher I've got is catfish, you'll need to search for files in your computer some day.

I'm a newbie too, but I love discovering new things everyday.

Speaking of desktop environments, you must already know there are different graphical interfaces to work with Ubuntu: Unity (which comes by default), Gnome, XFCE.

Cheers!

mastablasta
July 9th, 2012, 02:49 PM
nicely written so i would just add a few things...



A nice MS Paint substitute in Ubuntu would be KolourPaint (it's KDE, but runs well under Gnome). Of course if you look something more professional (but more complex) you have the GIMP (Photoshop open source rival).


There is also Krita (KDE app) which has more funcitons than paint but less than Gimp to make it simpler to use. Another excelent graphics programme is Inkscape that handles vector graphics (think Corel Draw but free).


For games, I'm not a gamer but you have plenty of games in Ubuntu Software Control to choose ;)


Check out playdeb site, add their repository and play a few linux games. But there are more out there though some are hiding quite well. there are also some good commercial ones with very good graphics.




For listening to music I recently switched from rhythmbox to clementine, but both are great apps, clementine is newer and IMHO more user friendly.


if you have a really large music collection the Guayadeque can handle it.


trying out different desktop environemnts is good as you can see the possibilities.

Dragonbite
July 9th, 2012, 03:15 PM
A nice MS Paint substitute in Ubuntu would be KolourPaint (it's KDE, but runs well under Gnome). Of course if you look something more professional (but more complex) you have the GIMP (Photoshop open source rival).

Another, non-KDE, substitute is MyPaint or if you have any experience (or not) with Paint.NET then look at Pinta. These may be easier to get into than jumping head-long into Gimp (which would be the equivalent in Windows of jumping head-long into Photoshop)!

A lot of it comes down to what did you do with your computer before?

Soon after I started my Linux experience I gave myself the challenge to "do everything I do in Windows, except in Linux". It took a few years for Linux to rise to the challenge, for me to learn enough about Linux and open source, and for my needs to change but ultimately I have been successful! My family used Ubuntu Linux for a few years and the only deviation is my wife who is more comfortable with some Windows application-only features. She still uses the Ubuntu Linux desktop daily, though.

Something that may be handy is to set up an Ubuntu One account. This allows your files to be synchronized (backed up) with the cloud and if you have a lot of files on Windows you want to make available on Ubuntu you can install Ubuntu One on Windows, move the files there (and let them upload into Ubuntu One on the cloud), and then they will synchronize with your Ubuntu account. I've used Dropbox this way for a while, but that was before the Windows version would work for me (it does now) and it is cross-platform and cross-distribution as well (Ubuntu One is Ubuntu-only at this point).

Explore! Learn! Have Fun! And don't worry about asking questions, it's how we all learned!

UrFriendlyVirus
July 9th, 2012, 04:43 PM
Wonderful News!

Well for video games, at least, Steam has Play On Linux if you are interested. It's rumoured that an official Steam client will be coming to Linux soon. But for now this is a community project. Not sure if it entices you. Here is the link (https://developer.valvesoftware.com/wiki/Steam_under_Linux) to the Valve Developers Community Play On Linux page anyway.

Have Fun!!
(And congrats!)
-UrFriendlyVirus

AlbertJB
July 9th, 2012, 04:59 PM
But with those apps, Krita and MyPaint (and others), you cannot resize the image pointing the cursor to the image borders, because there are no borders! Also, selecting a rectangular area and moving it to another part of the picture is not trivial, if possible.

Please correct me if I am wrong, but I've just tried that with those 2 apps with no "luck".

Dragonbite
July 9th, 2012, 05:12 PM
But with those apps, Krita and MyPaint (and others), you cannot resize the image pointing the cursor to the image borders, because there are no borders! Also, selecting a rectangular area and moving it to another part of the picture is not trivial, if possible.

Please correct me if I am wrong, but I've just tried that with those 2 apps with no "luck".

I didn't know there were any image editing programs that allowed you to resize an image by grabbing the image border.

I know Office programs and others like that where the image is being embedded in the file may have a visual means of sizing it on a page do, maybe even LibreOffice Draw.

Usually I go into Image > Resize or Image > Canvas Size to resize my images in most programs I use so that's where I would look first.

Did you try Pinta? MyPaint and Krita are actually more drawing than image editing programs. Pinta and Gimp are more image editing I believe (subject to be wrong :lolflag: )

AlbertJB
July 9th, 2012, 05:51 PM
You can notice the blue border of the picture which you can drag to resize (i don't know if it's the best word to define the action) the image. :

http://imagebin.org/220085

mastablasta
July 9th, 2012, 06:05 PM
you have the whole image marked. but you are right it doesn't seem to be resizing it (at leats in old gimp) however it does resize it in inkscape. but that one is vector graphics

AlbertJB
July 9th, 2012, 06:30 PM
@mastablasta What do you mean I have the whole image marked? Well, that's the actual point, with other editors you cannot have it marked. You cannot make the image larger or shorter draging the borders. Take this other image of my own Desktop Screenshot (i warn you, I use gnome classic :P): http://imagebin.org/220089

By the way, thanks for your Guayadeque recommendation, maybe I'll give it a try later and give you my opinion :)

HunterDX77M
July 9th, 2012, 08:20 PM
Welcome to Ubuntu!

