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Metallion
May 14th, 2012, 07:17 AM
Ubuntuforums doesn't have a thread yet where we can discuss books so let's make one. Feel free to discuss anything related to books and reading here.

I just finished The Hunger Games trilogy myself. Up until halfway the second book I thought it was soso. Enough to read on but nothing to be amazed by. After that it got pretty good, though. Finished the third book in less than a week. :)

lisati
May 14th, 2012, 07:50 AM
Many of the books in my personal connection have a spiritual/religious tone to them, so what I can share about them is limited by the CoC.

One book I've seen mentioned in the forum in the past is "Rebel Code" - I have a copy somewhere that I picked up for $2 when my local library decided that it no longer wanted it.

Speaking of my local library, when I visited the other week, I noticed that they have a copy of Ubuntu Unleashed, 2010 edition. (A special "hello" to U-G & Matthew at this point)

I'm currently working my way through "One flew over the cuckoo's nest" by Ken Kesey for the third time. I recall trying to read it for English class back in the 1970s, about the time the film came out, and not making it past the first few pages. Although the movie version focuses on Jack Nicholson's character, the book is narrated from the perspective of the Chief.

Face-Ache
May 14th, 2012, 08:02 AM
I've been going through a phase of 'hardcore sci-fi' and 'Vietnam War' books lately.

The two titles that have really stood out for me, are Joe Haldeman's "The Forever War", which is seriously good, tech-based sci-fi (rather than fantasy based). And a Vietnam War book called "Sympathy for the Devil" by Kent Anderson.

If you have even a passing interest in either genre, you should definitely check these books out.

Special mention to Robert A Heinlein's "Friday" - i re-read it recently, probably the 10th time i've read it to be fair, and it's still just pure awesome. Friday is such a babe :D

Metallion
May 14th, 2012, 08:18 AM
I've heard about sympathy for the devil but not the others. What exactly made them stand out so much for you?

wilee-nilee
May 14th, 2012, 08:23 AM
Trying to read the tibetan book of the dead. Not the easiest read that is for sure. :)

Face-Ache
May 14th, 2012, 09:14 AM
I've heard about sympathy for the devil but not the others. What exactly made them stand out so much for you?

Well the sci-fi ones are chock-full of awesome future-technology - i love that sort of thing. They both also seem to me to be totally plausible visions of the future.

With Friday, I also liked it's ideas of future social concepts and the ideas behind them. The Forever War deals with encountering an alien race in an interesting way, and has some concepts of time/space and Artificial Intelligence that are quite different.

Sympathy For The Devil is just a well written book about war, it's easy to read, and quite funny in many parts.

mips
May 14th, 2012, 09:51 AM
Reading a lot of Lee Child & David Baldacci novels lately.

zombifier25
May 14th, 2012, 10:23 AM
I rarely read novels, but I do read Stephen Hawking's books. All 2 of 'em ;)
Also, An Introduction to Language is pretty interesting too. Linguists will find them very helpful, while average readers (like me) will find it entertaining.

Face-Ache
May 14th, 2012, 10:27 AM
I tried reading a brief History of Time - it got really beyond me, really quickly :) Kinda like Robert A Heinleins "Number of the Beast". As soon as he started talking about quantum mechanics, i got totally lost.

wilee-nilee
May 14th, 2012, 10:32 AM
I tried reading a brief History of Time - it got really beyond me, really quickly :) Kinda like Robert A Heinleins "Number of the Beast". As soon as he started talking about quantum mechanics, i got totally lost.

Now that is my favorite type of reading I have a few other armchair physics books, lol because that is all I sort of understand. It takes a bit of creativity to imagine some of the things you read in these books. :)

forrestcupp
May 14th, 2012, 12:51 PM
Ubuntuforums doesn't have a thread yet where we can discuss books so let's make one.
Actually, we recently had the What book are you reading (http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1857038&highlight=book+reading) thread, which was pretty popular. But it doesn't hurt to start another discussion.

I'm currently reading The Hobbit again in preparation for the first movie coming out this December. I hope PJ doesn't destroy these like he did the LoTR movies.

MisterGaribaldi
May 14th, 2012, 05:55 PM
Not much of a reader here, honestly. It really just doesn't interest me, and I have enough other stuff going on in my life that I don't have the time to dedicate to it.

shrumhead
May 14th, 2012, 06:21 PM
If you're an avid reader or somebody who doesn't read because they feel they read to slow or if you draw breath, you should check out Breakthrough Rapid Reading by Peter Kump.

