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meduser
March 19th, 2012, 07:27 PM
I had to check a document that I had made for a school project, and needed to use Office 2010 to check the doc.

I have to say, MSOffice blows the pants off of libre-office, from what little experience I have with Libre-office. I made my doc up, spell checked it, and then saved it as a docx file in Libre. When I went to print the docx, things where all over the place, and the spell checker in libre missed some pretty obvious errors. Is there packages or upgrades that I need to install for libre to be considered a real alternative to office? or is there a better program to use?

Any help is as always appreciated. One day, I will be knowledgeable enough to help others.

Med

TeoBigusGeekus
March 19th, 2012, 07:38 PM
I have to say, MSOffice blows the pants off of libre-office
Unfortunately true...


Is there packages or upgrades that I need to install for libre to be considered a real alternative to office? or is there a better program to use?
None that I know of; if you feel that uncomfortable with LO, then you should consider dual booting.

snowpine
March 19th, 2012, 07:41 PM
You may have better luck using LibreOffice's native file formats (.odt and so forth) rather than the Microsoft .docx format.

But if your school requires Microsoft Office for some assignments, then there really is no substitute. :)

TeoBigusGeekus
March 19th, 2012, 07:54 PM
You may have better luck using LibreOffice's native file formats (.odt and so forth) rather than the Microsoft .docx format.

...and even so, manipulating large and complicated documents with many tables makes LO go berzerk and do strange stuff sometimes.
But, what can you do; it's free...

Penguinnerd
March 19th, 2012, 08:02 PM
I've had the same issue, and I found a workaround.

If you use the old .doc instead of the newer .docx, it should work fine, or at least better.

meduser
March 19th, 2012, 08:03 PM
Yeah..I wish it was that easy..lol

My instructors at school want different assignments turned in in different formats. Yesterdays was a 5000 word essay, that needed to be turned in in DOCX format, and needed to be setup in APA formatting.

I used libre office to make the document, and find it is very easy to use, and for the most part is not much different from using Microsoft word.

I saved the file with it looking and displaying correctly for me, but when I printed it, the page numbers had dropped down a line, and some spelling and grammar mistakes weren't caught. I found this out when I loaded the file up on MSWord..up to that point in this assignment, I was thrilled with libre-office.

I know to use a template, I had to download and install the libraries needed for it, so I am wondering if that has to be done for options offered for libre, and if so, what are the main ones I should install.

Next to that, I am liking the Linux OS and the programs similar to the MS based ones are great. It would just be nice to get something that could be similar to what I am used to using for office.

Thanks for the advice.

HiImTye
March 19th, 2012, 08:29 PM
make use of the print preview feature and try to use the .doc format (if nothing else, before converting to .docx) to make sure that everything looks right. I found that making the tables larger than the page and making sure that the table margins are as small as possible helped me a lot

other than that, the next best thing would be to use Microsnot Office, if you need for it to be in a specific format that LO is having difficulties with. if you need something then you need it and it's best to get your project done correctly than to be a die-hard and lose marks

TeoBigusGeekus
March 19th, 2012, 08:34 PM
I always print my LO documents/spreadsheets after I've converted them to pdf.

SeijiSensei
March 19th, 2012, 08:56 PM
I always print my LO documents/spreadsheets after I've converted them to pdf.

That's a good idea as long as the teacher doesn't require the actual document.

You might take a look at Abiword (http://www.abisource.com/), another free word processor. It's more stripped-down than open/libre office, but it might handle your particular needs better. You can install it from the repos. I also find the gnumeric (http://projects.gnome.org/gnumeric/) spreadsheet can perform better than the OO/LO spreadsheets for some tasks.

TeoBigusGeekus
March 19th, 2012, 09:00 PM
That's a good idea as long as the teacher doesn't require the actual document.

Print the document from pdf, give the teacher the docx file from LO.
If he tries to print it and doesn't get the same result, he won't talk about it.

PhantomTurtle
March 19th, 2012, 09:12 PM
If you need to open it in school, just get a copy of libreoffice portable from portableapps.com (http://portableapps.com/). Put it on a USB drive and save the document in a LO native format. Also other word processors like AbiWord are also available on the portable apps site. You could also try Google docs which is what I mainly use for school related things because I can download the document in the .odt format for a ms office format and it is available from anywhere.

meduser
March 19th, 2012, 09:51 PM
Thanks everyone for your opinions.

