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rk0r
March 23rd, 2012, 12:36 PM
What flavours of linux are you using alongside Ubuntu?

Over the years i have used a number of Distro’s one that stuck out in my head was Linux Mepis due to its great connectivity and ease of use. I am thinking of installing another Distro up pretty soon for testing but i am uncertain what one to go for.. there are so many!?.

snowpine
March 23rd, 2012, 12:38 PM
Mepis is a nice one!

I am currently test-driving Fuduntu. If you've never used a .rpm (red hat family) distro before, it is a fairly painless introduction. :)

Dry Lips
March 23rd, 2012, 12:40 PM
I've tried many different distros briefly. The ones that I have installed alongside Ubuntu, are a couple of Mints plus Kubuntu. And I've got Chakra installed on a hdd that I use with another computer.

rk0r
March 23rd, 2012, 01:35 PM
Mepis is a nice one!

I am currently test-driving Fuduntu. If you've never used a .rpm (red hat family) distro before, it is a fairly painless introduction. :)

Do you find that Fuduntu is running better than Ubuntu / ease of use ? i have never tried fedora before.

snowpine
March 23rd, 2012, 01:57 PM
Do you find that Fuduntu is running better than Ubuntu / ease of use ? i have never tried fedora before.

I couldn't tell you; I haven't used Ubuntu since 9.04. ;) I much prefer the .rpm family (red hat, centos, fedora, fuduntu) way of doing things.

I switched to Fuduntu from Fedora because Fedora went to Gnome 3. If you like Gnome 3 then Fedora is a good choice; if you prefer Gnome 2 then Fuduntu is for you. :)

VTPoet
March 23rd, 2012, 02:02 PM
I much prefer the .rpm family (red hat, centos, fedora, fuduntu) way of doing things.

That's interesting. What is it you prefer? The package management?

snowpine
March 23rd, 2012, 02:10 PM
That's interesting. What is it you prefer? The package management?

Not sure I can articulate it. Something about the engineering. Sort of like how some people prefer to drive German/American/Japanese cars.

Sometimes I feel like Ubuntu is designed by arrogant nerds for the projected needs of the imaginary non-nerds of tomorrow, whereas Red Hat is designed by arrogant nerds for the immediate needs of the arrogant nerds of today.

ps I am an arrogant nerd. ;)

kurt18947
March 23rd, 2012, 02:10 PM
I'd recommend PCLinuxOS for a change. I haven't tried the KDE flavor, didn't care for the Xfce flavor but LXDE worked well, I thought. PcLinuxOS is as light as Lubuntu it seems and uses .rpm packages but uses Synaptic to manage them so that's familiar. I had a little issue with installing printers but the problem was a missing package in the default install.

BrokenKingpin
March 23rd, 2012, 02:15 PM
I have been a Linux user for about a decade, and I have used about every major distribution in that time, and countless smaller ones. Recently though I have been bouncing around the various Ubuntu derivatives, finally landing on Xubuntu (which is on all my machines currently).

I have been thinking about going back to Debian though, on the testing branch. The rolling nature of Debian Testing appeals to me. The only thing really holding me back is that getting a Debian desktop up takes a lot more time than it does with Ubuntu, especially when it comes to proprietary software. The main benefit would be that I would not have to re-install or upgrade every 6 months to get the latest software.

I have also considered openSUSE with the Tumbleweed repos enabled to make it a rolling distro, but this does not work with NVidia graphics drivers, which makes it useless to me. I don't really get this, can they not just update the Nvidia drivers when they update the kernel? Other rolling distros seems to get around this issue I think (such as Debian Testing).

Either way, I am happy on Xubuntu, I just hate reloading my machines every 6 months.

snowpine
March 23rd, 2012, 02:21 PM
I have been thinking about going back to Debian though, on the testing branch. The rolling nature of Debian Testing appeals to me. The only thing really holding me back is that getting a Debian desktop up takes a lot more time than it does with Ubuntu, especially when it comes to proprietary software. The main benefit would be that I would not have to re-install or upgrade every 6 months to get the latest software.

Debian Testing has little to offer an Ubuntu user, in my experience/opinion. The packages are no newer (sometimes even a little older), and the chance of breakage is higher.

I know people around here are probably sick of hearing it, but the best rolling release distro really is Arch. :)

rk0r
March 23rd, 2012, 02:32 PM
Debian Testing has little to offer an Ubuntu user, in my experience/opinion. The packages are no newer (sometimes even a little older), and the chance of breakage is higher.

