PDA

View Full Version : Ubuntu Abandons Desktop and Corporate Users



rockney
April 27th, 2012, 06:26 PM
Given Ubuntu has chosen to force their ultimate "Unity or nothing" approach on the Linux community it is time to find a replacement distro.

The overly simplistic user interface is entirely inappropriate for users who make their living on a computer, especially with lots of screen space. The lack of functionality and loss of ease-of-use is intolerable. Further, requiring special procedures and extra work to switch from Unity to GNome is expensive and time-consuming for clients with many systems. And those users do not trust Ubuntu to continue supporting GNome.

Ubuntu has lost it's way which is very disappointing. Shuttleworth says "Unity is here to stay". That is the downfall of Ubuntu that will destroy the organization.

NO ONE is going to replace the O/S shipped on a touchy wireless toy device in favor of Unity - and Unity is useless on a desktop. So where does that leave Ubuntu?

nothingspecial
April 27th, 2012, 06:28 PM
Thread moved to Recurring Discussions.

ojdon
April 27th, 2012, 06:37 PM
sudo apt-get install <INSERT DESKTOP ENVIROMENT OF CHOICE>

/thread

oldfred
April 27th, 2012, 06:38 PM
Not sure where you get Unity or nothing?

I am running fallback mode and if that was the default there would be only a few minor complaints as a couple of things are in slightly different locations.

You can install easily

gnome-session-fallback or gnome-panel- which is almost gnome2
or
gnome3
or
and any of the other versions always offered:
kubuntu-desktop (the whole kde environment)
xubuntu-desktop (the whole xfce4 environment)
lubuntu-desktop (the whole LXDE desktop environment)
edubuntu-desktop (the whole kids/schools oriented gnome environment)

Version Dependency
April 27th, 2012, 06:43 PM
I'm confused. I fire up the Software Center and I have literally DOZENS of different desktop environments and window managers to choose from. There are half a dozen or so NEW options that weren't there when the last LTS was released.

So enough with the whining. Heck, I don't like KDE....never have. But I've never ever started a thread or posted a blog telling the world how much it sucks or telling the people that develop it or use it that they are wrong for doing so. I mean, seriously...I'd have to have some kind of mental condition to act that way, right?

rockney
April 27th, 2012, 06:53 PM
Not sure where you get Unity or nothing?

From what we've read Ubuntu is going to drop GNome support entirely in favor of Unity. Is that accurate?

Commercial users do not perform major upgrades often. It's just too expensive. So if Unity will soon be the only reasonable user interface for Ubuntu my corporate clients want to switch away now and pay for the major upgrade once.

Even with the 12 release a user must go through special customization procedures to get GNome installed and tweaked. But when they have 700 desktops to touch those steps are just too costly.

Again - Ubuntu needs a GNome-based distro, otherwise it just isn't worth it.

mamamia88
April 27th, 2012, 06:54 PM
Do corporate users really use ubuntu anyway? Wouldn't they use something like red hat, suse, or debian stable before even considering ubuntu?

Version Dependency
April 27th, 2012, 06:58 PM
From what we've read Ubuntu is going to drop GNome support entirely in favor of Unity. Is that accurate?

Are you trolling? Unity is built on Gnome 3. How can they not support Gnome? It makes no sense. And I'm sure you (and the other people you claim as "we") didn't read that anywhere.


Even with the 12 release a user must go through special customization procedures to get GNome installed and tweaked. But when they have 700 desktops to touch those steps are just too costly.

Most of Gnome 3 is installed on the system already...just not the Gnome Shell and Gnome Classic interfaces. They can both be installed with one click (installs both) in the Software Center. The download takes a few seconds.

Why not actually take a few minutes and install 12.04 in a virtualbox and test these things out before complaining about them here? You would see how silly your post is after doing so.

Sableyes
April 27th, 2012, 06:59 PM
From what we've read Ubuntu is going to drop GNome support entirely in favor of Unity. Is that accurate?

Commercial users do not perform major upgrades often. It's just too expensive. So if Unity will soon be the only reasonable user interface for Ubuntu my corporate clients want to switch away now and pay for the major upgrade once.

