PDA

View Full Version : Does Linux usage require coding skills?



OpenSourceRules
June 8th, 2012, 05:39 AM
I am unable to code (nearly), although I did some "copy and paste" coding during the earlier development of Linux.

Just want to know: how many of you believe that coding is a necessary skill to use Linux?

carl4926
June 8th, 2012, 05:42 AM
No .

Metallion
June 8th, 2012, 05:43 AM
Absolutely not. Coding skills are needed for making software, not using it.

Elfy
June 8th, 2012, 06:53 AM
No.

Paqman
June 8th, 2012, 06:55 AM
No.

Irihapeti
June 8th, 2012, 06:57 AM
No. Coding is strictly optional.

lisati
June 8th, 2012, 07:11 AM
No.

Don't be fooled by the used of the word "code" when people use [code] tags: this is just a convenience to help with properly formatting information that could be anything from commands to be entered on the command line, to data for configuration files.

aysiu
June 8th, 2012, 07:32 AM
I am unable to code (nearly), although I did some "copy and paste" coding during the earlier development of Linux.

Just want to know: how many of you believe that coding is a necessary skill to use Linux? It can't be a necessary skill, as I do not code, and I've used Linux for seven years now.

QuiGonJinn130
June 8th, 2012, 07:37 AM
No need. Besides, you can always find plenty of copy and paste to help you move along should you choose to code. I switched many versions ago and never looked back.

MG&TL
June 8th, 2012, 07:43 AM
Absolutely not. Although it's a pretty awesome platform to start on if you want to give it a go. :)

roelforg
June 8th, 2012, 07:56 AM
It's not.
However, when you want to code, linux is the kid at home.

The reason most of the stuff and instructions here are in the form of terminal commands is that it's easier (and shorter/faster) to say "Hit CTRL+ALT+T and copy&past this line by line and post it's output" than to go like this "Click here, now click on the button that says this, select that from this menu, now tell us what it says here and here."(repeat until you have what you need)

My friend can't code a single line, yet he doesn't need help with his ubuntu install very often (mostly for recommendations for apps and to help him with those things that claim they *need* windows whilst wine'll do just fine (it's just that i need to help him find missing dll files)).
With distros like ubuntu, anyone that can click and type can use linux.

Erik1984
June 8th, 2012, 12:53 PM
No, definitely not. However it speeds up the learning process when you start bash scripting. Some basic terminal skills are desirable but that's not coding.

xedi
June 8th, 2012, 02:27 PM
I think the reason why some people have this misconception is based on two things:

1. It's more common to use the terminal in Linux than on other platforms: using a command line is not coding, but for lay persons this might seem similar. Note however, that you don't have to use the terminal, it's just sometimes faster and it is also much easier to explain to someone else because you just have to provide the commands and the recipient can just copy and paste them, however, it's not a requirement: you can use e.g. Ubuntu without ever touching the terminal without missing any functionality (I know of)

2. Compiling software: It's more common to find people who compile apps from source code themselves on Linux than on other platforms. However, it's very rare that you have to do it in Ubuntu. You can find most apps you need in the software-center or you download a .deb file from the web. In both cases the installation procedures is very easier, easier than on windows. I can only remember two instances where I compiled something during the past 2 1/2 years in which I used Ubuntu almost exclusively: two years ago folding@home which is a distributed computing software to computer protein folding but they also have .debs by now and a plugin for libreoffice to integrate with mendeley and I think you can find it compiled somewhere but at first glance I only saw the source and since compiling was very straight forward and fast, I just did it myself.

tl:dr: No

stalkingwolf
June 8th, 2012, 03:14 PM
my wife has used ubuntu since 2007ish. Im not sure she even knows where to find the terminal.

kurt18947
June 8th, 2012, 03:19 PM
No, definitely not. However it speeds up the learning process when you start bash scripting. Some basic terminal skills are desirable but that's not coding.

That is my experience. I use two vendor provided BASH scripts, one from Brother to install printers and one from RealTek to install an RTL8188Cus WiFi adapter. Both work very well. The only 'coding' knowledge required is how to launch the script in a terminal.

Simian Man
June 8th, 2012, 03:32 PM
Some people mistake typing commands in the terminal for coding. That's like mistaking using whiteout with oil painting, they are superficially similar, but really couln't be more different.