I know people around here are probably sick of hearing it, but the best rolling release distro really is Arch. :)

Strange you mention ARCH as i have just been reading about it.. i may download this over the weekend for a play. Is the Unity dektop only available to Ubuntu ?

snowpine
March 23rd, 2012, 02:37 PM
Strange you mention ARCH as i have just been reading about it.. i may download this over the weekend for a play. Is the Unity dektop only available to Ubuntu ?

Questions Arch can be answered by the almighty Arch Wiki:

https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Unity

Based on that, I'd stay, Stick with Ubuntu if Unity is your desktop environment of choice.

Arch is not a "download and take it for a spin over the weekend" type of distro. :) Installing it will take you a day or 2 working carefully step-by-step from this guide: https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Beginners%27_Guide

ratcheer
March 23rd, 2012, 02:46 PM
What flavours of linux are you using alongside Ubuntu?



Right now, I am running Ububtu 11.10 and 12.04, Arch Linux, and Sabayon Linux. Ubuntu 11.10 is still my main system, though.

Tim

ratcheer
March 23rd, 2012, 02:49 PM
Arch is not a "download and take it for a spin over the weekend" type of distro. :)

However, you can do that with ArchBang. http://archbang.org/

Tim

keithpeter
March 23rd, 2012, 02:56 PM
Hello All

I use PUIAS Linux as my 'lifeboat' OS for when Precise beta is playing up.

PUIAS belongs to the RHEL/CentOS/Scientific Linux group, so its conservative with older packages. The PUIAS repositories have maths oriented software that I find useful and I can use Epel/Elrepo for drivers and multimedia.

PUIAS is provided for use by University departments and has paid packager time. Not sure what the support lifetime is however.

forrestcupp
March 23rd, 2012, 03:02 PM
Strange you mention ARCH as i have just been reading about it.. i may download this over the weekend for a play. Is the Unity dektop only available to Ubuntu ?

Lol. Just hang around another week and you'll hear about Arch another 50 times. :)

It has cooled down a lot, though. At one time, you would have thought that this was Arch's alternative backup forum. :)

snowpine
March 23rd, 2012, 03:04 PM
However, you can do that with ArchBang. http://archbang.org/


True, but IMHO a "shortcut" like ArchBang or Chakra won't really help you decide "is Arch right for me?" like working methodically through the Beginner's Guide. Test-driving an attractive Openbox or KDE live CD will not teach you about pacman, rc.conf, AUR, rolling release upgrades, and so forth, which IMHO are Arch's "killer features."

Some people take one look at the Beginner's Guide and instantly know whether Arch is right or wrong for them.

fuduntu
March 23rd, 2012, 03:24 PM
Not sure I can articulate it. Something about the engineering. Sort of like how some people prefer to drive German/American/Japanese cars.

Sometimes I feel like Ubuntu is designed by arrogant nerds for the projected needs of the imaginary non-nerds of tomorrow, whereas Red Hat is designed by arrogant nerds for the immediate needs of the arrogant nerds of today.

ps I am an arrogant nerd. ;)

+1 this. Having done both, I find that it is easier to create and maintain rpm packages than deb packages. Arrogant nerds and Linux? No way! :lolflag:

snowpine
March 23rd, 2012, 03:28 PM
Ahhh! Fuduntu has become self-aware and started posting on Ubuntu Forums!!! ;)

fuduntu
March 23rd, 2012, 03:34 PM
Ahhh! Fuduntu has become self-aware and started posting on Ubuntu Forums!!! ;)

I am in ur distro flipping ur bits :guitar:

snowpine
March 23rd, 2012, 03:36 PM
I am in ur distro flipping ur bits :guitar:

Fuduntu, why is your Gnome so outdated? I thought you were supposed to be "rolling release"???

:lolflag:

fuduntu
March 23rd, 2012, 03:40 PM
Fuduntu, why is your Gnome so outdated? I thought you were supposed to be "rolling release"???

:lolflag:

Take the CD outside and roll it down the hill.

See, ROLLING RELEASE!

:lolflag:

snowpine
March 23rd, 2012, 03:42 PM
Take the CD outside and roll it down the hill.

See, ROLLING RELEASE!

:lolflag:

I placed my Fuduntu Live USB stick on an incline, but so far, it has proven to be surprisingly stable. :)

Dragonbite
March 23rd, 2012, 03:56 PM
I stick to what I call the "big three"; Ubuntu, openSUSE and Fedora.

ratcheer
March 23rd, 2012, 04:06 PM
True, but IMHO a "shortcut" like ArchBang or Chakra won't really help you decide "is Arch right for me?" like working methodically through the Beginner's Guide. Test-driving an attractive Openbox or KDE live CD will not teach you about pacman, rc.conf, AUR, rolling release upgrades, and so forth, which IMHO are Arch's "killer features."