Even with the 12 release a user must go through special customization procedures to get GNome installed and tweaked. But when they have 700 desktops to touch those steps are just too costly.

Again - Ubuntu needs a GNome-based distro, otherwise it just isn't worth it.

Rubbish. Less things for people to see, less things desk monkeys can screw up. Just because people are employed to use basic spreadsheets (emplates) and databases for invoicing doesn't mean they need everything and the kitchen sink.

Ubuntu needs a gnome based distro? Like Gnome 3? Hows that any harder / different to Unity corporation wise?

If your ranting that Ubuntu needs Gnome 2 distro, your ranting to the wrong people. Go rant at the Gnome Foundation.

newbie-user
April 27th, 2012, 07:03 PM
From what we've read Ubuntu is going to drop GNome support entirely in favor of Unity. Is that accurate?

Commercial users do not perform major upgrades often. It's just too expensive. So if Unity will soon be the only reasonable user interface for Ubuntu my corporate clients want to switch away now and pay for the major upgrade once.

Even with the 12 release a user must go through special customization procedures to get GNome installed and tweaked. But when they have 700 desktops to touch those steps are just too costly.

Again - Ubuntu needs a GNome-based distro, otherwise it just isn't worth it.

If you want a strictly Gnome-based distro, try Linux Mint, which is based on Ubuntu and uses Gnome3. Debian uses Gnome as well.

I'm using 12.04 with gnome-fallback and it looks pretty darned similar to 10.04. And really, how many of those 700 users actually tweak anything more than their desktop background and have wanda the fish?

rockney
April 27th, 2012, 07:09 PM
I'm confused. I fire up the Software Center and I have literally DOZENS of different desktop environments and window managers to choose from. There are half a dozen or so NEW options that weren't there when the last LTS was released.

So enough with the whining. Heck, I don't like KDE....never have. But I've never ever started a thread or posted a blog telling the world how much it sucks or telling the people that develop it or use it that they are wrong for doing so. I mean, seriously...I'd have to have some kind of mental condition to act that way, right?

Whoa, mental? Wrong. I'm very tired of handling damage control with hundreds of corporate users who took my advice some years ago to use Ubuntu. Not one client likes Unity. Pretty much every one has said it makes their desktop sytem look like a tablet and is hard to use. No one sees any advantage to it whatsoever.

So yes - I say the product management folks are flat wrong and have alienated their user base in favor of this Unity user interface that is based on wireless touchy toys that full-time working users just don't use. It's the difference between a sensible productive desktop and trendy mobile toys. And I contend that people will not replace the O/S shipped on those sorts of devices in favor of Unity. So where does that leave Ubuntu?

As I've said in other posts - Ubuntu should fork Unity in a distro specifically organized for mobile stuff, and have a GNome-based distro for working people.

Version Dependency
April 27th, 2012, 07:16 PM
As I've said in other posts - Ubuntu should fork Unity in a distro specifically organized for mobile stuff, and have a GNome-based distro for working people.

So all 700 people at your workplace said they hated Unity and it was unusable (I'm just going choose to believe you here), and you think the solution is a version based on the Gnome Shell? Yea, I'm sure they are going to just love that. I have the solution to your problems though: http://xubuntu.org/

newbie-user
April 27th, 2012, 07:18 PM
Whoa, mental? Wrong. I'm very tired of handling damage control with hundreds of corporate users who took my advice some years ago to use Ubuntu. Not one client likes Unity. Pretty much every one has said it makes their desktop sytem look like a tablet and is hard to use. No one sees any advantage to it whatsoever.

So yes - I say the product management folks are flat wrong and have alienated their user base in favor of this Unity user interface that is based on wireless touchy toys that full-time working users just don't use. It's the difference between a sensible productive desktop and trendy mobile toys. And I contend that people will not replace the O/S shipped on those sorts of devices in favor of Unity. So where does that leave Ubuntu?