I don't currently have a need for Office, as the assignment is finished, and turned in already. I was thinking more for the future should I need to use it. With only 5 weeks left until the practicum begins, I can't see any big projects coming my way.

I was just curious if this was just how libre is or if it needed add ons to catch up to MS Office a bit. Or if there was a better program to use with Kubuntu. I know with text editors, I loved Notepad ++ for Windows, but I can't find the same type of text editor in Kubuntu. I have tried Gedit, Jedit, Bluefish, Ecclipse, Geany, and some others...I know you can't always find exactly what you want, I just wish some of the software that I like using could be used in Linux. I don't like using wine.

Again, thanks all for the ideas. I appreciate the input.


Med

I have used Google docs before, and that is what I have been doing all semester since going 100% Linux.

I was just kind of shocked that a file saved as a DOCX could look so differently when open in a different program.

daslinkard
March 19th, 2012, 09:59 PM
I find it interesting the issue you had with LO...the idea that someone else had in regards to the PDF format has helped me. I wonder though if the issue doesn't come in from the new MS Office 2007/2010 formatting? For work I constantly type things utilizing LO and saving in the .doc format and not once have I had an issue where there was a mistake.

So this makes me wonder if MS got a little smart and changed something for compatibility issues?

SeijiSensei
March 19th, 2012, 10:01 PM
Microsoft Office used to format documents based on the printer driver installed on the computer. I don't know if this is the default behavior any longer, but that practice limited portability considerably. If you have complex layouts where things need to be in specific locations, you might it hard to move between OO/LO and MS.

snowpine
March 19th, 2012, 10:07 PM
Sounds like your teacher does not understand that MS Word .docx is not a portable document format. (That's what the "P" in "PDF" stands for.) It's really not a Linux/Windows issue at all; you could be running authentic legal Windows and authentic legal Office, and still have issues where the formatting looks a little different printed from the teacher's computer/printer vs. if you print the same document on your computer/printer.

Call me old fashioned, but when I was in school, teachers graded us on our ideas and writing skill, rather than margins/font size/formatting.

Zill
March 19th, 2012, 10:27 PM
...I was just kind of shocked that a file saved as a DOCX could look so differently when open in a different program.
Back in the dim and distant past when I used MS applications at work, I remember MS documents frequently displayed differently on different PCs. This was primarily due to the different fonts and styles saved on each PC and templates.

As already stated, if you want to retain document appearance then save a copy as a pdf file.

xedi
March 19th, 2012, 10:38 PM
If you feel like it you could also point out to your teacher, that it is problematic demanding assignments as .docx .

First of all, he will probably only read it and not want to edit it and in these cases .pdf is the best choice. I always send .pdf to anybody if it is only meant to be read only.

Then also him demanding .docx forces you to buy Office, which is unfair (or the school, if you use their version) since as you experienced .docx can be problematic with LibreOffice sometimes and there is a good alternative with .odt to which also your teacher has access.

I don't know where you are but it drove me nuts when I studied in the US that everybody there used .docx and .pptx for EVERYTHING. Even if I had a copy of Office I would have preferred .pdf 99% of the time.

daslinkard
March 19th, 2012, 10:42 PM
The PDF feature is one that I have found particularly useful especially in typing resumes. I have found that when posting .Doc files on company resume portals there is always something that ends up getting distorted, but by utilizing the PDF format I am able to keep it the way I intended it to look aesthetically speaking.

snowpine
March 19th, 2012, 10:46 PM
Agreed; and why do schools/educators not understand that by requiring students to use expensive Microsoft Office software, they are indirectly contributing to software piracy? :(

meduser
March 19th, 2012, 10:56 PM
The course I am taking is in IT and presentation has been a huge part of one of the 10 classes I have been taking. We also have to give a 20 minute lecture to over 100 people in a auditorium on technology as part of the course. I don't really believe I will need public speaking or putting presentations together for the field I am going into, and if I do, it will down the road and new technology will be available at that point in time.