Some people take one look at the Beginner's Guide and instantly know whether Arch is right or wrong for them.

But once you have installed ArchBang, then you just have Arch. From there on, you do learn pacman, AUR, rc.conf, etc. ArchBang just gets you up and running quickly, nothing more.

Tim

snowpine
March 23rd, 2012, 04:16 PM
But once you have installed ArchBang, then you just have Arch. From there on, you do learn pacman, AUR, rc.conf, etc. ArchBang just gets you up and running quickly, nothing more.

Fair enough; my dislike of the ArchBang artwork/aesthetic may be clouding my objectivity. :) If you had personal success with Arch without following the Beginner's Guide then I respect your testimonial.

BrokenKingpin
March 23rd, 2012, 06:51 PM
But once you have installed ArchBang, then you just have Arch. From there on, you do learn pacman, AUR, rc.conf, etc. ArchBang just gets you up and running quickly, nothing more.

++

This is the way I went for testing out Arch. I think going the openbox route was the best way to go for sure. Completely usable out of the box, but small enough that it does not crowd up your system when you install another DE.

As far as rolling release go I was also thinking about trying PCLinuxOS (maybe not true rolling, but closer to what I want). The only thing holding me back is no 64-bit editions, which is just crazy... it is ******* 2012.

Ms. Daisy
March 23rd, 2012, 07:01 PM
... Ubuntu is designed by arrogant nerds for the projected needs of the imaginary non-nerds of tomorrow...
I foresee a wildly popular ad campaign with this slogan. But who does the voice-over? James Earl Jones?

ranger1021994
March 23rd, 2012, 07:03 PM
Ubuntu . ... :) :)
Its so very ossem :) :)

KiwiNZ
March 23rd, 2012, 07:07 PM
ubuntu

asadmalik
March 23rd, 2012, 07:16 PM
Mint.
Just to see, why people are so CRAZY about this OS.

Recently read about Backtrack. So may be that's the one after Mint.

BrokenKingpin
March 23rd, 2012, 08:58 PM
Mint.
Just to see, why people are so CRAZY about this OS.

A lot of good ideas come out of Mint (LMDE for example), it is just a shame the implementation is often broken and unusable for me. So I also don't understand why people go so crazy for the Mint release.

LMDE was a good idea, but both the Gnome and Xfce versions are horrible out of date. The Xfce version is still on 4.6... why, 4.8 has been out for quite some time? I also find these release quite buggy. The recent KDE release I could not even open the Update Manager without it crashing. And I just don't see why Cinnamon needs to be a full fork of Gnome 3. People have done similar with Gnome 3 with just config changes. If you really want a Gnome 2 experiences just use Xfce.

I guess I have only found Mint irrelevant. Back in the day it was just Ubuntu with codecs, and now they have all these projects that are never fully done properly.

ratcheer
March 24th, 2012, 01:11 AM
Fair enough; my dislike of the ArchBang artwork/aesthetic may be clouding my objectivity. :) If you had personal success with Arch without following the Beginner's Guide then I respect your testimonial.

Yes, thanks. I started with ArchBang in early October. I am still running it and I have the latest secure pacman 4, kernel 3.2.12, fglrx 12.2, etc. I have also made substantial non-pacman changes such as systemd for sysinit and I have replaced slim with lxdm. In other words, I have been learning tons.


Tim

Peripheral Visionary
March 24th, 2012, 01:29 AM
I stick to LTS releases. By the time 10.04 reaches end-of-life, 12.04 will be as rock-solid and wonderful as Lucid has been.

MisterGaribaldi
March 24th, 2012, 03:11 AM
I have a better idea.

How about we work on getting Microsoft, Adobe, Apple and others to release versions of their commercial software for Linux, and work on getting F/OSS alternatives whipped into shape as full, competitive alternatives, instead of wasting precious time and money on screwing around with solid, proven UI paradigms? Hmm?

I would love to have Photoshop, iPhoto, MS Word, iTunes, RapidWeaver, QuarkXPress, QuickBooks, various games, all running natively on Linux, along side such great software as K3B, Chrome, Thunderbird, VLC, HandBrake, and others. That day comes, sign me up! because I'll be all over that stuff.

Until then, o great and wise Linux community, kindly shut up.

Thanks.

troymius
March 24th, 2012, 03:41 AM
I have a better idea.

How about we work on getting Microsoft, Adobe, Apple and others to release versions of their commercial software for Linux, and work on getting F/OSS alternatives whipped into shape as full, competitive alternatives, instead of wasting precious time and money on screwing around with solid, proven UI paradigms? Hmm?

