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KL_72_TR
April 7th, 2012, 05:32 PM
I came across this article:
http://www.businessinsider.com/mark-shuttleworth-turning-ubuntu-into-the-next-apple-2012-4
I don't know what to do.
Should I laugh, should I cry or should I go out with my friends?

iponeverything
April 7th, 2012, 05:45 PM
I came across this article:
http://www.businessinsider.com/mark-shuttleworth-turning-ubuntu-into-the-next-apple-2012-4
I don't know what to do.
Should I laugh, should I cry or should I go out with my friends?

go out with your friends --

The cool thing about linux is that it not a top-down business -- it is bottom up philosophy. It owes its existence and survival to its usefulness.

fatality_uk
April 7th, 2012, 06:12 PM
Save me from another "my vision of Linux is better than everyone else's" article!!

winh8r
April 7th, 2012, 06:25 PM
I think there is a chance he will see this through , but there will have to

be some serious rethinking done with regard to attracting a new userbase

and also to retaining them.

Brand loyalty does not just happen, it needs to be built. Then it needs to

be maintained.

Mars11
April 7th, 2012, 06:27 PM
There's a good and a bad thing about becoming popular. Good: More apps. Bad: Viruses.

SemiExpert
April 7th, 2012, 06:28 PM
I don't object to Red Hat's subscription based business model, although I find Red Hat, and the many Red Hat clones, to be too enterprise oriented to be of any great use to me. As much as I admire the business acumen of Red Hat, I have no desire to enter the .rpm communtiy. As far as comparing Canonical to Apple, it's worth remembering that Apple is first and foremost a hardware company. People buy an i- prefixed device for the quality touchscreen interface, not just for iOS, and Macbooks continue to gain marketshare because of the unparalleled hardware integration, not because of system specs or because OS X has a cutting edge GUI, because it doesn't.

Basher101
April 7th, 2012, 06:28 PM
There's a good and a bad thing about becoming popular. Good: More apps. Bad: Viruses.
this^

SemiExpert
April 7th, 2012, 06:30 PM
There's a good and a bad thing about becoming popular. Good: More apps. Bad: Viruses.

Apple's current woes have more to do with large numbers of users who are running unsupported operating systems, without simple precautions. The popularity of OS X is not the problem.

KL_72_TR
April 7th, 2012, 06:45 PM
I was thinking about this: Is this truly coming from Mark Shuttleworth or is she making ideas?
If Canonical want to be competitive with other Linux companies or even with others, for me this is not a bad thing. But copy someone or something...

BertN45
April 7th, 2012, 06:47 PM
Well the man has a vision and works hard to reach his goals. The author of the article tries to ridicule it.
Many people like Unity and it is a great contribution to the Linux community and many more goodies are in the pipe line. Let's enjoy that.

bouncingwilf
April 7th, 2012, 06:58 PM
An apple "clone" without being mugged and then handcuffed could be attractive to quite a broad audience - sadly not me if it involves unity but what the hell we're all different!

Bouncingwilf

Paqman
April 7th, 2012, 07:05 PM
He should be flattered. Being compared to Apple is the standard benchmark of success for lazy tech journalists.

QIII
April 7th, 2012, 07:08 PM
Good.

So long as hardware is not dictated and software does not have to be pre-approved.

synaptix
April 7th, 2012, 07:40 PM
He should be flattered. Being compared to Apple is the standard benchmark of success for lazy tech journalists.

I would hate to be compared to Apple.

exploder
April 7th, 2012, 07:40 PM
I think Mark Shuttleworth is doing a great job making Linux more popular. Unity is looking very good for the upcoming LTS release and many that did not originally like Unity are finding they like it at this point in time. New ideas are going into Unity and no one can really conceive it as a clone of anything else now.

Mark Shuttleworth is not putting all his eggs in one basket either. Using Unity on an array of devices like TVs, Tablets and phones is a very smart business move. Offering paid apps in the software center is also turning out to be a brilliant idea as well. I see more and more games, magazines, etc being offered for very reasonable prices.