Having the assignments completed in the format requested is part of the labs, and by doing it, proves that you have used the technology.

It is not a matter of legal software or not, as I have legit copies of every type of Win 7, and Microsoft office enterprise, Microsoft Visio, Project, Microsoft Server 2008, etc, etc..the list goes on and on, and it is all legal as deemed by the university who provided me with the licence keys for each product. One of my courses is Linux, so I took the plunge and decided to go 100% Linux for the semester. I have liked it so much, I am not going to go back to Windows. So not having Windows or Office is not really an excuse when dealing with school assignments.

TeoBigusGeekus
March 19th, 2012, 10:59 PM
Real geeks use Latex anyway... :lolflag:

0011235813
March 19th, 2012, 11:09 PM
Has everyone forgotten about Google Docs? Seriously? It's like... The most cross platform office suite on the planet! The only thing you need to use it is a standards compliant browser!
I use it to make Docs for school, and it works much nicer than LO. I don't have to worry about printing issues or anything like that, and all my docs are in the cloud!

However, if you need to upload a doc in a specific format, and LO can't do it... Maybe you should consider trying to convince the teachers to install LO? It's free after all, and it'll work much nicer than .docx... If not, you can blame them for forcing you to use Windows, which reminds me, does your school have IT suites?

@Teo
Yeah, but most people don't know hot to program such a difficult language, perhaps HTML would be more suitable? www.w3schools.com
Then when you upload it, you can just open it with Internet Exploder Internet Explorer.

TeoBigusGeekus
March 19th, 2012, 11:15 PM
@Teo
Yeah, but most people don't know hot to program such a difficult language, perhaps HTML would be more suitable? www.w3schools.com
Then when you upload it, you can just open it with Internet Exploder Internet Explorer.

Just joking man...

0011235813
March 19th, 2012, 11:43 PM
Just joking man...

I know.
But on a more serious note, using HTML isn't a bad idea, and I know that some University Postdocs in The University of Manchester prefer to use LaTeX rather than nifty little programs like LyX, TeXmaker, or Winshell.

TeoBigusGeekus
March 19th, 2012, 11:49 PM
I know.
But on a more serious note, using HTML isn't a bad idea, and I know that some University Postdocs in The University of Manchester prefer to use LaTeX rather than nifty little programs like LyX, TeXmaker, or Winshell.

I think we're overestimating teachers' IQ and/or relationship with technology.
They know MSOffice, they trust MSOffice, they only use MSOffice.
Anything different cannot be understood and is therefore a work of the DEVIL :twisted: deserving only to be destroyed.

meduser
March 20th, 2012, 01:54 AM
; you could be running authentic legal Windows and authentic legal Office, size/formatting.

Just to clear this up. My school is part of Microsofts MSDN Alliance network, so I have access to countless versions of Microsoft software. Legally acquired.

Mark Phelps
March 20th, 2012, 12:19 PM
Just to clear this up. My school is part of Microsofts MSDN Alliance network, so I have access to countless versions of Microsoft software. Legally acquired.

That's quite often the case ...

Schools that use and REQUIRE the usage of MS Office generally make it available to their students for very low prices.

So, instead of having to shell out $500 for Office Pro, you only have to shell out $50 for Office Academic -- which has the same features as Pro.

Adrian98
March 20th, 2012, 01:09 PM
Ha ha ha ..That's straight and simple way to make the teacher's mouth shut up!!!

uRock
March 20th, 2012, 01:18 PM
If you use the old .doc instead of the newer .docx, it should work fine, or at least better.
I've noticed this as well.

I always print my LO documents/spreadsheets after I've converted them to pdf.
I always PDF my files as well. Can't go wrong as long as the instructor will except it.

Agreed; and why do schools/educators not understand that by requiring students to use expensive Microsoft Office software, they are indirectly contributing to software piracy? :(
When I took the IS101 class, which teaches how to use MS Office, I used OpenOffice to do every assignment and was lucky enough to have my formatting not get messed up.