I would love to have Photoshop, iPhoto, MS Word, iTunes, RapidWeaver, QuarkXPress, QuickBooks, various games, all running natively on Linux, along side such great software as K3B, Chrome, Thunderbird, VLC, HandBrake, and others. That day comes, sign me up! because I'll be all over that stuff.

Until then, o great and wise Linux community, kindly shut up.

Thanks.

Sorry, I don't use any of the non-Linux applications you listed above.

What do you suggest should the Linux community do to make the big companies develop SW for Linux?

linuxyogi
March 24th, 2012, 09:46 AM
You can try Linux Mint Debian Edition. Its a rolling release based on Debian testing.

linuxyogi
March 24th, 2012, 10:02 AM
A lot of good ideas come out of Mint (LMDE for example), it is just a shame the implementation is often broken and unusable for me. So I also don't understand why people go so crazy for the Mint release.

LMDE was a good idea, but both the Gnome and Xfce versions are horrible out of date. The Xfce version is still on 4.6... why, 4.8 has been out for quite some time? I also find these release quite buggy. The recent KDE release I could not even open the Update Manager without it crashing. And I just don't see why Cinnamon needs to be a full fork of Gnome 3. People have done similar with Gnome 3 with just config changes. If you really want a Gnome 2 experiences just use Xfce.

I guess I have only found Mint irrelevant. Back in the day it was just Ubuntu with codecs, and now they have all these projects that are never fully done properly.

I am using LMDE Gnome atm. They offer updates once a month. Real slow on updates but its stable.

forrestcupp
March 24th, 2012, 01:05 PM
There's always Hanna Montana Linux. ;)


I foresee a wildly popular ad campaign with this slogan. But who does the voice-over? James Earl Jones?

Morgan Freeman has been doing a lot of voice overs lately.

keithpeter
March 24th, 2012, 02:57 PM
I would love to have Photoshop, iPhoto, MS Word, iTunes, RapidWeaver, QuarkXPress, QuickBooks, various games, all running natively on Linux, along side such great software as K3B, Chrome, Thunderbird, VLC, HandBrake, and others. That day comes, sign me up! because I'll be all over that stuff.

Hello MisterGaribaldi

Adobe might take Linux desktop seriously if it has plenty of users, and if there is a commercial aspect to it.

Logically, therefore, we should be pushing Ubuntu like mad, and we should be supporting the application market features in Ubuntu.

I feel a thread coming on...

Ms. Daisy
March 24th, 2012, 03:27 PM
There's always Hannah Montana Linux. ;)
OMG that's actually a thing... I'm... speechless...

Lightstar
March 24th, 2012, 03:39 PM
I want chocolate flavour!

cwklinuxguy
March 24th, 2012, 04:18 PM
My netbook is currently running Pinguy OS, and for the moment I am not an Ubuntu user, but I will be when 12.04 comes out, both because I want a change and because I plan to use Ubuntu as a product for my future computer business which I am working on. Now that I can easily install MATE, I'll be able to dive into Ubuntu without going crazy. However, my friend has talked me into trying Debian, and so I am going to do that, and it may end up on my Netbook instead. I don't think I'll be able to sell that netbook model in my business anyway, as Windows 8 is not far off and will lock down that and most other modern computers :(

I also have my eye on Aurora and I may try Dreamlinux again one day.

Dry Lips
March 24th, 2012, 09:00 PM
True, but IMHO a "shortcut" like ArchBang or Chakra won't really help you decide "is Arch right for me?" like working methodically through the Beginner's Guide.

Technically Chakra isn't "Arch" the way Archbang is. Chakra is an independent distro which isn't compatible with Arch anymore. The relationship between Arch and Chakra is more like between Debian and Ubuntu.

snowpine
March 24th, 2012, 09:18 PM
Technically Chakra isn't "Arch" the way Archbang is. Chakra is an independent distro which isn't compatible with Arch anymore. The relationship between Arch and Chakra is more like between Debian and Ubuntu.

Thanks for the update, clearly it has been a few years since I tried Chakra. :)

sir.sargento
March 25th, 2012, 12:05 AM
Questions Arch can be answered by the almighty Arch Wiki:

https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Unity

Based on that, I'd stay, Stick with Ubuntu if Unity is your desktop environment of choice.

Arch is not a "download and take it for a spin over the weekend" type of distro. :) Installing it will take you a day or 2 working carefully step-by-step from this guide: https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Beginners%27_Guide

I disagree. I gave Arch a try on a whim. I just downloaded the ISO, rebooted, and installed Arch on my whole system.. While it does take a bit more thinking than installing Ubuntu I don't think its very difficult. I think sometimes people try to make anything sound like it is harder than using Ubuntu. It only took me a couple hours to get it installed and XFCE up and running.