This book basically takes you through one of his speed reading courses over 6ish weeks. I was skeptical at first, I thought I read pretty quickly as it was but I really had no idea. I tested myself at about 350 wpm when I began the book which is a bit above average for somebody who doesn't know how to properly speed read. Now I'm reading at a little over 2,000 wpm (material depending) and can easily finish a book that used to take me a week in just a few hours.

I highly recommend this book to anyone and everyone. It doesn't just help with leisure reading but also text books and blogs and anything with words really.

I wish to GOD I knew about this in college ><

As far as leisurely reading I just picked up the new Sookie Stackhouse novel which I'm growing incredibly tired of. Trying to find excuses to finish reading it. I also grabbed the newest City of Lost Souls by Cassandra Clare. Its a teen series but I've found myself thoroughly enjoying the series.

johnnybgoode83
May 14th, 2012, 06:24 PM
I'm going through an old spy novel phase at the moment. I'm reading The Parsifal Mosaic and really enjoying it.

mamamia88
May 14th, 2012, 07:52 PM
Finished the Hunger Games Trilogoy a few weeks ago now I'm just in a comedy book phase. Reading Chelsea Handlers book right now

Linuxratty
May 15th, 2012, 12:16 AM
Well the sci-fi ones are chock-full of awesome future-technology - i love that sort of thing. They both also seem to me to be totally plausible visions of the future.


I also love science fiction and have read reams of it over the years..I also like historical fiction and just finished The Thorn Birds.

cortman
May 15th, 2012, 12:29 AM
I too just finished the Hunger Games trilogy. The first book was fairly interesting, the second one a good bit less so, and the third was a flop. But then I tend to be pretty critical of modern literature, mainly because I almost never read it.
I am also reading Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy, and plan to take up To Have or Have Not by Ernest Hemingway. Hemingway is one of my all time greats.

asadmalik
May 15th, 2012, 08:08 AM
I ended up reading 2 books on analysing body language.But i failed miserably when i tried to implement those tricks :(

Will start reading some Malcolm Gladwell books this weekend.

nec207
May 15th, 2012, 08:40 AM
Well the sci-fi ones are chock-full of awesome future-technology - i love that sort of thing. They both also seem to me to be totally plausible visions of the future.

With Friday, I also liked it's ideas of future social concepts and the ideas behind them. The Forever War deals with encountering an alien race in an interesting way, and has some concepts of time/space and Artificial Intelligence that are quite different.

Sympathy For The Devil is just a well written book about war, it's easy to read, and quite funny in many parts.

If you like future-technology you may like this book http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physics_of_the_Future

Well I'm trying to get books now on stem cell , target drugs and have not found any thing yet .

I also need to understand scale law or allometry of living things and have found no books on this.


I'm not really into physics or quantum mechanics like I was in collage.

Metallion
May 17th, 2012, 07:30 AM
I'm currently reading The Hardcore Diaries by Mick Foley. That guy's famous for being a hardcore wrestler but when he's not taking chairs hots to the head or being choke slammed through a cage, he's actually a really good writer. For a wrestling fan like me his autobiographies are a lot of fun to read.

forrestcupp
May 17th, 2012, 11:39 AM
As I'm reading The Hobbit again (haven't read it for several years), this is the first time I've realized that it seems to be written for a younger audience than Lord of the Rings. It's almost like it wasn't written by the same person. It's still an excellent book, though.


I ended up reading 2 books on analysing body language.But i failed miserably when i tried to implement those tricks :(

:lol: That's pretty dangerous.

DingusFett
May 17th, 2012, 12:17 PM
I'm currently reading The Hardcore Diaries by Mick Foley. That guy's famous for being a hardcore wrestler but when he's not taking chairs hots to the head or being choke slammed through a cage, he's actually a really good writer. For a wrestling fan like me his autobiographies are a lot of fun to read.

I'm a pretty big wrestling fan (NOT WWE/TNA, I don't consider that crap wrestling), but haven't had a chance to read this yet. Outside of the ring, Mick is an all-round good guy. Has done a lot of raising money for charity, and is a good writer. He has also published a children's book.

