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Dngrsone
April 7th, 2012, 04:20 AM
As noted in the subject line, I have an HP G72-259WM with dual Pentium T4500 and 8GB RAM. I am currently running 10.04-desktop-AMD64.

So, do I run 12.04-desktop-AMD64 or would I be better served using 12.04-desktop-i386?

If the latter, then is there anything special I will have to do with my data when importing from the 10.04 64-bit desktop?

SemiExpert
April 7th, 2012, 04:39 AM
As noted in the subject line, I have an HP G72-259WM with dual Pentium T4500 and 8GB RAM. I am currently running 10.04-desktop-AMD64.

So, do I run 12.04-desktop-AMD64 or would I be better served using 12.04-desktop-i386?

If the latter, then is there anything special I will have to do with my data when importing from the 10.04 64-bit desktop?

Ubuntu is finally going to make 64-bit 12.04 the recommended version. I'd advise running a Live Disc or trying 12.04 with Unetbootin.

mcellius
April 7th, 2012, 04:44 AM
Several weeks ago Phoronix ran a comparison between 32-bit and 64-bit versions of Ubuntu, and found that the 64-bit performance was better. Since your computer is capable of running the 64-bit, I suggest you do it.

When I first installed Ubuntu 11.04, I tried both and found that the 64-bit seemed slightly faster on my system, but I also found that I ran into no conflicts or problems at all. These days, 64-bit is very stable, runs everything, and will make better use of your system's resources. If you can run it, there is no reason not to do so.

Dngrsone
April 7th, 2012, 04:45 AM
Thanks.

I was planning on running from the CD for a little while, at least, eventually installing to a new set of partitions (preserving my current 10.04 install).

mcellius
April 7th, 2012, 05:01 AM
That sounds very reasonable. In my case, I wanted to run 12.04 from a partition so I created one for it and installed it next to my 11.10 installation, and just dual-boot into whichever I want to run. (These days it's almost always 12.04, as it's stable enough for me to do everything on it; your mileage may vary.)

I wanted to change icons, backgrounds, themes, etc., to test its response to customization, so I really needed a hard-drive installation. I also wanted to be able to stay up-to-date with bug fixess and updates, for which a hard drive installation was also necessary. Otherwise, there's no problem running it from a liveCD.

Dngrsone
April 8th, 2012, 01:46 AM
Dang! I managed to paint myself into a corner here-- I have the free space to install 12.04 in, but no free primary partitions...

Am I going to break 10.04 if I delete SDA3, make it an extended partition and then recreate swap?

I know I will have to unmount the swap file; then what, reidentify the new swap partition in fstab?

cariboo907
April 8th, 2012, 03:20 AM
You don't need to install Ubuntu on a primary partition, just use a logical partition. You also don't need to create a new swap partition, as Ubuntu is more than happy to share a swap partition with other installations. This is what my partitions look like on this system:


sudo fdisk -l
[sudo] password for cariboo:

Disk /dev/sda: 160.0 GB, 160041885696 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 19457 cylinders, total 312581808 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00088c37

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sda1 * 2048 19531775 9764864 83 Linux
/dev/sda2 19533822 23437311 1951745 5 Extended
/dev/sda3 23437312 117186559 46874624 83 Linux
/dev/sda4 117186560 312580095 97696768 83 Linux
/dev/sda5 19533824 23437311 1951744 82 Linux swap / Solaris

On this system, dev/sda1 is / /dev/sda3 is /home on my Ubuntu install, /dev/sda4 is an Xubuntu install, with dev/sda5 a shared swap partition for both installs. The partitioning scheme isn't what I'd do if I set the partitions up myself, but both installs where done for iso testing.

This is my netbook, which very rarely sees an installetion that lasts all the way through a development cycle.

Dngrsone
April 8th, 2012, 06:25 AM
The problem is, I have to kill SDA3, which is the swap, absorb the unassigned space and turn SDA3 into an extended partition.

Then I can create the swap again, as say SDA9.

Meanwhile, I have to figure out what I have to do to keep my existing 10.04 installation from blowing up because the swap that used to be SDA3 is now SDA9.

xyzzyman
April 8th, 2012, 08:01 AM
You'll just have to edit your fstab to point to sda9 for swap, and possibly run mkswap.

If you really did upgrade that unit to 8GB of RAM, you probably aren't ever going to touch swap anyways unless you use the hibernation feature. Being just a T4500 I can't see you doing anything super intensive that would also be RAM hungry.

Dngrsone
April 8th, 2012, 12:41 PM
You'll just have to edit your fstab to point to sda9 for swap, and possibly run mkswap.

If you really did upgrade that unit to 8GB of RAM, you probably aren't ever going to touch swap anyways unless you use the hibernation feature. Being just a T4500 I can't see you doing anything super intensive that would also be RAM hungry.

True, and the only reason I have 8GB of swap is because of the occasional hibernation, though Ubuntu doesn't handle that well, anyway.

You'd think I'd be able to do almost anything with this pig, but Minecraft lags heavy and for some reason OOo Base takes forever to load even a modest, 35 record database...

So, anyway, I guess I will move my latest backup to the LAN drive and reallocate that partition later.

xyzzyman
April 8th, 2012, 07:11 PM
True, and the only reason I have 8GB of swap is because of the occasional hibernation, though Ubuntu doesn't handle that well, anyway.

You'd think I'd be able to do almost anything with this pig, but Minecraft lags heavy and for some reason OOo Base takes forever to load even a modest, 35 record database...

So, anyway, I guess I will move my latest backup to the LAN drive and reallocate that partition later.

That's just a T4500 Pentium with integrated graphics, and probably the slowest hard drive that HP could throw in it so I'm not surprised. Usually the Walmart specific models are like that.

Dngrsone
April 9th, 2012, 04:26 AM
Well, I managed to repartition the drive... I had to expand SDA4 to encompass the free space because gparted wouldn't let me make SDA3 an extended partition... and what's with the little 1MB blocks of unallocated space gparted drops?

... anyway, 12.04 is on, and now I get two separate grub boots, and I think Win 7 is broken...

Ah, the joy of installing new Operating systems... http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee303/Dngrs_1/rolleyes.gif