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AlexBooton
June 15th, 2012, 03:29 AM
Hi,

I'm just getting started with 12.04.

I'm sure this has been discussed b4 but WHERE'S THE @!:?!#@ MENU?

OK, I suppose the Unity approach is fine for some; but I think new users will be shocked by the lack of a menu.

Even for myself, I don't appreciate having to use the keyboard to open applications that are not on the "start bar" (or whatever you call it).

So isn't there a basic system menu lurking somewhere?

Thanks,

AB

kdane4
June 15th, 2012, 03:33 AM
Hi,

Its the top left button, with the Ubuntu logo on it called dash home.. :)

dFlyer
June 15th, 2012, 03:34 AM
Dash Home is the menu, it should be the very first icon on the launch bar. Click the second icon located on the bottom if the Dash Home and select Filtered results. Very simple. The easiest thing to do is just type the name of a program your looking for and it will pop up.

fbicknel
June 15th, 2012, 03:36 AM
I had a little trouble getting used to Unity myself. And even though it's not the answer you are looking for: try pressing and holding the Super key.

There's a menu for you ... but it's a Unity menu that tells you what all the keys do. They do some pretty neat stuff. (My current favorite is Super + W)

At first I put all the apps I wanted to start on the slide-out menu on the left side of the screen. But more and more I'm using Super + type in the first part of what I want to do.

Fingers never have to leave the keyboard.

bogan
June 15th, 2012, 10:10 AM
Hi!, AlexBooton,

You Posted:
I'm sure this has been discussed b4 but WHERE'S THE @!:???:!#@ MENU? You are right, it has, many times.

Log in to Gnome Classic (No Effects) and the old style Menu is there top Left.

[You may need to install gnome-session-fallback from Ubuntu Software Center.]

Alternatively install' ClassicMenuIndicator' and you can have the classic menu from a topbar Icon even in Ubuntu unity 3d. [gOOGLE IT.]

Chao!,bogan.

Linux_junkie
June 15th, 2012, 10:32 AM
Hi,

I'm just getting started with 12.04.

I'm sure this has been discussed b4 but WHERE'S THE @!:?!#@ MENU?

OK, I suppose the Unity approach is fine for some; but I think new users will be shocked by the lack of a menu.

Even for myself, I don't appreciate having to use the keyboard to open applications that are not on the "start bar" (or whatever you call it).

So isn't there a basic system menu lurking somewhere?

Thanks,

AB

I am assuming from your comment about the lack of a menu that you have never used an operating system prior to Windows 95. Previous versions of Windows to Windows 95 did not have a menu and you had to run your apps simply by clicking on the icon in the appropriate window.

AlexBooton
June 15th, 2012, 11:50 AM
Hi!, AlexBooton,

Alternatively install' ClassicMenuIndicator' and you can have the classic menu from a topbar Icon even in Ubuntu unity 3d. [gOOGLE IT.]

Chao!,bogan.


ClassicMenuIndicator works like a charm!

I now have my menus back!

At the risk of asking a silly question: Why doesn't Unity include this out of the box?

Thanks,

AB

AlexBooton
June 15th, 2012, 12:01 PM
I am assuming from your comment about the lack of a menu that you have never used an operating system prior to Windows 95. Previous versions of Windows to Windows 95 did not have a menu and you had to run your apps simply by clicking on the icon in the appropriate window.

Actually, w/o revealing my age, I go back way b4 that :)

I guess this is going to get me badly flamed; but if someone had said to me

"We have this great new GUI. It's better than Gnome and KDE and guess what. IT WON'T HAVE A MENU!"

My response might have been "You're kidding. Right?"

AB

philinux
June 15th, 2012, 12:24 PM
Since the query has been answered, thread moved to recurring discussions.

12.04 Desktop guide. (https://help.ubuntu.com/12.04/ubuntu-help/index.html)

zombifier25
June 15th, 2012, 12:30 PM
Actually, w/o revealing my age, I go back way b4 that :)

I guess this is going to get me badly flamed; but if someone had said to me

"We have this great new GUI. It's better than Gnome and KDE and guess what. IT WON'T HAVE A MENU!"

My response might have been "You're kidding. Right?"