Just to clear this up. My school is part of Microsofts MSDN Alliance network, so I have access to countless versions of Microsoft software. Legally acquired.I have an account with MSDNAA at my school, MS Office is not a part of their program at my school. Luckily, I just bought a Dell which came with MS Office 2010 on it.

uRock
March 20th, 2012, 01:59 PM
Future posts supporting Piracy will be removed. Feel free to revisit the Code of Conduct (http://ubuntuforums.org/index.php?page=policy).

0011235813
March 20th, 2012, 04:59 PM
I think we're overestimating teachers' IQ and/or relationship with technology.
They know MSOffice, they trust MSOffice, they only use MSOffice.
Anything different cannot be understood and is therefore a work of the DEVIL :twisted: deserving only to be destroyed.
Yes, that does seem to be a common misconception among teachers. Somebody should sue them... Maybe another monopoly trial for Mr? Seriously, it's like, you mention using anything else and they look at you like you've just grown wings.

Roasted
March 20th, 2012, 06:12 PM
*shrug* We're starting to move towards Libre Office instead of MS Office. While there are some compatibility concerns, it's nothing that is stopping the train.

I personally have had a lesser-than-easy experience with MS Office over the years, from 00 to 03, 07, 2010, etc. The upgrade transitions is more of a headache than I care to deal with. On the flip side, Libre Office has always just kind of worked for me... To each his own.

EDIT - for what it's worth, my work place is a K-12 school district.

Frogs Hair
March 20th, 2012, 07:14 PM
One of my main reasons for dual booting is the need for MS Office . I have a many presentations this semester and Power Point is a must . I just don't want to bother with changing document formats and risking errors at the moment.

mastablasta
March 20th, 2012, 08:23 PM
MS office can install and works in wine. With latest wine even 2010 will work. However 2007 works in the wine that comes with 11.10.

but how well it works for your need you should try and see for your self.

Libre office did save the day when editing 300 page book. but that was only once. and even then it behaved badly.

i still don't understand why a smaller 50 page book made in Word 2003 when imported to LO get's the headers lost. i mean it's not like this is some advanced formating or something.

0011235813
March 20th, 2012, 08:38 PM
MS office can install and works in wine. With latest wine even 2010 will work. However 2007 works in the wine that comes with 11.10.

but how well it works for your need you should try and see for your self.

Libre office did save the day when editing 300 page book. but that was only once. and even then it behaved badly.

i still don't understand why a smaller 50 page book made in Word 2003 when imported to LO get's the headers lost. i mean it's not like this is some advanced formating or something.

I think Wine is a compromise- not a "solution". A lot of Windows software works in Wine- a lot doesn't (or doesn't work properly), it's all a bit down to chance.
That said, Wine can be very useful- why isn't it pre-installed?

snowpine
March 20th, 2012, 08:56 PM
That said, Wine can be very useful- why isn't it pre-installed?

I don't know the definitive answer, but I would imagine for two reasons:

1. To encourage adoption of open-source apps like Libreoffice
2. Because WINE is a complete waste of space for users who aren't migrating from Windows

cotcot
March 20th, 2012, 10:18 PM
MS Office should be compatible with OO, LO, abiword etc instead of OO, LO etc compatible with MS Office.

I have very bad experience with excel 2007 messing with macros of a 2003 spreadsheet. Backwards compatible they call it ! (at work I cannot switch to LO or so)

SeijiSensei
March 21st, 2012, 12:21 AM
I think Wine is a compromise- not a "solution". A lot of Windows software works in Wine- a lot doesn't (or doesn't work properly), it's all a bit down to chance.
That said, Wine can be very useful- why isn't it pre-installed?

Space is at a premium when the target is a 700 MB CD-ROM. Lots of useful things end up omitted; Kubuntu doesn't come with GIMP, for instance.

I prefer VirtualBox (http://www.virtualbox.org/) for running Windows software. In "seamless" mode I can put the Windows panel on the top edge of my screen and assign Windows to a specific desktop to keep it out of the way. You obviously need a licensed copy of Windows to go this route, whereas Wine is open-source.

meduser
March 21st, 2012, 01:32 AM
I am not looking for a way to run MSOffice in Linux. I am trying to walk away from Windows altogether.

My experience has been great so far with most Linux based software. There are a few programs I would like to see a similar program in Linux, like Notepad++ or some of the Office features, but there is not enough for me to want to deal with Windows.

