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View Full Version : What excuse do you get when people say they want to go back to Windows



shadowfax1
June 12th, 2012, 08:43 PM
I've tried to convert lots of people to linux even non unity versions that imitate XP and nearly all of them want Windows back. I just don't get it especially returning to a slower non-supported XP. I understand the arguments 'my windows program isn't available in linux' but most of the time there is and it runs better. The part that kills me is when they return six months later saying 'its full of viruses and runs to slow' I think people are creatures of habit and unwilling to take on the basic learning curve. What excuses have you heard...

Redblade20XX
June 12th, 2012, 08:52 PM
It's linux is too hard for my feeble mind....:lolflag:

The average person is very lazy.

KiwiNZ
June 12th, 2012, 08:52 PM
No excuses are needed its their choice.

QIII
June 12th, 2012, 09:08 PM
People should use what works for them.

hakermania
June 12th, 2012, 09:16 PM
People should use what works for them.

This, but I think that OP actually asks what they attracts them at Windows that they can't find on windows...

I think it's simplicity and stability (let's face it Windows 7 is as stable as 12.04, and sometimes, even more stable)

QIII
June 12th, 2012, 09:20 PM
"It works for them" is what attracts them. I don't think there is a well-defined answer for that. They've used Windows since the 80s and it behaves as they expect and does what they need.

Kay The Bantu
June 12th, 2012, 09:28 PM
No excuses are needed its their choice.

Agreed, Linux is about absolute freedom. This includes the difficult and hard acceptance of the fact that not every one sees Linux the same as "We" do .

VE6EFR
June 12th, 2012, 09:32 PM
I think the reason a lot of people believe that they really need windows is because that's what they are familiar with. They see it any time they go into a Best Buy, they see it any time they look at a new computer that may be on sale in the newspaper. Once they start to see Ubuntu as an option in the big named stores they will probably start to look at it as a viable option.

wilee-nilee
June 12th, 2012, 10:07 PM
I don't bother trying to change peoples OS use; it is a self serving act, and a waste of time really.

KiwiNZ
June 12th, 2012, 10:15 PM
I don't bother trying to change peoples OS use; it is a self serving act, and a waste of time really.


+1

If asked I will help install and train, it's their PC, it's their work.

Mikeb85
June 12th, 2012, 11:00 PM
I think people want things to 'just work'. The new versions of Windows (7 and especially 8), do 'just work' and work very well. Plus will run all their favourite programs.

Linux is really only for people with very basic needs (works great if all you need is Skype, a browser, word processor, and basic functions), or for people with specialized needs who know exactly what they want out of it.

Dr. C
June 12th, 2012, 11:20 PM
The easy availability of pirated propriety software including Microsoft Windows itself. Seriously TPB and software piracy in general are the single biggest obstacles in the way of GNU / Linux and FLOSS on the desktop.

shadowfax1
June 12th, 2012, 11:24 PM
I think people want things to 'just work'. The new versions of Windows (7 and especially 8), do 'just work' and work very well. Plus will run all their favourite programs.

Linux is really only for people with very basic needs (works great if all you need is Skype, a browser, word processor, and basic functions), or for people with specialized needs who know exactly what they want out of it.

With over 40,000+ programs in the software manager and countless others tarred files there's nothing basic about it....It's kinda like why the 'home for sale by owner' concept never took off. I'm doing this with a realtor no matter what....even though it costing me more. Uncle Bill will hold my hand thru this...So my take...The sense of security, laziness, it works why change it..and a whole pile of fear of the unknown..

KiwiNZ
June 12th, 2012, 11:28 PM
The easy availability of pirated propriety software including Microsoft Windows itself. Seriously TPB and software piracy in general are the single biggest obstacles in the way of GNU / Linux and FLOSS on the desktop.

The obstacles go way further than that. Silly names like GNU/Linux and FLOSS make it sound more like cleaning and hygiene products.

lisati
June 12th, 2012, 11:36 PM
The obstacles go way further than that. Silly names like GNU/Linux and FLOSS make it sound more like cleaning and hygiene products.

Agreed.

Piracy, familiarity and jargon only form part of the picture.

Example: some of the people I work with are Facebook fans, and they seem quite happy to google the Facebook login page rather than go directly to Facebook.

szymon_g
June 12th, 2012, 11:55 PM
With over 40,000+ programs in the software manager and countless others tarred files there's nothing basic about it....

1. packages, not programs
2. sorry, but there is plenty of desktop applications on linux that seems to be in a constant beta version (stability, usability). not to mention a handful of semi- working DEs etc

Dr. C
June 13th, 2012, 12:11 AM
Agreed.

Piracy, familiarity and jargon only form part of the picture.

Example: some of the people I work with are Facebook fans, and they seem quite happy to google the Facebook login page rather than go directly to Facebook.

The best example of this is witnessing someone show another person how to use the Internet. They were instructed to open up IE (this was Windows XP) and then type "Google" into the MSN search box. By the way the success of Android has demonstrated why GNU/Linux was and is the proper term, as Android is as much “Linux” as Ubuntu is “Linux”.

If anyone believes that many of the 30%+ of desktop software users worldwide who run pirated Windows are able and willing will to pay for the Windows OS dream on. Take away software piracy as an option and GNU/Linux become the most likely alternative.

KiwiNZ
June 13th, 2012, 12:19 AM
Take away piracy and people will use what they are accustomed to or what they need to use to get done what they need to get done.