Of course I had some problems I had to look up and fix. But I've also had that with every single distro I've ever tried. The people in IRC #archlinux are a great help. Now I have been using Arch for about 7 months and wouldn't use another distro. I reccomend anybody that wants to get it a try to do so.

cwklinuxguy
March 25th, 2012, 01:50 AM
I have a better idea.

How about we work on getting Microsoft, Adobe, Apple and others to release versions of their commercial software for Linux, and work on getting F/OSS alternatives whipped into shape as full, competitive alternatives, instead of wasting precious time and money on screwing around with solid, proven UI paradigms? Hmm?

That's not a bad idea, however I see no reason to stop a perfectly good and valid discussion of Linux distributions just because of that goal. They are not mutually exclusive.


I would love to have Photoshop, iPhoto, MS Word, iTunes, RapidWeaver, QuarkXPress, QuickBooks, various games, all running natively on Linux, along side such great software as K3B, Chrome, Thunderbird, VLC, HandBrake, and others. That day comes, sign me up! because I'll be all over that stuff.

Until then, o great and wise Linux community, kindly shut up.

Thanks.

I very much doubt you will ever see that happen. Those programs, particularly the Apple ones, thrive because people are forced to use a certain platform in order to run them. They have a monopoly lock, they have exclusivity. And these big companies aren't going to give it up just to satisfy the needs of a small percentage of Desktop users. Windows has about 90% market share, and Apple's market share is growing. If you want to make money, you don't write software for the market with the least people in it....and I find it unlikely that it would be worth the while of these companies to develop alternate versions of the software for that same small market. That's unfortunately just how it is right now.

MisterGaribaldi
March 25th, 2012, 02:05 AM
That's not a bad idea, however I see no reason to stop a perfectly good and valid discussion of Linux distributions just because of that goal. They are not mutually exclusive.



I very much doubt you will ever see that happen. Those programs, particularly the Apple ones, thrive because people are forced to use a certain platform in order to run them. They have a monopoly lock, they have exclusivity. And these big companies aren't going to give it up just to satisfy the needs of a small percentage of Desktop users. Windows has about 90% market share, and Apple's market share is growing. If you want to make money, you don't write software for the market with the least people in it....and I find it unlikely that it would be worth the while of these companies to develop alternate versions of the software for that same small market. That's unfortunately just how it is right now.

Which, unfortunately, is what prevents desktop Linux from being useful for me. Now, server or even embedded Linux, on the other hand, are quite useful.

Spr0k3t
March 25th, 2012, 02:18 AM
I'm in the process of building a respin of 12.04 without Unity. Going to do LXDE and Gnome3. The respin I'm building is going to be for a corporate environment if I can get all the packages to fit on a CD. Don't have a name, logo, or anything for it yet but the experience has been fun building. I'd love to remove all of the ubuntu bits (unity, ubuntu1, custom firefox stuffs) but still give all the credit back to ubuntu when it's done.

Other than that, I use Arch, Fedora, Mint, Backtrack, and a handful of other smaller distros (DSL, Puppy) for the work I do. My favorite I keep going back to is still Ubuntu running Gnome DE.

Bandit
March 25th, 2012, 03:40 AM
I am running all out Fedora Core 16 these days with Gnome 3.2.
Its running wonderfully, fast and stable. Super easy to install as it detected my 4 drive raid array and set it up without any issues what so ever. They have came a long ways with stability the past few years and GNOME is doing better in 3.2 then it was when I tested the BETA. Still missing a few options such as a theme selector, but there is software in the repos already to work around this.

bfmetcalf
March 25th, 2012, 04:14 AM
Started with Ubuntu when I made the move from windows and accidentally stopped windows cold turkey (easy to hit a wrong button and wipe everything!). Now I'm using arch and absolutely love it. When I built mundane computer, my wife made windows a requirement, but arch still lives on my second here and is going strong. I don't see myself moving anytime soon.

wolfen69
March 25th, 2012, 05:51 PM
But once you have installed ArchBang, then you just have Arch. From there on, you do learn pacman, AUR, rc.conf, etc. ArchBang just gets you up and running quickly, nothing more.

Tim
And learning arch only teaches you how to run arch.

ratcheer
March 25th, 2012, 10:48 PM
And learning arch only teaches you how to run arch.

Yes, I guess so. But, it is a trip in and of itself.

What would you recommend instead. Gentoo? Debian? Slackware? Other...?

Tim