I am relieved to see it was not inexperience with the L/O software that caused my issues, but the software itself.

I really liked the L/O software until it came time to print it up, and then the formatting was tossed. I learned....lol

I would love for L/O to step up and put out a real office package that can be a true competitor to MSOffice.

gleedadswell
March 21st, 2012, 05:29 AM
I am not looking for a way to run
There are a few programs I would like to see a similar program in Linux, like Notepad++ or some of the Office features, but there is not enough for me to want to deal with Windows.


Good to hear you're generally enjoying Linux. I can't say I'm familiar with Notepad++, but a quick look suggests there should be several text editors available in Linux with similar or superior capabilities. Which have you tried? Among the most common:

gedit is easy to learn and "knows" many languages and will do syntax highlighting.

emacs is my favourite. It is extremely capable and extensible. It will run the compiler for you if you set it up to do so, so it's almost an integrated development environment. But it has a bit of steep learning curve.

I've never warmed up to vim (which will get me instantly flamed for admitting it in public :rolleyes: ) but lots of people swear by it.

Or if coding is what you are doing then you might try an IDE. There are lots available. I like Netbeans.

On the LibreOffice front, saving to .docx is a bit of a problem (but as already mentioned .doc works well). But it seems to be getting better at it all the time. I've been generating presentations in LibreOffice and saving them to .ppt so I can give them on Windoze machines. Despite the presentations being full of graphics and sometimes video I've been impressed that the conversion has been nearly flawless.

dragonfly41
March 21st, 2012, 11:22 AM
Anyone trying out the unofficial Scrivener beta on ubuntu?

http://www.literatureandlatte.com/forum/viewforum.php?f=33

It's a pre-processor to compose and output fragments of documents to different intermediate formats *.doc, *.pdf, *.odt .. etc (see compile stage) for final formatting.

meduser
March 21st, 2012, 01:34 PM
Good to hear you're generally enjoying Linux. I can't say I'm familiar with Notepad++, but a quick look suggests there should be several text editors available in Linux with similar or superior capabilities. Which have you tried? Among the most common:

emacs is my favourite. It is extremely capable and extensible. It will run the compiler for you if you set it up to do so, so it's almost an integrated development environment. But it has a bit of steep learning curve.


Or if coding is what you are doing then you might try an IDE. There are lots available. I like Netbeans.



The text editors I have tried are extensive..lol

Gedit, Jedit, Geaney, Vim, Bluefish, Zim.

I also code in PHP, javascript, java, ajax, HTML, etc, so I use:
Eclipse, Netbeans, Mysql.

My favorite is Netbeans and Bluefish out of the lot of them.

I have not tried emacs, but will give that one a go too.

Thank you for the suggestions

SeijiSensei
March 21st, 2012, 02:05 PM
emacs is my favourite. It is extremely capable and extensible.

I've never warmed up to vim (which will get me instantly flamed for admitting it in public :rolleyes: ) but lots of people swear by it.

I've never liked vim either. Nowadays I use the less-bulky version of emacs called jed. It's in the repositories.

Despite having Kate available on my KDE desktop I still rely on text-mode editors. I do a lot of coding on remote sites via SSH, so a text-mode editor is much easier to use.

meduser
March 21st, 2012, 02:56 PM
So I have tried out emacs for the last 30 minutes. I like it so far, but I am going to have to fiddle with it longer.

forrestcupp
March 21st, 2012, 03:05 PM
MS office can install and works in wine. With latest wine even 2010 will work. However 2007 works in the wine that comes with 11.10.

but how well it works for your need you should try and see for your self.Here is a link (http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1885051) to a thread explaining how to install MS Office 2010 with Wine. Like you said, 2010 works with the very latest Wine. Office 2007 doesn't work with the Wine that is in 12.04, but you can still install it with PlayOnLinux, which can manage multiple versions of Wine behind the scenes. I'm running 2007 in Precise, and Word, Excel, and Powerpoint work perfectly. I've heard the same for 2010. Publisher and Access won't work with Wine, though.