As I've said in other posts - Ubuntu should fork Unity in a distro specifically organized for mobile stuff, and have a GNome-based distro for working people.

Okay, I see what you're saying and that makes sense. I'm no fan of Unity either. However, Ubuntu is still Ubuntu, regardless of what UI you choose. Unity just happens to be the new default. So simply preseed gnome-fallback when you upgrade and tell the users how to select it at login.

TheMTtakeover
April 27th, 2012, 07:18 PM
Whoa, mental? Wrong. I'm very tired of handling damage control with hundreds of corporate users who took my advice some years ago to use Ubuntu. Not one client likes Unity. Pretty much every one has said it makes their desktop sytem look like a tablet and is hard to use. No one sees any advantage to it whatsoever.

So yes - I say the product management folks are flat wrong and have alienated their user base in favor of this Unity user interface that is based on wireless touchy toys that full-time working users just don't use. It's the difference between a sensible productive desktop and trendy mobile toys. And I contend that people will not replace the O/S shipped on those sorts of devices in favor of Unity. So where does that leave Ubuntu?

As I've said in other posts - Ubuntu should fork Unity in a distro specifically organized for mobile stuff, and have a GNome-based distro for working people.

It literally take 3 clicks and 12 hits on the keyboard to get the gnome interface you want. If you don't how to open the software center and search "gnome shell" and then click install you really shouldn't be using a computer. I highly doubt your "Corporate Clients" would find that hard.

haqking
April 27th, 2012, 07:20 PM
Yeah i see what you mean by forced to use Unity

http://imagebin.org/210001

I wonder if this subject/topic/FUD has been discussed before at all ? mmmmm

Peace

rockney
April 27th, 2012, 07:22 PM
Do corporate users really use ubuntu anyway? Wouldn't they use something like red hat, suse, or debian stable before even considering ubuntu?

I "sold" the notion of Ubuntu and it's will-always-be-open-and-free to several corporate clients years ago. Now it's weekly damage control because of Unity. Luckily they only have Unity on a few evaluation machines. But I'm taking the heat for that and what it would cost to customize every system.

So it appears I made an expensive mistake promoting Ubuntu and now wish I hadn't. As someone suggested, maybe Xubuntu would work.

rockney
April 27th, 2012, 07:23 PM
So all 700 people at your workplace said they hated Unity and it was unusable (I'm just going choose to believe you here), and you think the solution is a version based on the Gnome Shell? Yea, I'm sure they are going to just love that. I have the solution to your problems though: http://xubuntu.org/

Our corporate clients have been using GNome for years - at our recommendation.

Thanks - we'll do an eval on the latest Xubuntu release. It wasn't that great a few years ago. But maybe it will be an acceptable path for our clients now.

Version Dependency
April 27th, 2012, 07:31 PM
Thanks - we'll do an eval on the latest Xubuntu release. It wasn't that great a few years ago. But maybe it will be an acceptable path for our clients now.

It's improved alot recently and seems to be where alot of the folks who were attached to the old Gnome 2 interface migrated to.

rockney
April 27th, 2012, 07:31 PM
Are you trolling? Unity is built on Gnome 3. How can they not support Gnome? It makes no sense. And I'm sure you (and the other people you claim as "we") didn't read that anywhere.

Most of Gnome 3 is installed on the system already...just not the Gnome Shell and Gnome Classic interfaces. They can both be installed with one click (installs both) in the Software Center. The download takes a few seconds.

Why not actually take a few minutes and install 12.04 in a virtualbox and test these things out before complaining about them here? You would see how silly your post is after doing so.

I contend my post is not "silly". It comes from weekly damage control with corporate clients because of Unity and the cost of upgrading.

We have 12.04 running on evaluation machines at client sites. They don't like Unity at all. The upgrade and configuration costs are too high. And retraining hundreds of people for Unity is out of the question.

It would be very interesting to see what would happen if users were given the choice of downloading a Unity-based distro or a GNome-based distro. I wonder which would be downloaded the most?

mamamia88
April 27th, 2012, 07:32 PM
Our corporate clients have been using GNome for years - at our recommendation.