There are certain problems with a Linux system that can be best fixed using the terminal. However that's not "coding", it's using terminal commands. The need to do this has dropped significantly since I started using Linux ten years ago. Even if you do want or need to use the terminal, you can just search or ask for help. It's not a big deal.

Real coding is something entirely different, where you build new software in a programming languae. You certainly don't need to do that to use Linux, though as others have said, Linux does provide a nice programming environment.

chris200x9
June 8th, 2012, 04:39 PM
Don't listen to all these trolls you do need to know how to code, not just a little but a lot!

IWantFroyo
June 8th, 2012, 04:48 PM
It's helpful to know BASH for scripts, but isn't necessary.

forrestcupp
June 8th, 2012, 06:11 PM
My 8 year old boy uses Ubuntu on his computer and loves it. If you're a basic computer user, not only do you not need to code, but it's even easier than using Windows. Only people who want to go beyond basic usage need to be more advanced.


Don't listen to all these trolls you do need to know how to code, not just a little but a lot!

:lol:

Bandit
June 8th, 2012, 06:50 PM
Coding skill to use, no. Coding skills to modify, slightly if any. Coding skills to majorly change the system, then somewhat yea. But more so then anything a little common sense can go a long ways.

Bandit
June 8th, 2012, 06:59 PM
Some people mistake typing commands in the terminal for coding. That's like mistaking using whiteout with oil painting.............

I really agree with this. Using the CLI can be powerful without a doubt, but its not programming/coding. Its being a proficient user.

QIII
June 8th, 2012, 06:59 PM
Don't listen to all these trolls you do need to know how to code, not just a little but a lot!

Well, sports fans, QIII has just thrown the "FUD and BS" flag on the field.

Do you need to know "code" to use Ubuntu? No.

Does using commands (not code) in the command line make some things easier? Yes. It also makes some things easier in Windows, which also has a command line.

Do you need to know how to code to develop apps? Yes.

Are you going to be developing apps? Probably not, unless you develop them for Windows, too.

OpenSourceRules
June 8th, 2012, 08:08 PM
I think the reason why some people have this misconception is based on two things:

1. It's more common to use the terminal in Linux than on other platforms: using a command line is not coding, but for lay persons this might seem similar. Note however, that you don't have to use the terminal, it's just sometimes faster and it is also much easier to explain to someone else because you just have to provide the commands and the recipient can just copy and paste them, however, it's not a requirement: you can use e.g. Ubuntu without ever touching the terminal without missing any functionality (I know of)

2. Compiling software: It's more common to find people who compile apps from source code themselves on Linux than on other platforms. However, it's very rare that you have to do it in Ubuntu. You can find most apps you need in the software-center or you download a .deb file from the web. In both cases the installation procedures is very easier, easier than on windows. I can only remember two instances where I compiled something during the past 2 1/2 years in which I used Ubuntu almost exclusively: two years ago folding@home which is a distributed computing software to computer protein folding but they also have .debs by now and a plugin for libreoffice to integrate with mendeley and I think you can find it compiled somewhere but at first glance I only saw the source and since compiling was very straight forward and fast, I just did it myself.

tl:dr: No

Do anyone remember how tedious it was to install software from tar.gz? Fortunately I only use the latest software.

QIII
June 8th, 2012, 08:25 PM
"Back in the day" you had to roll your own kernel just to get in the game.

SeijiSensei
June 9th, 2012, 12:24 AM
And what, pray tell, does that have to do with the state of Linux today? It just seems like you're trolling to me.

Oh, and I did compile my own kernels back in the day, but I don't miss having to do that at all. In fact the last time I can recall compiling a kernel was sometime around RedHat v3. That was well over a decade ago now.

lisati
June 9th, 2012, 12:42 AM
Part of the issue, as I see it, is that the word "code" can mean different things to different people. Some examples:

Commands entered on the terminal (command line) sometimes seem like some kind of secret code to someone who is unfamiliar with them
Display systems and other hardware sometimes respond to special "codes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Escape_codes)" that control things like clearing the screen or changing monitor resolution
Forum users sometimes use code tags (BBCODE (http://ubuntuforums.org/misc.php?do=bbcode)) as a convenient way of controlling the way their contributions should be displayed

I usually associate "coding" with programming, which is a skill that isn't always needed for the casual computer user.

QIII
June 9th, 2012, 12:45 AM
@Sensei

Read the post immediately above mine. The point is that the state of affairs IS different today than it was in yesteryear and Linux is not just for geeks any more. Also read my previous post in this thread.