If your classes are going to require MS Office, this is going to be your best bet. It's either that, dual boot, or run Windows in a VM. But it's working perfectly for me in Wine, and I can't even tell I'm not running it in Windows. LibreOffice is definitely not a solution if you need docx compatibility.

Mark Phelps
March 21st, 2012, 05:17 PM
MS Office cover a LOT of apps, some of which don't work at all in Wine or any of its derivatives. And with Office 2010, MS expanded the list even more.

Before you commit to using Wine or PlayOnLinux, see if you can find out which apps you will have to use.

If you end up having to use MS Access, or MS Project, or other such unsupported apps, you will need to use MS Windows or run Windows in Virtualbox to do the work.

Dragonbite
March 21st, 2012, 05:32 PM
Microsoft Office Online (part of their Live and SkyDrive offering) is available through a browser (and ironically is faster in Chrome or Firefox than IE).

The good point of it is that it is almost 100% compatible with any Office-produced documents, even if you cannot do it from the browser version.

For example, if you have an image on the right side in Office, and upload it into Office Online you will VIEW the file with the picture on the right side, even though in the Browser editor there is no way to put the picture there. Go figure.

meduser
March 21st, 2012, 06:02 PM
Microsoft Office Online (part of their Live and SkyDrive offering) is available through a browser (and ironically is faster in Chrome or Firefox than IE).

The good point of it is that it is almost 100% compatible with any Office-produced documents, even if you cannot do it from the browser version.

For example, if you have an image on the right side in Office, and upload it into Office Online you will VIEW the file with the picture on the right side, even though in the Browser editor there is no way to put the picture there. Go figure.

Yeah I guess I could use Office 365 online too.

Thanks for the good idea :p

0011235813
March 21st, 2012, 09:18 PM
Space is at a premium when the target is a 700 MB CD-ROM. Lots of useful things end up omitted; Kubuntu doesn't come with GIMP, for instance.

I prefer VirtualBox (http://www.virtualbox.org/) for running Windows software. In "seamless" mode I can put the Windows panel on the top edge of my screen and assign Windows to a specific desktop to keep it out of the way. You obviously need a licensed copy of Windows to go this route, whereas Wine is open-source.
OK, I understand that- but it seems a bit weird. Ubuntu is a fully fledged modern OS, and the idea that it must be fitted on to a CD seems silly. Most people use DVDs, that is, if they even use discs at all, may computers now a days don't have optical drives, USB sticks are what Ubuntu should be concentrating on! Besides, couldn't they offer a "lite" version like Mint does?

As for virtualization, I would imagine most people would be incapable of doing that kind of thing- a dual-boot would be much more sensible, MS hater or not.

PS: Kubuntu doesn't come with GIMP because of KDE am I right?

Anyone trying out the unofficial Scrivener beta on ubuntu?

http://www.literatureandlatte.com/forum/viewforum.php?f=33

It's a pre-processor to compose and output fragments of documents to different intermediate formats *.doc, *.pdf, *.odt .. etc (see compile stage) for final formatting.
Hmmm... I don't really like Scrivener a whole lot, it's expensive and rather bloated. I would prefer Kabikaboo, with Gedit and Writer. Kab to plan out the chapters etc, Ged to write it all, and Writer to put it all together and export to PDF (which would probably have to be copied down to .epub in caliber )

Microsoft Office Online (part of their Live and SkyDrive offering) is available through a browser (and ironically is faster in Chrome or Firefox than IE).

The good point of it is that it is almost 100% compatible with any Office-produced documents, even if you cannot do it from the browser version.

For example, if you have an image on the right side in Office, and upload it into Office Online you will VIEW the file with the picture on the right side, even though in the Browser editor there is no way to put the picture there. Go figure.

That sounds interesting. Maybe MS has learned from Google?

HiImTye
March 21st, 2012, 09:50 PM
OK, I understand that- but it seems a bit weird. Ubuntu is a fully fledged modern OS, and the idea that it must be fitted on to a CD seems silly.
Ubuntu is supposed to be open to people in other parts of the world, also, who have less powerful, less advanced hardware (rural africa, for instance)

0011235813
March 21st, 2012, 10:10 PM
Ubuntu is supposed to be open to people in other parts of the world, also, who have less powerful, less advanced hardware (rural africa, for instance)

And are people in rural Africa going to have
a.) a computer
b.) a computer with an optical drive

That doesn't make any sense. If anything, one would be less interested in CDs as optical drives add unnecessary costs to computers. Besides, if somebody in rural Africa has a computer, isn't it probably going to be running Sugar OS anyway? Do you have anything against Fedora by any chance?