AB

It does have menus. Right click menu, application menu, the System menu... you name it :D

OK, back to topic... most modern user interfaces nowadays are moving away from the traditional, "Start Menu" like menus. Just look at GNOME, Unity, and now the upcoming Windows 8. I'm not to comment on whether this change is good or bad though, but I do prefer the Dash to the traditional nested menus, since you don't have to dig though a pool of menus to find the apps I want (when I have to get out of Unity for a while and try out others WMs, I feel kinda lost at the menus).

Paqman
June 15th, 2012, 12:41 PM
Actually, w/o revealing my age, I go back way b4 that :)

I guess this is going to get me badly flamed; but if someone had said to me

"We have this great new GUI. It's better than Gnome and KDE and guess what. IT WON'T HAVE A MENU!"

My response might have been "You're kidding. Right?"

AB

Who knows, in a few years you might be saying: "Menus! Remember those?"

jockyburns
June 16th, 2012, 12:19 AM
It does have menus. Right click menu, application menu, the System menu... you name it :D

OK, back to topic... most modern user interfaces nowadays are moving away from the traditional, "Start Menu" like menus. Just look at GNOME, Unity, and now the upcoming Windows 8. I'm not to comment on whether this change is good or bad though, but I do prefer the Dash to the traditional nested menus, since you don't have to dig though a pool of menus to find the apps I want (when I have to get out of Unity for a while and try out others WMs, I feel kinda lost at the menus).


Ahh at last , someone mentions Win8. From what I've seen on the internet, Win8 isn't going to be the success that Microsoft, think it's going to be (unless your a teenage geek)
Personally (and I'm over 50) People have been using menus for almost 20 yrs (some even longer). I started my computing experience, using the command line interface,(Xenix environment) and I for one was bloody glad when the start menu came along, together with the GUI interface. I can remember a time when trying to print something off, required typing in a line of code, instead of pointing to an icon or right clicking and selecting "Print" from the drop down menu.
Whether you like menu's or not,the end user is the one who should drive software and OS development.
I find menu's very easy to navigate Certainly, much easier than anything else ( and I haven't even considered using anything with a touch screen interface yet)
I for one , think the WIMP environment is here to stay, and while it does, menu's will always have their place.

AlexBooton
June 16th, 2012, 03:18 AM
Ahh at last , someone mentions Win8. From what I've seen on the internet, Win8 isn't going to be the success that Microsoft, think it's going to be (unless your a teenage geek)
Personally (and I'm over 50) People have been using menus for almost 20 yrs (some even longer). I started my computing experience, using the command line interface,(Xenix environment) and I for one was bloody glad when the start menu came along, together with the GUI interface. I can remember a time when trying to print something off, required typing in a line of code, instead of pointing to an icon or right clicking and selecting "Print" from the drop down menu.
Whether you like menu's or not,the end user is the one who should drive software and OS development.
I find menu's very easy to navigate Certainly, much easier than anything else ( and I haven't even considered using anything with a touch screen interface yet)
I for one , think the WIMP environment is here to stay, and while it does, menu's will always have their place.

Well put!

AFAICS the driving force behind the Win8 "Metro" interface is to facilitate use on tablets and phones where, perhaps, menus are less important.

I've played a bit with Win8 and personally think the metro icons as implemented are worthless. They take up a lot of screen real estate, are ugly, and do hardly anything useful.

But that's just my opinion.

AB

reptilezone2002
June 16th, 2012, 05:31 AM
Hi,

What I said was "I'm just getting started with 12.04.". My prior experience was w/11.04 where there was actually a menu.

If you check my history on the forum you'll plainly see I was essentially inactive through the upgrades till just a couple of weeks ago.

So I think I correctly identified my qualifications on this subject. I certainly had no intention to mis-represent and I'm anything but a troll. Unless stating an opinion which, I suspect, many others share qualifies as trolling.

AB


by menues i think ur referring to the start menue like in windows .. well in ubuntu the startm enue is the dash thats the first button on the top at the left left hand bar where u can search & borows for programs files & other stuff when u start a program or some thing the menues come up in the top bar

diesch
June 16th, 2012, 05:35 AM
ClassicMenuIndicator works like a charm!

I now have my menus back!

At the risk of asking a silly question: Why doesn't Unity include this out of the box?


I've not had the time yet to get in included and nobody else did it.

kevinmchapman
June 16th, 2012, 08:17 AM
the end user is the one who should drive software and OS development.