There are plenty of programs that replace the standard ones in Windows:
MS Office --> Libre Office
Photoshop --> GIMP
Internet Explorer --> FF, Chrome, Opera, etc.
The list goes on.

As for games, I don't know if you were into it 10+ years ago, but I love Mupen64 Plus. It's an emulator for the Nintendo 64. There's also Visual Boy Advance for GBA games and other systems still further back like SNES emulators.

I don't know your computer background, but there are also some great IDE's if you're into programming like Geany. The best IM client available for Ubuntu is Pidgin (you can simultaneously use AIM, Google, Yahoo, etc.).

Good luck and enjoy Ubuntu.

xoScarlettRose
July 10th, 2012, 12:17 AM
Lots of wonderful suggestions! GIMP was definitely one of the first things that I downloaded! Any suggestions for making phone calls? Currently I use google voice and gmail to have my email and calling together. I'd prefer to not use Google are there any known alternatives?

VE6EFR
July 10th, 2012, 01:21 AM
For phone calls you can give Skype a try. Theer is an older version in the software center that you can download, or you can grab the newest version from the Skype website.

afixane
July 10th, 2012, 01:54 AM
Wellcome to freedom! :D

Skype is good for VoIP, but some guy in omgubuntu told me, you're stalked by microsoft when using skype. Ekiga is good alternative for skype :D

If you miss WinAmp or just want simple music player, try Audacious or LXmusic. Umm, for game, if you like FPS, Alien Arena is a good game.

robtygart
July 10th, 2012, 02:09 AM
My Favorite programs.

Media:
Banshee
VLC

Messaging:
Thunderbird
Pidgen for Messenger & IRC

Photography:
RawTherapee
Gimp

thomsebastin
July 10th, 2012, 03:48 AM
my recommendationsterminal-guake,yakuake.music player-clementine,amarokvideo player-sm player,vlc media playerimage editing-gimpvector image pgrm-inkscapevideo editor-kdenlive,openbox,pitiviaudio editor-audicitytweaking-ubuntu tweak(gnome tweak 4 gnome)web browser-you've FF by default..i like it well..you could try out chrome o opera n decide for yourself which suits u well.file manager-nautilus by default s good.you can also use different one which i won't recommend due to some minor issues.backup-back in time,lucky backup,grsync(you've deja dup by default which s good too.).command line backup include rsync n tar packaging.mail client-thunderbird.wait i'm from mobile..i'll add more once i reach home..all the options above r my personal choice..you're free to try em..you can also try what others recommend..

mojo risin
July 10th, 2012, 08:10 AM
I like mtpaint graphic editor, or if it is a bit lighter (and good to use as a ms paint substitue) Xpaint.

black veils
July 10th, 2012, 12:56 PM
games:

- hedge wars (like PS1 worms armageddon)
- supertux (like mario)
- supertuxkart (like mario kart)
- ace of penguins (for solitaire etc)
- gnibbles (snake game)


general:

- minitube (watching youtube videos with less resources)
- vlc (media player, i like this for dvd's)
- xfce4-screenshooter (my preferred screenshot app)
- lxtask (my preferred task manager, its also light)

xoScarlettRose
July 10th, 2012, 11:21 PM
Google Voice gives you a number and unlimited calling for free for domestic calls and stuff. Anything similar to that??