HiImTye
March 21st, 2012, 10:37 PM
And are people in rural Africa going to have
a.) a computer
b.) a computer with an optical drive

That doesn't make any sense. If anything, one would be less interested in CDs as optical drives add unnecessary costs to computers. Besides, if somebody in rural Africa has a computer, isn't it probably going to be running Sugar OS anyway? Do you have anything against Fedora by any chance?
it isn't my personal preference, it's what we've been fed for years

0011235813
March 21st, 2012, 10:51 PM
it isn't my personal preference, it's what we've been fed for years

Fedora? What are you talking about? Sorry.

HiImTye
March 21st, 2012, 10:54 PM
Ubuntu's ease of access, is that not what we're talking about?

SeijiSensei
March 22nd, 2012, 12:38 AM
OK, I understand that- but it seems a bit weird. Ubuntu is a fully fledged modern OS, and the idea that it must be fitted on to a CD seems silly.

As the other poster mentioned, Canonical wants to make Ubuntu as widely available as possible. Up to now that's meant making sure it fits on a CD. For Kubuntu, at least, there's also a DVD version that contains a much larger array of software. If you think this policy should be changed, you're welcome to take it up with the developers.


As for virtualization, I would imagine most people would be incapable of doing that kind of thing- a dual-boot would be much more sensible, MS hater or not.

I've found installing VirtualBox to be pretty painless. There's a "wizard" that walks you through the steps for creating a virtual machine. Dual-booting is a pain if you just want to run the occasional Windows program while staying largely in Linux.

Yes, it's easier to install a Linux distro onto a machine that already has Windows. But if you don't already have Windows installed, using a virtual machine makes much more sense.


PS: Kubuntu doesn't come with GIMP because of KDE am I right?

Not entirely from what I've read. It does require some of the GNOME/GTK libraries to be installed along with the program itself. Taken together, including GIMP would break the 700 MB barrier. I'm not even sure it's included by default on the Ubuntu CD either, but since I don't use GNOME or Unity, I can't say that for sure.

0011235813
March 22nd, 2012, 12:11 PM
As the other poster mentioned, Canonical wants to make Ubuntu as widely available as possible. Up to now that's meant making sure it fits on a CD. For Kubuntu, at least, there's also a DVD version that contains a much larger array of software. If you think this policy should be changed, you're welcome to take it up with the developers.



I've found installing VirtualBox to be pretty painless. There's a "wizard" that walks you through the steps for creating a virtual machine. Dual-booting is a pain if you just want to run the occasional Windows program while staying largely in Linux.

Yes, it's easier to install a Linux distro onto a machine that already has Windows. But if you don't already have Windows installed, using a virtual machine makes much more sense.



Not entirely from what I've read. It does require some of the GNOME/GTK libraries to be installed along with the program itself. Taken together, including GIMP would break the 700 MB barrier. I'm not even sure it's included by default on the Ubuntu CD either, but since I don't use GNOME or Unity, I can't say that for sure.

I found those virtualization tools to be a pain in installing, and I seriously doubt my non-geek friends could ever use it.

I was thinking since KDE is so large, there wouldn't be enough space left for The GIMP?

To your last question, 11.10 in Unity/Gnome has The GIMP pre-installed.

meduser
March 22nd, 2012, 01:56 PM
I already have VMware and virtualbox running..lol

I am running Microsoft Server 2008, Ubuntu 11.10, Fedora 16, Windows 8 Server, and Win7 in them. I needed these for other classes, not just for fun. They were just as simple to setup and run as installing on a new system. I didn't find dual boot to be hard either.

I will probably do what I can in Google docs, as that seems to be the easiest solution.

veroslav
March 22nd, 2012, 01:58 PM
To your last question, 11.10 in Unity/Gnome has The GIMP pre-installed.

Not true.