Ubuntu 12.04 is looking very good and the hardware support is especially good right now. 12.04 runs on every computer I have regardless of the hardware configuration, it has been a long time since I could say that!

Ubuntu One is an awesome feature and 5 GB of space is pretty generous! The idea of Lenses and Scopes is a brilliant idea too and just the naming convention is a good marketing idea.

5 years of support for the LTS release makes Ubuntu a much more attractive choice for Businesses and the average user too. I think Ubuntu is on the right track now to be successful as a main stream choice now. I have seen some of the things that are in store for future releases of Unity and it is really going to stand out and possibly lead the pack as far as innovation goes.

Mark Shuttleworth is modeling Canonical as a business a bit like Apple as far as being diversified and that really is the way to go with the global economy being what it is right now but keep in mind the Ubuntu is free and always will be. I can honestly see Canonical being a very profitable business in the very near future.

BigSilly
April 7th, 2012, 07:45 PM
I think Mark Shuttleworth is doing a great job making Linux more popular.

You obviously missed this wee snippet of fun (http://dissociatedpress.net/2012/03/27/ubuntu-were-not-linux/). :D

exploder
April 7th, 2012, 08:04 PM
The word Linux scares off a lot of potential new users. Too many people still think Linux is like rocket science and you have to know all kinds of commands to use it.

That article has a lot of misinformation in it. Ubuntu does contribute much more than most people realize. The author of the article seems pretty biased too.

KiwiNZ
April 7th, 2012, 08:09 PM
You obviously missed this wee snippet of fun (http://dissociatedpress.net/2012/03/27/ubuntu-were-not-linux/). :D


Another example pseudo journalism. A storm in a geeks bath water.

Bandit
April 7th, 2012, 08:43 PM
I can see his vision as a turn in the right direction, but Apple Mac is more then just a PC with OSX on them. They build their OS around hardware compatibility and/or hardware around OS restraints. Unless Canonical wants to start building custom PCs, which is were seems Apple makes most its money from in Mac sales. On the same note, unless he can get more software companies to build popular commercial software and games for Ubuntu Linux, I dont see him for filling his goal..

dniMretsaM
April 7th, 2012, 08:49 PM
Why exactly does the article imply that Ubuntu copied U1 syncing from iCloud? U1 had syncing capabilities long before iCloud was around.


You obviously missed this wee snippet of fun (http://dissociatedpress.net/2012/03/27/ubuntu-were-not-linux/). :D

I don't understand why this matters. You don't see Apple touting iOS as Darwin, do you? The "L word" does tend to scare some people away. I actually think not having "Linux" plastered all over their Web page is a good thing in regards to noob-friendlyness.

synaptix
April 7th, 2012, 08:52 PM
Why exactly does the article imply that Ubuntu copied U1 syncing from iCloud?

I have to agree with one of the comments on the article there, it seems the writer doesn't know what the hell she is talking about and just vomited out an article of nonsense for the sake of publicity.

alexfish
April 7th, 2012, 09:11 PM
You obviously missed this wee snippet of fun (http://dissociatedpress.net/2012/03/27/ubuntu-were-not-linux/). :D
not in terms of pseudo

main stream is contributing more and more to this Linux Kernel

With next event horizon of UEFI

Distributors and Vendors of Linux based OS's have to make rational choices

The choices have to be now , those that don't will fall by the way side

The main stream contributors to the kernel are helping in that direction , RE first line

For me , still suspect someone's motivation in contributing to this Kernel.

Paqman
April 7th, 2012, 09:23 PM
which is were seems Apple makes most its money from in Mac sales.

Slightly OT, but;

Apparently not any more. Mac sales (I'm told) make up a small and diminishing share of their income. These days it's all about the Iphone/Ipad and Itunes. I think they'll keep making Macs, but they're not the company's main focus any more.

And staggering back to the topic;

Your point stands though, Apple and Canonical are fundamentally different operations. Hence why I described it as a very lazy and superficial comparison. Just because they have a couple of similar products doesn't mean jack, really.