Ubun2to
July 11th, 2012, 12:05 AM
Well, congratulations on cutting the cord. I still use Windows for some games-I just need to get the money to buy them on Desura, and I'm also waiting for Steam on Linux (I'm addicted to Portal).
So, allow me to suggest some programs you can use as replacements.
Anti-Virus: no need to worry about that on Linux-there currently are none (just be careful at all times, you never know when one might pop up).
Firewall: GUFW (refer to this guide (https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Firewall) on firewalls).
Registry Cleaner: registry? You mean that Windows exclusive piece of crap?
MS Office: LibreOffice (built in), OpenOffice.org.
Internet Explorer (as if anyone still uses that): Chrome, Chromium (open source Chrome), Firefox (built in), Opera, Epiphany, and lots more that I don't care to name.
Flash: Chrome (Flash is built in), Flash (Firefox plugin).
Notepad/Wordpad: GEdit (built in).
Windows Media Player/iTunes: Clementine, Rythymbox (built in), Banshee, iTunes (only works under VMs-no PlayOnLinux or Wine support).
Solitare: AisleRiot Solitare (built in).
Frecell: FreeCell Solitare (built in).
Games: Gnome Games (package is gnome-games-extra-data), Hearts.
Other Games: Desura, Gameolith (online store), PlayDeb (online store, with plenty of free titles).
Connect to Windows Server Share: Samba (tutorial here (http://www.liberiangeek.net/2012/04/common-tasks-to-perform-in-ubuntu-12-04-precise-pangolin/)).
Outlook Express/MS Outlook: Thunderbird (built in), Geary, lots more (Ubuntu Software Center->Internet->Mail).
Windows Movie Maker: Avidermux, PiTiVi Video Editor.
MS Paint/Photoshop: GIMP (for Photoshop users), Pinta (for Paint.NET users), Shotwell (for MS Office Picture Manager users; built in), Inkscape (vectors), MyPaint (for Paint users), RawTherapee (for Digital Photo Professional Users).
These are just a few of the many alternatives to Windows applications. Some Windows programs can run under Wine and/or Play on Linux. However, this is NOT a guarantee. If you want Windows programs, try to find alternatives. If you can't find any, you can try to run them under Wine. If all else fails, you can use a VM like VirtualBox (although VirtualBox doesn't do well for gaming).
I hope this helps you on your wonderful trip in the open source land of Linux.

sudo smith
July 11th, 2012, 10:40 AM
I'm surprised no one mentioned "Battle for Wesnoth" yet for games. It's a good game if you like turn based strategy/tactics games. Welcome to Ubuntu!

xoScarlettRose
July 11th, 2012, 11:03 PM
Thanks for such a comprehensive list! With Wine can you run Rosetta Stone perhaps? I might just die of excitement if possible! That's the only thing that I miss about windows

Sendo Eevpix
July 11th, 2012, 11:24 PM
Well you can give something Like Grease monkey add-on For Firefox a try(Which I do love its add-ons for deviantART), though you might find Greasemonkeys add-ons for stuff like YouTube, Facebook and many other sites(But as a Reminds, just because there are add-ons to making sites better, doesn't mean the add-ons will be safe or secure.

Well with Games you might like to try LinCity-NG, which is like an older, more basic graphical version of Sim city. Though it is a patient game, that I don't usually have the patience for, I will say, I did enjoy it. Though I don't do much desktop games, rather than in-browsers. ^^

For if you like painting programs they do have 'Kolour Paint", and 'mtPaint Graphic Editor' with both being simple and Basic like Microsoft paint, with programs like 'MyPaint' which is pretty fun. ^^ Though I usually stick to the default GIMP with my Ubuntu.

Sendo Eevpix
July 11th, 2012, 11:30 PM
Thanks for such a comprehensive list! With Wine can you run Rosetta Stone perhaps? I might just die of excitement if possible! That's the only thing that I miss about windows

You can just like Photoshop, but from what several friends told me, they are programs that if you were good enough with programming and playing around with your computer, you can find that they will run with Ubuntu fairly well.

Though I can't say if it is true. I am no good at programming. :(

Wine will get the job done, though I am sad to say, at most minimal level for most things(I mean if they are windows only and worked so well for Windows, It might not be 'spot-on' that good with Wine), as the only draw back. Not to be negative, but Wine is really good, but I am clueless on what I am saying, because I never used PhotoShop, or Rosetta Stone.

caffeinatedev
July 11th, 2012, 11:50 PM
Welcome to Ubuntu and congratulations with trashing Windows! I tried getting rid of Windows entirely but alas, I still need iTunes so I run Windows in a Virtual Machine.

Check out Humble Indie Bundle for some truly amazing games and independent films.

As far as playing encrypted DVDs (basically anything from Hollywood) you'll need the libdvdcss2 codec, which is probably illegal to use in the USA, although I've never heard of someone being sued for using it.

You'll have to add the Medibuntu repository at http://medibuntu.org/ to get the codec you need.

TheMTtakeover
July 12th, 2012, 02:33 AM
):P Hallo there! Totally new to Ubuntu and I was wondering what you more seasoned users had to reccomend as far as applications, games, things to try, upgrades or just advice for the rest of us new people. Already THRILLED with Ubuntu, it makes Windows look like a total joke:lolflag: I would love to hear your advice!!! xoScarlett

Just curious can you explain how you personally think Ubuntu makes windows look like a joke.

xoScarlettRose
July 12th, 2012, 06:55 AM
Just curious can you explain how you personally think Ubuntu makes windows look like a joke.

