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tuxerman
May 10th, 2012, 04:55 PM
Hey folks

This is probably way off ubuntu but not quite out of bounds for the Community Cafe I believe. I have a job offer from a company with a global presence, which is engaged in a variety of sectors - industrial automation, transport, etc to name a few. I am assigned a software development job, which would be providing the software backend for all their above mentioned hardware systems. I am told that I would be working exlusively on windows platforms, and mostly be involved in windows-application development. Basically, I am not from a CS background, and most of my programming skills have been self taught. The job would undoubtedly teach me a lot of mainstream stuff.

I really have gotten used to using linux, tinkering a lot in python, the shell etc. While I may continue doing the same, and perhaps (baby steps) engage myself by participating in an open-source project or two - would I be able to carry off my career-based experience (writing windows based software for a product based company) and my love (and mostly self-made experience) in linux and stuff, and perhaps do a masters in CS or in the long terms switch towards a career more in the line of using linux, shell or python (while we're still dreaming, something like google perhaps? :P).

So any suggestions on how to keep my resume alive with the good stuff while I am writing stuff in .NET and Java?

Apologies if the question seems confusing, am a tad confused as well :D

Dragonbite
May 10th, 2012, 07:21 PM
Hey folks

This is probably way off ubuntu but not quite out of bounds for the Community Cafe I believe. I have a job offer from a company with a global presence, which is engaged in a variety of sectors - industrial automation, transport, etc to name a few. I am assigned a software development job, which would be providing the software backend for all their above mentioned hardware systems. I am told that I would be working exlusively on windows platforms, and mostly be involved in windows-application development. Basically, I am not from a CS background, and most of my programming skills have been self taught. The job would undoubtedly teach me a lot of mainstream stuff.

I got into programming without a CS degree; Excel -> VBA -> Access w/VBA -> ASP & SQL Server -> ASP.NET. Most of it is self-taught until my current company which has been sending me for .NET training.

Meanwhile at home I had for a long time been running Linux.


I really have gotten used to using linux, tinkering a lot in python, the shell etc. While I may continue doing the same, and perhaps (baby steps) engage myself by participating in an open-source project or two - would I be able to carry off my career-based experience (writing windows based software for a product based company) and my love (and mostly self-made experience) in linux and stuff, and perhaps do a masters in CS or in the long terms switch towards a career more in the line of using linux, shell or python (while we're still dreaming, something like google perhaps? :P).

So any suggestions on how to keep my resume alive with the good stuff while I am writing stuff in .NET and Java?

Apologies if the question seems confusing, am a tad confused as well :D

While the syntax will change from language to language, the concept behind them is fairly similar. You should be able to transfer knowledge in one area to the other and vice-verse.

I've been doing a few things in PHP and MySQL on a Linux server and using quite a bit of what I know from my ASP/ASP.NET experience. Google has helped me to fill in the blanks of "I would do it in VB.net like this, how do I do it in PHP?".

I also keep telling myself I should start fooling around with Mono, but I never seem to get around to it. I also try convincing myself to try Python or even Java but nothing seems to happen with any of them. PHP is successful but that is only because I have some projects written in them that I use like once a year (our church's auction registration and cash-out program).

So I wouldn't be too worried.

Plus, funny thing I've seen is a couple of companies that I am kinda interested in, except they use Java and Oracle instead of .NET and SQL Server!

forrestcupp
May 10th, 2012, 07:52 PM
While the syntax will change from language to language, the concept behind them is fairly similar. You should be able to transfer knowledge in one area to the other and vice-verse.

I agree with this. You'll learn good programming techniques, problem solving, and coming up with algorithms. Chances are, you'll learn about Object Oriented Programming. Learning language syntax and frameworks is easy. It's these other things that are key.