Sounds good, doesn't it? The problem is that there is no single representative end user. I am 44 with a similar background to you, starting with DOS and UNIX. I now prefer the search approach to launching aplications and documents. Which of us should drive software and OS development?

jockyburns
June 16th, 2012, 10:40 AM
Sounds good, doesn't it? The problem is that there is no single representative end user. I am 44 with a similar background to you, starting with DOS and UNIX. I now prefer the search approach to launching aplications and documents. Which of us should drive software and OS development?


Easy answer Kev,,,, My wife !!!! She's never wrong. :lolflag::lolflag::lolflag::lolflag:

3rdalbum
June 16th, 2012, 11:20 AM
Note: Android and iOS also do not have an Applications "menu". Windows Mobile 6.5 does. Which two mobile operating systems are better out of those three?

You can click the Ubuntu logo, then click the second icon across the bottom of the Dash (for Applications). Click "See All Results". There's your applications. Click which one you want to run, and it will run.

If you want them filtered by category, click Filter Results and then click on whatever filters you want to use.

If you'd like the program on the Launcher (sidebar) for easy access, just drag it to where you want it on the Launcher.

However, most people are enthused by the fact that you can just hit the Windows key and start typing the name of the program you want, and hit Enter when the program shows up as the first result.

AlexBooton
June 16th, 2012, 08:05 PM
Sounds good, doesn't it? The problem is that there is no single representative end user. I am 44 with a similar background to you, starting with DOS and UNIX. I now prefer the search approach to launching aplications and documents. Which of us should drive software and OS development?

The obvious solution then would be to provide both.

MG&TL
June 16th, 2012, 08:12 PM
The obvious solution then would be to provide both.


Linux Mint did that with Gnome-Shell and Mint 12. It would not appear to be a success, since they dropped it this release.

You can either change the vanilla unity experience with a menu indicator (or whatever), get used to it (you never know, you might like it!), or install a different DE. Nothing wrong with KDE (Kubuntu), Xfce, (Xubuntu), and LXDE (Lubuntu).

AlexBooton
June 16th, 2012, 08:17 PM
Note: Android and iOS also do not have an Applications "menu". Windows Mobile 6.5 does. Which two mobile operating systems are better out of those three?

You can click the Ubuntu logo, then click the second icon across the bottom of the Dash (for Applications). Click "See All Results". There's your applications. Click which one you want to run, and it will run.

If you want them filtered by category, click Filter Results and then click on whatever filters you want to use.

If you'd like the program on the Launcher (sidebar) for easy access, just drag it to where you want it on the Launcher.

However, most people are enthused by the fact that you can just hit the Windows key and start typing the name of the program you want, and hit Enter when the program shows up as the first result.

As I mentioned above the trend away from menus may be driven by use on phones and tablets. Perhaps that's what's driving the thinking of the Unity developers. If no-menus is the ticket for phones and tablets; well that's just fine. But why not provide menus for desktop users who may prefer them? It would make sense to me.

BTW, Win8 does provide a fallback to the Win7 (and while biting my tongue: Vista) classic desktop with menus.

I can't speak to IOS but on droid I find that if you use more than just a basic set of apps you soon feel the need for some sort of organization (i.e. a menu). It becomes a hassle to keep searching for the app you want. Especially so if your home page is full and you need to search multiple pages.

I've partially solved that problem with a nice droid app that lets you group apps into a tree structure. Also, ICS helps a bit by allowing you to combine similar apps into one icon.

Could it be that Google is starting to feel the need for menus?! :p

AB

philinux
June 16th, 2012, 09:02 PM
Netbook remix (early unity) came out ages ago to give more vertical space i.e. all of it.. Unity on 12.04 works great on my acer 1410.

MisterGaribaldi
June 16th, 2012, 09:26 PM
I don't necessarily think Aqua is the absolute end-all, be-all in user interfaces, and in fact "classic" Gnome had certain things in it which would have really helped finish off Aqua, but anything is better than using a tablet interface on a real computer.

I wouldn't hesitate to consider Unity on a tablet, because it makes sense on a tablet. But it doesn't make sense on a regular computer. Even Apple isn't that stupid.

MG&TL
June 16th, 2012, 10:27 PM
But it doesn't make sense on a regular computer. Even Apple isn't that stupid.

...in your opinion. And you realise you're insulting the entirety of the Canonical Design Team's intelligence?

kevinmchapman
June 16th, 2012, 11:14 PM
The obvious solution then would be to provide both.

That sounds like the obvious solution, unless you are the one having to code and test both. You have not been involved in software development, have you?