As for the term GNU/Linux, it needs to be dropped. Stick with Linux or Ubuntu or Suse or Fedora etc.

wilee-nilee
June 13th, 2012, 12:20 AM
I think people want things to 'just work'. The new versions of Windows (7 and especially 8), do 'just work' and work very well. Plus will run all their favourite programs.

Linux is really only for people with very basic needs (works great if all you need is Skype, a browser, word processor, and basic functions), or for people with specialized needs who know exactly what they want out of it.

Hmm basic needs like the Large Hadron Collider, Google, 90% of the fastest super computers, a percentile of the servers on the web.
http://www.focus.com/fyi/50-places-linux-running-you-might-not-expect/
http://www.zdnet.com/blog/open-source/where-linux-crushes-windows-like-a-bug-supercomputers/9890

I agree though that W7 is usable, but the personal maintenance is atrocious comparatively with a open source set up for a personal user.

QIII
June 13th, 2012, 01:27 AM
Linux is really only for people with very basic needs (works great if all you need is Skype, a browser, word processor, and basic functions), or for people with specialized needs who know exactly what they want out of it.

If you replace "Linux" with "Windows" this would be no less true. What does the general PC user do?

ninjaaron
June 13th, 2012, 06:14 AM
I don't bother trying to change peoples OS use; it is a self serving act...

would you care to elaborate?

wilee-nilee
June 13th, 2012, 06:54 AM
would you care to elaborate?

Everything you do may actually be a self serving act in the end.

It is not that eclectic of an idea, many psychological constructs recognize this.

Certainly this is a part of depth psychology.

This does not mean that serving yourself is a bad thing always, it is when it affects the other in a negative way that things get sticky, or conflates your self worth.

A fairly good example of this phenomena is a friend comes to you with a problem. Some of us might want to help them and provide answers to fix this problem, without being asked to do this. The friend just wants to unload the problem and just feel support, kinship, not an answer.

The question is, no matter what you do, why are you doing it?
Even if it is an act of altruism, it is a duality you serve yourself in the helping of the other.

Some of the problem with trying to explain these sort of things are that we are taught to think in dualities, in dichotomies. When very little we actually experience or see, fit within this context, most things have a continuum at the least between a social norm of two ends. Like good and evil, love and hate, male and female, religious or atheist, are just a few examples. Within the context of world cultures, and even in a within-cultural circumstances these may be taught and accepted as two definitive ends when in actuality they are not. There is a whole lot of space between that is the continuum at the least and in that space the accepted ends may not be valid.

It is rather difficult to break this down in a forums context the whole philosophy on this system, it is supported by so much study from many fields that span 1000's of years of contemplation.

For me it is easier to explain the general meaning you have to apply it to the situation.

black veils
June 13th, 2012, 07:19 AM
would you care to elaborate?


how about this:

because that person would be trying to make others the same as them, perpetuating the Windows situation, when ultimately it should be about freedom of choice, not conforming to the ways of another fanatic.

Face-Ache
June 13th, 2012, 09:12 AM
So wilee-nilee, you're essentially talking about 'bank karma'?; doing a good deed not for the benefit of others, but to build up the level of good karma potentially heading back your way?

Self serving, and also potentially friendship-ending, as in "You put me onto this damn operating system!!! So you fix it!!!" when something goes wrong.

I've had a few friends see my setup, and say "Wow! Can you set me up with that?!?", and i generally say "No".

ninjaaron
June 13th, 2012, 04:34 PM
Everything you do may actually be a self serving act in the end...

So, getting people to switch OSes isn't actually more self-serving than anything else, and may arguabley be less so than a good many other things.

roelforg
June 13th, 2012, 04:55 PM
So, getting people to switch OSes isn't actually more self-serving than anything else, and may arguabley be less so than a good many other things.

Human nature 101:
Humans are lazy. Humans might seem to do things for others, but in reality, all the do is to help themselves, whether they like/notice/know/want it or not.

That is why we invented computers, because we can't be arsed to do the calculations ourselves (that's how they got started).

MisterGaribaldi
June 13th, 2012, 06:51 PM
I don't bother trying to change peoples OS use; it is a self serving act, and a waste of time really.


+1

If asked I will help install and train, it's their PC, it's their work.

Good posts, wilee-nilee and KiwiNZ. But I would take it a couple steps further than that.

1. Most people (whether we're talking about the tech industry as we are in this thread, or politics, or just life at large) are, or are raised to be, nothing more than mindless sheep. They don't have a clue, and they don't want one.

2. I don't give a @#$% what people do on their own computers. I really, really don't.

I can remember back when I'd bought my first modern Mac laptop, a G3 iBook, and I'd be sitting there in a coffee shop working away on something. People would come up to me and criticize my choice of computer. And I can remember sitting there thinking "What the *~!& business is it of yours what I choose to own?" I was usually fairly polite, but I think now I would not be nearly so polite.

I don't help others or offer free advice unless one of three conditions are met:

A. They ask for it, and show respect for it.
B. They appear initially likely to be open to help.
C. They are a friend and I know A and B are guaranteed things.

I help out on UF and places such as UF because we're a community of people oriented towards helping each other and wanting to solve problems. Though, as you may have noticed, if someone decides to cop an attitude with me here, I don't hesitate to respond with rather sharp and focused criticism of them for having done it.

In the end, folks, "it is what it is".