Well I haven't had very much experiance with Ubuntu as of yet, but from beginning my computer ran MUCH faster everything loaded and worked how it said it would and I have been able to get reliable help for any issues! That alone made it seem much better for me and made me feel like it was some kind of sick joke, all the money you're suppose to pay for a windows licence when its bug ridden and tech support is usually more money you have to shell out. It just seemed rediculous to me... That's all. Every day that I use Ubuntu, I am more and more thrilled with my decision to toss windows where it belongs, in the garbage.

mastablasta
July 12th, 2012, 09:49 AM
tech support for windows is free here and last time i needed it they were quite good at it.

Dragonbite
July 12th, 2012, 03:04 PM
Well I haven't had very much experiance with Ubuntu as of yet, but from beginning my computer ran MUCH faster everything loaded and worked how it said it would and I have been able to get reliable help for any issues! That alone made it seem much better for me and made me feel like it was some kind of sick joke, all the money you're suppose to pay for a windows licence when its bug ridden and tech support is usually more money you have to shell out. It just seemed rediculous to me... That's all. Every day that I use Ubuntu, I am more and more thrilled with my decision to toss windows where it belongs, in the garbage.

Yea, my $9 for Windows 7 Enterprise should have given me the world! I'll ask them that if I ever call tech support (instead of Googling the issue and even asking questions in Linux forums).

Glad you are enjoying Ubuntu so much. I remember when I was starry-eyed about Ubuntu and Linux and to "stick it to the man" in the beginning. That was almost 10 years ago.

David Andersson
July 12th, 2012, 07:00 PM
If you miss WinAmp or just want simple music player, try Audacious or LXmusic.

Second that about Audacious. You can pimp it with WinAmp 2.x skins, and it uses very little screen estate.

I recommend you walkabout in Software Center or Synaptic. Browse thru the categories. Search for this and that. When in Synaptic, you will see dependencies before installing. If it looks okay, install it, try it, uninstall it, on to next. (I've tried 31 different music players that way. Haven't find the right one yet. :) If I could only understand how Gmusicbrowser works and what it does.)

Some of my findings: Packages "screenruler" and "pyrenamer" can be handy. Package "stellarium" for relaxation/education. Packages "screenlets" and some theme packages for eye candy. Package "focuswriter", a word processor that aims to be poetical and relaxed instead of technical and demanding. (For "focuswriter" in lucid, go to Software sources>Other>Add and add "ppa:gottcode/gcppa".)

David Andersson
July 12th, 2012, 07:36 PM
Make yourself accustomed to "workspaces" (aka "virtual desktops", "multiple desktops") and "mouse copy/paste".

Workspaces: An easy way to shift to other desktops are the key combinations Ctrl-Alt-RightArrow and Ctrl-Alt-LeftArrow. With desktop effects or compiz you can browse and select desktops with Super-E. Also learn how to move windows between desktops. Organize you workspaces!

Mouse copy/paste: You can copy and paste text without having to move the hands to the keyboard to press Ctrl-C and Ctrl-V. Just select the text with the mouse and it is copied to the mouse's own clipboard. Then move the mouse to where you want to insert the text, and click the middle button (i.e. press down scroll wheel).

If you have a clipboard manager the mouse's clipboard can interact with the keyboard's clipboard, and you can reuse old clips.

When you have gotten used to workspaces and mouse copy/paste you cannot go back to Windows even if you would want to. :) (Well, you sort of can, there are programs to achieve similar functionality in Windows.)

Ubun2to
July 13th, 2012, 11:29 AM
tech support for windows is free here and last time i needed it they were quite good at it.

Don't have a service contract? $250.
That said, their tech support misses very basic issues.
[excerpt from call to MS about Windows Server 2003 R2 DNS issues]
...
[MS] It won't let me add this site to the trusted sites list.
[Me] That's because you still have the "require HTTPS" box checked.
[MS] Where is this box located?
[Me] I'll just click it for you.
...
[end call]
They do know how to fix a bad configuration, but it's amazing the basic things they can miss.

vandamme
July 13th, 2012, 12:54 PM
Gp here and start customizing!
http://www.techsupportalert.com/content/ubuntu-tips-and-tricks.htm

caffeinatedev
July 18th, 2012, 04:44 AM
Yea, my $9 for Windows 7 Enterprise should have given me the world! I'll ask them that if I ever call tech support (instead of Googling the issue and even asking questions in Linux forums).

Glad you are enjoying Ubuntu so much. I remember when I was starry-eyed about Ubuntu and Linux and to "stick it to the man" in the beginning. That was almost 10 years ago.
...I can't decide if you're using sarcasm or not. Emotions don't translate well into text.

techvish81
July 18th, 2012, 06:47 AM
if you are open enough to learning new things , you are certainly going to like ubuntu/linux .
if you want a stable system which keeps working without hassles, stick to LTS as 12.04 right now. there may be some problems in the beginning, but it will settle down with time.