Thanks - we'll do an eval on the latest Xubuntu release. It wasn't that great a few years ago. But maybe it will be an acceptable path for our clients now.

Try debian stable with xfce. Runs like a champ on my netbook I can only imagine how well it will run on more powerful machines. Cd1 only installs a very base system so you basically only get exactly what you want and no apps that you don't.

rockney
April 27th, 2012, 07:32 PM
UNITY IS NOT A TABLET INTERFACE!

Yes it is.

Version Dependency
April 27th, 2012, 07:35 PM
The upgrade and configuration costs are too high.

As already been pointed out...gnome fallback (Gnome Classic) can be installed with one click in the software center. The download is very quick. There is no configuration needed...it is the old Gnome 2-style desktop...but based on Gnome 3. You could install it on all 700 computers in one day. And it would be a helluva lot easier than wiping them all out and installing a new OS like Xubuntu.

It's like nothing ever changed (http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2012/03/gnome-classic-in-ubuntu-12-04-its-like-nothing-ever-changed/).

QIII
April 27th, 2012, 07:38 PM
We have 12.04 running on evaluation machines at client sites. They don't like Unity at all. The upgrade and configuration costs are too high. And retraining hundreds of people for Unity is out of the question.

Then, as a consultant, you should have done some homework. You should have known that other DEs were available and you should have simply chosen a different one to present to your clients for evaluation so that no retraining was necessary.

I'm not sorry for you. If I had done something like that to my clients, I would expect to be replaced.

You chose the wrong path, consultant. Don't blame Canonical for that.

haqking
April 27th, 2012, 07:40 PM
Then, as a consultant, you should have done some homework. You should have known that other DEs were available and you should have simply chosen a different one to present to your clients for evaluation so that no retraining was necessary.

I'm not sorry for you.

You chose the wrong path, consultant. Don't blame Canonical for that.

+1

Read/Research = No Rant and no FUD ;)

As i posted above in the image, ive got a choice of like 10 different environments for 12.04.

newbie-user
April 27th, 2012, 07:41 PM
I "sold" the notion of Ubuntu and it's will-always-be-open-and-free to several corporate clients years ago. Now it's weekly damage control because of Unity. Luckily they only have Unity on a few evaluation machines. But I'm taking the heat for that and what it would cost to customize every system.

So it appears I made an expensive mistake promoting Ubuntu and now wish I hadn't. As someone suggested, maybe Xubuntu would work.

I can sympathize somewhat, but it's really a trivial task to add gnome-fallback to all the machines. Use clusterssh and ssh into all the clients at once, then apt-get install gnome-fallback. The install will be done in like 30 seconds. Then show the evaluation machines with the gnome-fallback instead of Unity.

KiwiNZ
April 27th, 2012, 07:49 PM
This thread tells me one thing, bad implimentation and bad ongoing support. For and by the said Corporate users.

newbie-user
April 27th, 2012, 07:50 PM
The fear of change is perhaps the biggest roadblock to progress. Look what happened when Windows Vista came around. No one wanted to upgrade. Partly because Vista just plain sucked, but also because the UI was different from XP, so people were freaking out. Now Windows 8 is coming and people are freaking out again.

Gnome 2 is old. It had to die sometime. The point of this whole discussion is that with Ubuntu, you can customize it all you want. You don't have to use Unity if you don't want to, so there's really no point in complaining about it.

And of course the clients aren't going to be happy with a UI change. But anything you switch to will be a UI change. So the clients will either have to stick with their current version (which I'm sure still works well), or quit their whining and realize that life moves on with or without them.

rockney
April 27th, 2012, 07:50 PM
Then, as a consultant, you should have done some homework. You should have known that other DEs were available and you should have simply chosen a different one to present to your clients for evaluation so that no retraining was necessary.

I'm not sorry for you.

You chose the wrong path, consultant. Don't blame Canonical for that.

Not consultant - business software vendor. In 2004 GNome on Ubuntu LTS was the best around. Clients switched from the then going-commerical Redhat because that path became very shaky. Subsequent updates were all good. Now that (10.04) is getting old and they're needing to upgrade, which is a problem given Unity.