You'll be able to translate your experience over to Linux programming. Just don't expect you're going to be able to go out and get a good paying job programming for Linux, unless it's working with Linux servers or something. There's not much out there for programming Linux on the client side, though.

directhex
May 11th, 2012, 12:44 PM
So any suggestions on how to keep my resume alive with the good stuff while I am writing stuff in .NET and Java?

Plenty of .NET and Java apps in Ubuntu. Contribute to those.

ratcheer
May 11th, 2012, 12:59 PM
Take the job. Experience is experience and it will help you, not hurt you. It will make you more versatile and, therefore, more valuable in the future. That seems to be what employers want, these days.

I had a 34-year IT career. The last 14 years, I concentrated on becoming the best Oracle DBA on UNIX platforms I could be. But then I lost my job in the big recession. When I was job hunting, everybody also wanted me to be experienced in MS SQL Server and .Net programming. But I didn't know anything at all about them. I was unsuccessful at finding a new job for about two years, then I just gave up and retired. It definitely hurt me to not know Microsoft stuff.

Tim

Dragonbite
May 11th, 2012, 02:03 PM
One question is how much do you really need to know or have experience with, before you put it on a resume?

For example, I have experience with .NET, if I were to start toying around with Java on the side when should I have enough to put on my resume?

This is just a question for discussion purposes.

Shadius
May 11th, 2012, 02:16 PM
Take the job. Experience is experience and it will help you, not hurt you. It will make you more versatile and, therefore, more valuable in the future. That seems to be what employers want, these days.

I had a 34-year IT career. The last 14 years, I concentrated on becoming the best Oracle DBA on UNIX platforms I could be. But then I lost my job in the big recession. When I was job hunting, everybody also wanted me to be experienced in MS SQL Server and .Net programming. But I didn't know anything at all about them. I was unsuccessful at finding a new job for about two years, then I just gave up and retired. It definitely hurt me to not know Microsoft stuff.

Tim

I agree. You can only learn more from here and it'll build on your current skills. Take the job, learn more, and remain versatile, and employers will find you to be an asset to their company.

tuxerman
May 11th, 2012, 09:48 PM
Thanks a lot, everyone! Looking forward to getting a good experience of the stuff. Btw, I have a degree in electronics, and from what I've been told, the software is supposed to be for their hardware systems.. Looks like I'd gain some good workaround knowledge of the electrical systems as well.. should be fun :)

tuxerman
May 11th, 2012, 09:51 PM
One question is how much do you really need to know or have experience with, before you put it on a resume?

For example, I have experience with .NET, if I were to start toying around with Java on the side when should I have enough to put on my resume?

This is just a question for discussion purposes.

Well I guess just putting 'Experienced in Java', etc is not going to tell the employer anything. It would be much better to put what exactly your experience was (worked on A,B,C for implementing X,Y on the Android Platform) so that it wouldn't be ambiguous. That would tell them all they needed to know.

forrestcupp
May 12th, 2012, 02:23 AM
Well I guess just putting 'Experienced in Java', etc is not going to tell the employer anything. It would be much better to put what exactly your experience was (worked on A,B,C for implementing X,Y on the Android Platform) so that it wouldn't be ambiguous. That would tell them all they needed to know.

But then you'd get sued by Oracle. :)

psycosmyth
May 12th, 2012, 07:17 AM
Do it. We can not be so one sided with programming. It is all for us to take in and run. I love all platforms and would be thrilled to learn more, it's all binary in the end anyway.

markbl
May 12th, 2012, 08:38 AM
I've been developing software on Unix/Linux my whole life. I would never take any job working with Microsoft or Windows technologies. I'd rather clean floors.

tuxerman
May 12th, 2012, 03:56 PM
I've been developing software on Unix/Linux my whole life. I would never take any job working with Microsoft or Windows technologies. I'd rather clean floors.

Just curious, what do you do for a living?

forrestcupp
May 12th, 2012, 06:10 PM
I've been developing software on Unix/Linux my whole life. I would never take any job working with Microsoft or Windows technologies. I'd rather clean floors.

Lol. More power to ya.