MisterGaribaldi
April 7th, 2012, 10:46 PM
It appears Mark is even trying to subtly copy Steve's appearance. To wit:

http://static5.businessinsider.com/image/4f7e2b7b69bedd672500001b/mark-shuttleworth.jpg http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-L9jeNNLQWcQ/TxVnbxlZIbI/AAAAAAAAAeo/a53SjlwFl7Q/s1600/IPKat%2B10%2Bsteve%2Bjobs.jpg

I'm not suggesting it's a perfectly like-for-like outright copy of his style, but there are some similarities.

And, may it come as no surprise to anyone here that I feel someone has to grab the Linux movement by the nose and drag it along in some form or fashion, but there needs to be some centralized leadership here, and it seems Canonical is going to be the one to do it.

This doesn't mean I approve of Mark not having Canonical upstream all of their ideas, patches, etc. (excluding those things which are technically proprietary). Actually, I agree with the comments in that article which state Mark had d**ned well better start focusing on getting more and better apps available if Linux (which still includes Ubuntu, even if they are hesitant to admit it) is to ever gain traction and credibility out there in the world.

And no, I don't want to hear about how "we don't care who uses Linux as long as it keeps working for us" any more than I want to hear people bleating on about how we have "great" alternatives already. We don't, ok? And for Linux to win, it *has* to gain more marketshare, and that won't happen if you can't get any app you want for Linux, or "no-duh" equivalent apps exist that there's no reason any person (pro included) couldn't switch to.

I think, however, that Linux is going to have a helluva time matching Apple for media and creative pro apps, and likewise it's gonna have a double helluva time matching Microsoft for business-and-productivity apps and games. It can be done, though it should have been pushed REALLY FREAKING HARD many years ago, but unless someone's out there leading the charge and getting it done, Linux is toast (except for servers and embedded products).

EDIT: Oh, and another thing about the similarities. Just look at how similar Unity, et al, is to iOS in style and coloring, etc. If that isn't deliberate, it's the wildest co-incidence I've seen in a while. (This doesn't even begin to address Gnome's traditional similarity to Mac OS/Mac OS X's Finder, but that's not a *Canonical* thing.)

mustang
April 7th, 2012, 11:17 PM
This is a pretty bad article. Not sure the author really knows what they are talking about or has any sort of tech background. The analogy to Apple is probably there to provoke curious readers (like me); the analysis of the analogy itself is pretty weak.

Paqman
April 7th, 2012, 11:19 PM
And for Linux to win, it *has* to gain more marketshare

Not necessarily. The desktop market ain't going to go Linux: we lost, Windows won years ago. Linux needs to stay agile and go after the emerging markets as they come. Android on smartphones and to a lesser extent tablets is doing it right now, and kicking butt. There are other markets that will open up, I think there's a lot of growth in home servers to come. The current NAS boxes all run Linux, but I think more flexible and capable machines will come.

Chasing traditional desktop market share is a waste of time IMO. Dislodging the entrenched Windows ecosystem is way, way too hard. Linux will survive by being the first into new classes of device. It's got to be done right though, just look at how badly we got pounded on netbooks, and there were plenty of Linux smartphone false starts before Android struck gold.

Bandit
April 8th, 2012, 01:29 AM
Slightly OT, but;

Apparently not any more. Mac sales (I'm told) make up a small and diminishing share of their income. These days it's all about the Iphone/Ipad and Itunes. I think they'll keep making Macs, but they're not the company's main focus any more.

And staggering back to the topic;

Your point stands though, Apple and Canonical are fundamentally different operations. Hence why I described it as a very lazy and superficial comparison. Just because they have a couple of similar products doesn't mean jack, really.

My bad :) .. I may not have sounded clear, but I was referring only to their PC sales as they dont make a lot of selling OSX since it only runs on their hardware.. But in regards to over all company sales, the iCrap line they got is making them a hefty some, far more then they ever did off PCs.
But then again thats another thing that sets Canonical appart from ever being like Apple.

synaptix
April 9th, 2012, 12:42 AM
Chasing traditional desktop market share is a waste of time IMO. Dislodging the entrenched Windows ecosystem is way, way too hard.

But just imagine the history books telling tales of how Linux overcame Windows in the desktop market share...it would be glorious.