So how could anyone have foreseen that the Canonical folks were going to abandon a common user interface? The problem is a matter of upgrade and training costs.

However - someone poiinted-out that Xunbutu has made great strides in recent years so maybe that's a reasonable alternative. We're exploring a variety of approaches to this issue - including switching distros.

QIII
April 27th, 2012, 07:56 PM
Not consultant - business software vendor. In 2004 GNome on Ubuntu LTS was the best around. Clients switched from the then going-commerical Redhat because that path became very shaky. Subsequent updates were all good. Now that (10.04) is getting old and they're needing to upgrade, which is a problem given Unity.

So how could anyone have foreseen that the Canonical folks were going to abandon a common user interface? The problem is a matter of upgrade and training costs.

However - someone poiinted-out that Xunbutu has made great strides in recent years so maybe that's a reasonable alternative. We're exploring a variety of approaches to this issue - including switching distros.

Then, vendor, you should have known what you were selling. You should have been familiar with both your product and your customer base.

A car salesman who is unaware that the model of car he is selling comes with both a 4 cylinder and 6 cylinder option cuts his own throat. The Gnome developers stopped producing GNOME II. It was no longer an option. It was not a business decision by Canonical. YOU should have known that.

Still, no mercy from me.

Don't blame Canonical for the fact that you didn't know your product line.

newbie-user
April 27th, 2012, 07:58 PM
Oh dear... Gnome3 is the new Gnome. It looks completely different from Gnome2. Any new Gnome-based distro will most likely use Gnome3. So you would have to retrain anyway. Just install gnome-fallback PLEASE and give it a try.

|{urse
April 27th, 2012, 08:00 PM
So, you arent happy with unity, try another DE. If you're mad at ubuntu for implementing unity then at least be appreciative that it isn't gnome-shell, which is cool looking for 5 minutes then annoying forever (personal opinion).

As a business software vendor what on earth are you doing putting your clients on an OS that you aren't completely happy with? Fedora no longer uses standard gnome, nor does any modern distro that I'm aware of, the closest to that oldskool gnome desktop you're going to get is Mint which is based on Ubuntu. All of my customers seem to be pleased with Unity (retraining is a breeze so far) and if they aren't pleased I get them into a different DE. LXDE is very similar to what your clients are used to. Blame gnome for abandoning gnome 2, blame yourself for not rolling with the changes, but thank Ubuntu for being there for you and your clients throughout it all.

rockney
April 27th, 2012, 08:00 PM
I've seen a few constructive suggestions. Thank you folks!

But a couple of basic questions ...

1. Can anyone tell me if Ubuntu/Canonical plan to continue to provide the GNome shell as an option in the long-term? THAT is one of the fears of our clients.

2. We're looking for ways to upgrade 100's of systems running 9.04 LTS and 10.04 LTS. Is there any way to install the GNome shell the first time, as opposed to it being a separate manual operation?

3. From a different perspective - would a Xubuntu 12.04 LTS upgrade those versions?

newbie-user
April 27th, 2012, 08:04 PM
I've seen a few constructive suggestions. Thank you folks!

But a couple of basic questions ...

1. Can anyone tell me if Ubuntu/Canonical plan to continue to provide the GNome shell as an option in the long-term? THAT is one of the fears of our clients.

2. We're looking for ways to upgrade 100's of systems running 9.04 LTS and 10.04 LTS. Is there any way to install the GNome shell the first time, as opposed to it being a separate manual operation?

3. From a different perspective - would a Xubuntu 12.04 LTS upgrade those versions?

Have a look at pre-seeding. You can automate your installations and choose which additional packages you want installed, such as gnome-fallback. Also, it would be helpful to create a local PXE/Repository server so that your installs/updates will go much faster. All you have to do is turn on the computer and tell it to boot to lan.

Are you planning to do clean installs or upgrades?

fillmont
April 27th, 2012, 08:06 PM
I've seen a few constructive suggestions. Thank you folks!