I am a huge fan of the Star Wars Expanded Universe, so most of the books in my collection are Star Wars books, currently waiting on the final book in the Fate of the Jedi series to arrive to start reading it. Apart from that, anybody who is into fantasy books should read the Axis Trilogy, Wayfarer Redemption Trilogy, and Darkglass Mountain Trilogy, all by Sara Douglass. They are an absolutely fantastic, well-written series. Easily the best books I've read (the last book in the Darkglass Mountain trilogy did felt like it was dragging though).

Eldera
May 17th, 2012, 12:32 PM
As I'm reading The Hobbit again (haven't read it for several years), this is the first time I've realized that it seems to be written for a younger audience than Lord of the Rings. It's almost like it wasn't written by the same person. It's still an excellent book, though.

If I recall correctly, I read several articles years and years ago that indicated that Tolkein did this on purpose. He aimed his books at different audiences and had the talent to make them different.

Edit: I personally feel he was better writing on an adult level than on a juvenile level, but I agree that the Hobbit is still a good book.

graabein
May 17th, 2012, 03:14 PM
Recent books I've read/am reading:


JavaScript patterns
Coders at work
The Nordvig LISP book, paradigms of AI programming
Land of LISP
Refactoring Ruby edition
End of the affair by Graham Greene
Tinker tailor soldier spy by Lecarre
Oblomov (that sleepy Russian, just started)
I, Alan Partridge, we need to talk about Alan

jmull
May 17th, 2012, 04:32 PM
Most of the books I'm reading aren't very interesting to most but here goes:


Feminist Political Ecology: Global Issues and Local Experience edited by Diane Rocheleau, Barbara Thomas-Slayter, and Esther Wangari
Second Treastise of Government - John Locke
Property is Theft: An Anthology of Pierre Proudhon edited by Iain McKaye
Black Flame: The Revolutionary Class Politics of Anarchism and Syndicalism - Lucien van der Walt and Michael Schmidt
1984 - George Orwell

cariboo
May 17th, 2012, 07:42 PM
I'm currently reading the the Empire of Man (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Empire_of_Man) series by David Weber and John Ringo, the series consists of four books


March Upcountry
March to the Sea
March to the Stars
We Few


I'm just about finished March to the Stars, and will start We Few in the next couple of days.

Face-Ache
May 18th, 2012, 04:02 AM
I've just finished Sap Rising by AA Gill.

What attracted me to it was the fluro-green jacket, and the quote "Do NOT buy this book!" on the cover.

It's quite a rude book, theres a bit of sex in it, so if you're offended by that kind of stuff, it's probably not for you. But it's one of the funniest books i've ever read, had me literally crying with laughter at some points. Seriously outrageous.

I've since found out that AA Gill is a food critic/writer from London. He has a very accessibly style, and a truly acerbic wit.

The book is essentially about a small suburban council garden in London, and the neighbouring properties owners attempts to control what happens to that garden. I know, it sounds super-boring, but it was an incredibly good read. Recommended.

Metallion
May 18th, 2012, 08:22 AM
I'm a pretty big wrestling fan (NOT WWE/TNA, I don't consider that crap wrestling), but haven't had a chance to read this yet. Outside of the ring, Mick is an all-round good guy. Has done a lot of raising money for charity, and is a good writer. He has also published a children's book.

Indeed Mick looks like a really good guy outside of the ring. The kind of guy that I would love to sit down and have a drink with. In addition to that children's book I believe he wrote a few novels too. I'm sticking with his wrestling books for now though.

Speaking of wrestling books, I also read Brock Lesnar's autobiography. That book I'd describe as a huge 10T block of testosterone. I mainly read it because I'm really into psychology and recognized several patterns in his behaviour before and after his UFC fights. Gave me some suspicions about his childhood and I wanted to check if I was right. Turned out I was. :)

simpleblue
May 18th, 2012, 01:33 PM
I am also reading Anna Karenina by Leo Tolsoy

I finished reading this for the second time. It's one of my all time favorites. Currently I'm reading War and peace for the second time.

xcasex
May 18th, 2012, 01:42 PM
Rereading:
Legion - Dan Abnett.

queue:

Various poems by the swedish poet Maja Ljuslinder, some very powerful stuff in there.

Deaths head trilogy

Various Valentine novels by Lilith Saint Crow

Brave New War - John Robb

The Seven Deadly Sins - Corey Taylor

SXE - Ross Haenfler

Face-Ache
May 19th, 2012, 11:39 AM
xcasex, your earlier post about writing software, and the information in the link to the George Orwell book reminded me of Dan Fante's Chump Change. Which i started re-reading today.

Man, that is a seriously nasty book.