I'm a bit of an old timer. I started out with Unix and punch cards. The persistent myth that Linux is somehow a 1970s anachronism, that you need to be a computer scientist to use it and that it that it requires post-doctoral research baffles me.

Notice that I threw the BS flag on the playing field when someone said you had to know how to code to use Ubuntu.

Lighten up already.

The Cog
June 9th, 2012, 12:55 AM
roelforg has a good point:

The reason most of the stuff and instructions here are in the form of terminal commands is that it's easier (and shorter/faster) to say "Hit CTRL+ALT+T and copy&past this line by line and post it's output" than to go like this "Click here, now click on the button that says this, select that from this menu, now tell us what it says here and here."(repeat until you have what you need)
If you are giving instructions on how to do something on these forums, there are many different desktops to give instructions for. e.g.
If you are using Ubuntu with Unity, do this...
or if you are using Ubuntu with Gnome3 do this...
or if you are using Ubuntu with Gnome2 do this...
or if you are using Xubuntu do this...
or if you are using Kubuntu with KDE3 do this...
or if you are using Kubuntu with KDE4 do this...
or if you are using Lubuntu do this...
or if you are using Linux Mint with Cinnamon do this...

None of those covers a server without a GUI. However, telling someone "open a terminal and enter these commands..." covers all the above, is quicker to type, and can be quickly copy/pasted by the recipient.

lisati
June 9th, 2012, 01:16 AM
I'm a bit of an old timer. I started out with Unix and punch cards. The persistent myth that Linux is somehow a 1970s anachronism, that you need to be a computer scientist to use it and that it that it requires post-doctoral research baffles me.

I started at school with punched cards back in the 1970s, before you could go down to your local mall and buy a ready to use computer for your home. I never got to see "the computer" which was probably one of the IBM 370 range or similar. In those days, there was a certain mystique about computers: many were large expensive beasts that were kept locked away in air-conditioned rooms with special fire extinguisher systems.

Times and technology have changed. If I had the inclination and skills to do so, the assorted bits of computer hardware scattered around my lounge could probably be configured to outperform the mainframe that I ran my first program on. To cap it off, my current setup means getting video footage from the laptop I'm typing this on to display on my TV, complete with basic surround sound, doesn't need an electrical engineering degree.

Greenborn
June 9th, 2012, 02:17 AM
I am unable to code (nearly), although I did some "copy and paste" coding during the earlier development of Linux.

Just want to know: how many of you believe that coding is a necessary skill to use Linux?

None needed.

Dr. C
June 9th, 2012, 03:15 AM
I started at school with punched cards back in the 1970s, before you could go down to your local mall and buy a ready to use computer for your home. I never got to see "the computer" which was probably one of the IBM 370 range or similar. In those days, there was a certain mystique about computers: many were large expensive beasts that were kept locked away in air-conditioned rooms with special fire extinguisher systems.

Times and technology have changed. If I had the inclination and skills to do so, the assorted bits of computer hardware scattered around my lounge could probably be configured to outperform the mainframe that I ran my first program on. To cap it off, my current setup means getting video footage from the laptop I'm typing this on to display on my TV, complete with basic surround sound, doesn't need an electrical engineering degree.

No coding required to use GNU / Linux. As for the old IBM 360/370 and subsequent Amdhal compatible mainframes. I still remember the punched cards, paper tapes, and green terminals from University. Coding was required then especially when one had to transfer data from a PDP 8 to the mainframe via sneakernet using paper tape. Now that I think about it I still have the program I used back then sitting on some directory on my Ubuntu 12.04 system.

patrickceg
June 9th, 2012, 04:48 AM
Although I do know how to "code", I don't use that skill in my day-to-day use of Linux. Since you did say "Linux" and not a specific distribution, go out and ask a whole bunch of Android users, or users who indirectly use Linux by browsing web pages served by Apache under linux, if they know how to code :razz:

Bandit
June 9th, 2012, 05:10 AM
Do anyone remember how tedious it was to install software from tar.gz? Fortunately I only use the latest software.

Are you talking about software that hasnt been compiled into binary yet? I often configure and install my own. I really dont think much about it. But repos are much easier and best way for most everyone to go.

At least no one here has to program your own mode lines into xfree86.conf to get your monitor to show past 640x480 or /mount /cdrom or umount to open your cdrom drives anymore. Or for that matter have to input it into fstab and mtab for it to function first. You guys have it so easy these days.. LOL :lolflag: