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View Full Version : The release schedule has no RC. But you never know.



philinux
March 29th, 2012, 09:52 PM
What's the feelings that we might get an RC?

OrangeCrate
March 29th, 2012, 11:31 PM
I don't see a particular advantage to adding an RC to the mix. Whether there is one, or not, it won't make much difference. As with previous releases, the final will show up on time, warts and all, and there will be a flurry of updates shortly after release to catch up on unfinished business.

fjgaude
March 29th, 2012, 11:38 PM
The whole idea of an Alpha and Beta session for software started in the 60s with IBM.

The Alpha was always for in-house testing; Beta, for special customers. Release, after first Beta and then Alpha, was for everybody who wishes to buy the software.

Beta for us should simply be next to release.

cariboo907
March 30th, 2012, 12:58 AM
We haven't had an RC release for at least the last couple of releases.

jbicha
March 31st, 2012, 05:01 AM
If it's not on the release schedule, it's not happening.

Preparing an RC image uses a lot of time & energy that is better spent on testing & preparing the final release image.

shuttleworthwannabe
March 31st, 2012, 05:27 AM
Is it fair to say that all development is not complete until 12.04.1 LTS is released? This should take care of all kinks during and after official release of 12.04 LTS--right?

1clue
March 31st, 2012, 05:53 AM
I'm not sure exactly how it works with Ubuntu, but with the software I work on an RC is indispensable.

Looking at the comments on this thread so far, I believe that either Ubuntu works differently than what I'm used to or some of the posters here don't know how it's supposed to work.

Having a development cycle is critical. As the product approaches a production release the nature of the commits allowed changes from adding features to fixing bugs. Traditionally, having an RC release means that at that point only bug fixes are allowed.

ubuntu27
March 31st, 2012, 07:02 AM
https://wiki.ubuntu.com/PrecisePangolin/ReleaseSchedule

dcstar
March 31st, 2012, 07:16 AM
Is it fair to say that all development is not complete until 12.04.1 LTS is released? This should take care of all kinks during and after official release of 12.04 LTS--right?

Define "development"......

Every single Ubuntu release I have experienced (since 4.10, so that basically means all of them) had had masses of updates fixing bugs in the weeks following the "Official" release date, so I contend that "Development" continues way past the official release and a RC candidate release is only just another snapshot of the evolving development of the release.

An RC release date may have a purpose in focussing the developers in getting some things fixed by a deadline, but the reality seems to be that the scope of the project is so large these days that you might as well be herding cats than trying to get everything basically ready for a RC.

shuttleworthwannabe
March 31st, 2012, 09:41 AM
Define "development"......

Every single Ubuntu release I have experienced (since 4.10, so that basically means all of them) had had masses of updates fixing bugs in the weeks following the "Official" release date, so I contend that "Development" continues way past the official release and a RC candidate release is only just another snapshot of the evolving development of the release.

An RC release date may have a purpose in focussing the developers in getting some things fixed by a deadline, but the reality seems to be that the scope of the project is so large these days that you might as well be herding cats than trying to get everything basically ready for a RC.

That was exactly my understanding of "development"--it is in continuous development; but milestones achieved are safe bet to ensure major bug fixes are taken care of.

matt2053
March 31st, 2012, 02:12 PM
I'm not sure exactly how it works with Ubuntu, but with the software I work on an RC is indispensable.

Looking at the comments on this thread so far, I believe that either Ubuntu works differently than what I'm used to or some of the posters here don't know how it's supposed to work.

Having a development cycle is critical. As the product approaches a production release the nature of the commits allowed changes from adding features to fixing bugs. Traditionally, having an RC release means that at that point only bug fixes are allowed.

Different development teams work differently, and use different labels. Really the labels are arbitrary anyway. Some teams call them Alpha, Beta, Release. Some call them Development Builds, Release Candidates, and Stable Releases.

Canonical has in my opinion one of the coolest and best development cycles I've ever seen in the software world.

jbicha
March 31st, 2012, 03:19 PM
A problem with adding another RC just before the final release is that development already completely freezes the final week except for absolutely critical bugfixes. Extending that one more week doesn't make Ubuntu better and uses quite a bit of the limited developer time and resources. There's only 25ish weeks in a release cycle. Feature freeze was a month ago so we're already in bugfix month mode anyway. Would you rather have an extra week of bugfixes, or an extra tested ISO that will be obsolete a week or so later?

The ISO testers here can tell you that doing an ISO release is a whole lot of work and they wouldn't want to do that work unless it were needed.

philinux
March 31st, 2012, 03:35 PM
A problem with adding another RC just before the final release is that development already completely freezes the final week except for absolutely critical bugfixes. Extending that one more week doesn't make Ubuntu better and uses quite a bit of the limited developer time and resources. There's only 25ish weeks in a release cycle. Feature freeze was a month ago so we're already in bugfix month mode anyway. Would you rather have an extra week of bugfixes, or an extra tested ISO that will be obsolete a week or so later?

The ISO testers here can tell you that doing an ISO release is a whole lot of work and they wouldn't want to do that work unless it were needed.

Doh ! I'd forgot to give this link which is why I posted in the first place. Is this guy making things up out of thin air?

http://iloveubuntu.net/ubuntu-1204-lts-beta-2-released


The BETA 2 is the last official release in the Precise development cycle, although release candidates are to probably land in the "open" for final testing days before the final release.

Elfy
March 31st, 2012, 03:40 PM
Is this guy making things up out of thin air?
Looks like it :)

jbicha
March 31st, 2012, 07:50 PM
iloveubuntu.net is not particularly reliable. It's more of a fan blog that apparently doesn't try to verify stories.

I read it (partially to see what stories are wrong and partly to read the occasional unique news items there), but be skeptical of claims you haven't seen referenced anywhere more officially.

philinux
April 1st, 2012, 02:02 PM
iloveubuntu.net is not particularly reliable. It's more of a fan blog that apparently doesn't try to verify stories.

I read it (partially to see what stories are wrong and partly to read the occasional unique news items there), but be skeptical of claims you haven't seen referenced anywhere more officially.

Yes indeed. I was sceptical that's why I posted here.

ubuntu27
April 2nd, 2012, 06:15 AM
I still like iloveubuntu.net since their blog gets updated much more frequently than others. And sometimes they bring a news post with great detail.

kubulai
April 21st, 2012, 12:33 PM
Thank-you! Be nice if there was a link to the release schedule from the main page http://ubuntu.com.


https://wiki.ubuntu.com/PrecisePangolin/ReleaseSchedule

grahammechanical
April 21st, 2012, 12:52 PM
Did we notice from the release schedule that in the week before final release there is something called Candidate Window Starts?

That link says this?


From this point in time, any image produced could be the one we release as the final image.

All images in this interval should have 100% mandatory test case coverage as specified on the ISO tracker, or issues agreed as OK to release note by the release team.

The images being ISO tested now are the release candidates, the candidate images for final release.

Here is the schedule for Q (12.10)

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/QReleaseSchedule

Notice the week beginning October 11th.

I also notice that 12.04 has 28 weeks development, 12.10 has 25 weeks and 13.04 27 weeks development. So, that varies.

Regards.

pqwoerituytrueiwoq
April 21st, 2012, 05:51 PM
technically we have been using a RC since the 19th

Release candidate

A release candidate (RC) is a beta version with potential to be a final product, which is ready to release unless significant bugs (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_bug) emerge. In this stage of product stabilization, all product features have been designed, coded and tested through one or more beta cycles with no known showstopper-class bug.
A release is called code complete when the development team agrees that no entirely new source code will be added to this release. There may still be source code changes to fix defects, and changes to documentation and data files, and to the code for test cases or utilities.

http://i.imgur.com/cS3Ll.png (https://wiki.ubuntu.com/CandidateWindowStarts)
Picture is linked to a very relevant page