Spewed
March 22nd, 2012, 05:10 PM
Open Office is really good, and quite comparable to Microsoft Office. I used it at my previous place of employment, which was an office job. It's free, and open source. I have no idea if it's compatible with Ubuntu or not, but that fact that it's free and open source, it may!

Check it out.

0011235813
March 22nd, 2012, 08:45 PM
Not true.

Well I have it on my desktop and I didn't install it.
Are you sure? Can you provide any evidence for these claims?

SeijiSensei
March 22nd, 2012, 10:38 PM
I downloaded the 11.10 Ubuntu desktop CD and browsed it. GIMP is not on the disk.

0011235813
March 23rd, 2012, 04:39 PM
I downloaded the 11.10 Ubuntu desktop CD and browsed it. GIMP is not on the disk.

Maybe it came bundled with Gnome-shell or KDE I downloaded. *shrug*

uRock
March 24th, 2012, 12:09 AM
Moved to Recurring Discussions.

alexan
March 24th, 2012, 08:25 PM
Back in topic:
Office 365 on Ubuntu with Firefox
http://www.v3.co.uk/v3-uk/v3-co-uk-labs-blog/2086291/office-365-mac-linux

/thread

meduser
March 27th, 2012, 11:59 PM
@ alexan:
yes I have used office 365 online at school before, and it seems ok....but it is a Microsoft product, and I am trying to break away from Microsoft altogether. It will work fine for school, but it is not a Linux product or OSS.

I know that I started this thread looking to see if there were any add ons that I could get for Libre, and the responses have been great.

I am new to the community, and I apologise if anyone is offended, but a decent office suite that can be comparable feature wise is really required. I had not used L.O very much until recently, and found it was far below MSOffice when I did.

Is there any projects out there for a better Office suite?

I am puzzled that saving a file in APA format as docx in L.O is different from how MSOffice displays the same APA formatted docx document. The settings for APA is pretty much universal, margins at an inch, title on each page, along with page number, etc. It really should look the same whether looked at in L.O. or MSOffice. But that was not the case.

Again, no offence, but if I am trying to move away from Microsoft and it's products, then using wine or online websites to access Microsoft products defeats the whole purpose.

PhantomTurtle
March 28th, 2012, 12:56 AM
I don't think there's any way to get it perfect. Sometimes the document messed up. It can never be completely compatible. Your best bet for now(we'll get it soon, but until we do) is to use something like office 365. But if you want to completely break away from ms, you can always use Google Docs, it might be the only alternative for now.

Copper Bezel
March 28th, 2012, 04:29 AM
There's also Softmaker Office (http://www.softmaker.com/english/of_en.htm), which is more fully MS-Office compatible. I use LibreOffice and just output everything as both .odt and .pdf. But yeah, Office 365 is the simplest and most effective if you don't mind paying for it.

Dragonbite
March 28th, 2012, 01:56 PM
@ alexan:
yes I have used office 365 online at school before, and it seems ok....but it is a Microsoft product, and I am trying to break away from Microsoft altogether.

The problem is if you want something that swims like a duck, quacks like a duck and waddles like a duck... you have to get a duck (a swan won't do).

On the other hand, I would keep an eye on LibreOffice because in a short amount of time since they split from OpenOffice there have been a number of improvements in MS Office compatibility (and other aspects).

I'm curious about Calligra. KOffice wasn't bad in the interface but I found it more questionable for compatibility. Calligra is, I think, supposed to be including much greater compatibility.

While I would be doubtful, you could always see if IBM still releases their Lotus Office product, which is built off of OpenOffice but with their own tweaks. Those tweaks may be in compatibility and being from IBM they may have added code or be able to add code the others miss. In the current state of Office products, though, I am not very confident on this product.

(on a side-note, I hear LibreOffice is working on an online version.)

meduser
March 29th, 2012, 05:23 AM
Ok just downloaded a trial of the softmaker software. It looks nice, and the presentation features are nice. I am a student, so the fee would only be like $24. I am going to play with it while I have the free trial, and see how I feel about it after 30 days.

I am also downloading Lotus Symphany from IBM right now and we'll see how that goes. I just like having options, and the great folks here keep offering up more and more.

Thanks again to everyone here.