But a couple of basic questions ...

1. Can anyone tell me if Ubuntu/Canonical plan to continue to provide the GNome shell as an option in the long-term? THAT is one of the fears of our clients.

Have you actually tried Gnome Shell? If your users hate Unity, I don't see why they would like Gnome Shell any better.

I think what you mean is Gnome Fallback (which mimics the old-school Gnome 2 layout). Either way, both Gnome Shell and Gnome Fallback are in the repositories and will be supported (since they are all variations of Gnome 3 anyway)


2. We're looking for ways to upgrade 100's of systems running 9.04 LTS and 10.04 LTS. Is there any way to install the GNome shell the first time, as opposed to it being a separate manual operation?

I'm not sure, but as has been pointed out in this thread, the secondary step (installing Gnome Fallback) is ridiculously easy to do.


3. From a different perspective - would a Xubuntu 12.04 LTS upgrade those versions?

Again, the solution here would be to upgrade to 12.04 (since all Ubuntus have the same underpinnings) and then just install the Xubuntu desktop - which, again, is very easy to do.

KiwiNZ
April 27th, 2012, 08:07 PM
I've seen a few constructive suggestions. Thank you folks!

But a couple of basic questions ...

1. Can anyone tell me if Ubuntu/Canonical plan to continue to provide the GNome shell as an option in the long-term? THAT is one of the fears of our clients.

2. We're looking for ways to upgrade 100's of systems running 9.04 LTS and 10.04 LTS. Is there any way to install the GNome shell the first time, as opposed to it being a separate manual operation?

3. From a different perspective - would a Xubuntu 12.04 LTS upgrade those versions?

Hundreds of systems?

Based on discussion here and only a few days after release, hmmmmmmm

rockney
April 27th, 2012, 08:08 PM
Then, vendor, you should have known what you were selling. You should have been familiar with both your product and your customer base.

A car salesman who is unaware that the model of car he is selling comes with both a 4 cylinder and 6 cylinder option cuts his own throat. The Gnome developers stopped producing GNOME II. It was no longer an option. It was not a business decision by Canonical.

Still, no mercy from me.

Don't blame Canonical for the fact that you didn't know your product line.

Ya right - using what crystal ball to see where Ubuntu was going 8 years ago?

I DO blame Canonical for trying to shove such a radical user interface change down users throats. THAT'S why our clients didn't go to 11.x. And hand-tweaking 100's of systems is not viable.

haqking
April 27th, 2012, 08:09 PM
Ya right - using what crystal ball to see where Ubuntu was going 8 years ago?

I DO blame Canonical for trying to shove such a radical user interface change down users throats. THAT'S why our clients didn't go to 11.x. And hand-tweaking 100's of systems is not viable.

have you read any of the above posts.

Its not forced, default does not mean forced.

Any other OS has a default interface.

read above ^

In the time it took you to make the OP you could have installed 15 different DE onto the machines ;-)

Peace

newbie-user
April 27th, 2012, 08:10 PM
Ya right - using what crystal ball to see where Ubuntu was going 8 years ago?

I DO blame Canonical for trying to shove such a radical user interface change down users throats. THAT'S why our clients didn't go to 11.x. And hand-tweaking 100's of systems is not viable.

I would hold off on upgrading to 12.04 until it's been out for a while. 10.04 is still good for another year.

rockney
April 27th, 2012, 08:11 PM
So, you arent happy with unity, try another DE. If you're mad at ubuntu for implementing unity then at least be appreciative that it isn't gnome-shell, which is cool looking for 5 minutes then annoying forever (personal opinion).

As a business software vendor what on earth are you doing putting your clients on an OS that you aren't completely happy with? Fedora no longer uses standard gnome, nor does any modern distro that I'm aware of, the closest to that oldskool gnome desktop you're going to get is Mint which is based on Ubuntu. All of my customers seem to be pleased with Unity (retraining is a breeze so far) and if they aren't pleased I get them into a different DE. LXDE is very similar to what your clients are used to. Blame gnome for abandoning gnome 2, blame yourself for not rolling with the changes, but thank Ubuntu for being there for you and your clients throughout it all.

They switched away from Redhat when it went commercial. Ubuntu LTS was the best around at the time.

josephmills
April 27th, 2012, 08:11 PM
There is 3 things that I have to say about this
what are you doing installing software ?

WHY ?

:!: puppet
:!: chef
:!: juju

malangaman
April 27th, 2012, 08:12 PM
Why do you think that Lucid 10.04 is getting old? It runs like a youngster on my machines. It will continue to receive support for some time to come.(16 months on desktop 28 months on servers). I figure when the time comes all significant issues will be worked out of it and it may continue to serve indefinitely.
Consumerism is so pervasive that many of us think that newer is always better. Not so. We are not obligated to change operating systems in order to remain fashionable.
I say if it does the job stick with it until it doesn't. I achieve great productivity with Lucid 10.04 and see no reason to experience Unity or anything similar.

Version Dependency
April 27th, 2012, 08:12 PM
In the time it took you to make the OP you could have installed 15 different DE onto the machines ;-)


In the time spent on all his posts in this thread, he could installed Gnome Fallback on 50 machines...and that's if he actually had to go to each machine and type the terminal command for each individual machine himself. I fail to see how this is such a hassle.

haqking
April 27th, 2012, 08:14 PM
Next time Mark comes round your place of business with his gun and forces you to upgrade your systems to a different version and forces you to use Unity, ask him for one last wish and then say

can you show me how apt-get works before you go.

Thanks

newbie-user
April 27th, 2012, 08:14 PM
Why do you think that Lucid 10.04 is getting old? It runs like a youngster on my machines. It will continue to receive support for some time to come.(16 months on desktop 28 months on servers). I figure when the time comes all significant issues will be worked out of it and it may continue to serve indefinitely.
Consumerism is so pervasive that many of us think that newer is always better. Not so. We are not obligated to change operating systems in order to remain fashionable.
I say if it does the job stick with it until it doesn't. I achieve great productivity with Lucid 10.04 and see no reason to experience Unity or anything similar.

Just nitpicking here. 10.04 is LTS so it's good for 3years on the desktop, 5 on the server. 12.04 LTS will be 5 years desktop and 5 years server.

QIII
April 27th, 2012, 08:15 PM
Despite the fact that, as a consultant, I would be ashamed (and probably selling pencils thereafter) to have foisted that on my clients without forethought, I will be nice in this post:

Try Xubuntu, Lubuntu or one of the current varieties of GNOME.

Kubuntu could be an option, but its future is uncertain.

You might even get something set up for each of those with pre-configurations and make your own spin.

Test out several options.


My opinion: There is nothing inherently wrong with Unity. It is, however, a great departure from the established desktop experience, which is certainly not the sort of thing I would suggest as a suitable solution in the enterprise. Bad move.

|{urse
April 27th, 2012, 08:16 PM
They switched away from Redhat when it went commercial. Ubuntu LTS was the best around at the time.

It still is, have a look at Gnome Fallback or LXDE as mentioned repeatedly.

http://www.liberiangeek.net/2011/08/return-to-ubuntu-classic-desktop-in-ubuntu-11-10/

QIII
April 27th, 2012, 08:17 PM
I DO blame Canonical for trying to shove such a radical user interface change down users throats. THAT'S why our clients didn't go to 11.x. And hand-tweaking 100's of systems is not viable.

Canonical forced nothing on anyone. They changed a default. That is all they did.

As a vendor, you should know that defaults can be changed.

I don't use the default. Unity is not suitable for my needs or my personal aesthetic sensibilities. I started out with something else because it was available and I knew that.

KiwiNZ
April 27th, 2012, 08:22 PM
With respect to the OP, I am struggling to equate this thread to an experienced, Account Manager, Product Specialist, Systems Integrator, Support Consultant, Systems Administrator, 1st level support in that descending order involved with hundreds of Corporate systems.

Elfy
April 27th, 2012, 08:25 PM
Closed - this is going nowhere.