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bonjour2
March 18th, 2012, 06:28 PM
Hello everyone,

as the title of this post says, I don't get the point of Ubuntu. Let me explain.

I just tried Ubuntu on my computer because I really like the philosophy of Linux in general and Ubuntu looks so good. I sometimes get tired of Windows and I won't ever use Mac OS since I believe it is just plain bad.

But the problem is that I don't get WHY I should use Ubuntu over Windows. I don't get the feeling that I'm using something more powerful or productive than Windows. It's certainly not less powerful or productive, but not more it seems. And we all know how, whether you like it or not, Windows has this ''it just works'' philosophy, I mean, you rarely run into hardware or software trouble with Windows. I feel somewhat crippled in Ubuntu because it looks to ME that I don't have all the tools that I have in Windows.

And it looks as if Ubuntu was just there for people that want to look different or for developers, but I don't really want to believe that. I try to tell myself that there must something advantageous in there, but I don't see it.

And believe me, I am really not a Windows fanboy. I believe too in open source software, and diversity. I really WANT to get into Linux for that reason, but just by trying it for an hour or so, clicking on everything to see what it does and how it works, I don't see the advantage of using it. But I LOVE the concept of Linux, believe me.

I am currently studying physics engineering in university and I pass all my time on my computer since all my notes, homeworks and information is on the Internet or in documents. And I believe Windows isn't really good at being productive when you pass all your time on your computer like I do. I heard Linux was more productive but I just CAN'T see why.

Now you guys know where I come from and where I'm going. I'm a science student (my program is more about physics and mathematics than engineering btw) and a complete power user. I tend to multitask a lot and click everywhere quickly and I just can't be (and don't want to be) slowed while working on my things because I get frustrated in the long run (not like banging in the wall lol, but just disappointed a lot).

So my question: is it possible to use Ubuntu as if it was your primary OS and actually be productive with it? Is there anyone who is in a similar situation that can tell me WHY Linux was clearly giving them an advantage over Windows or Mac OS? Are there advantages for a student like me who doesn't have to share a computer with others but isn't a developer either?

Arguments about the way the UI works or the file structure or the applications would be very appreciated. It could convince me that it is possible to power-use this thing and actually be MORE productive.

Thanks! :)

overdrank
March 18th, 2012, 06:32 PM
Not a Ubuntu Testimonials & Experiences moved to Recurring Discussions

winh8r
March 18th, 2012, 06:53 PM
The biggest aid to productivity is how the user manages his or her time, regardless of which OS they are using. There are people using Windows who are more productive in a day than those using Ubuntu and the same is true in reverse also.
Every operating system has good points and bad points, every user is different and has different ways of using their computer , even if it is to achieve the same end result.
The secret is to find an operating system that you are comfortable with and find ways of utilising it to its full potential in order to increase or maintain your productivity.
You will hear many different voices in response to a question like this , but at the bottom of it all is the user.
If a user is focused on their goal and has spent some time researching how to get the best out of their operating system, then they will be productive. If on the other hand the user expects that just by using a particular operating system, they will suddenly become more efficient and productive then they are very much mistaken.
I choose to use only Linux based operating systems , that is because I have found that they are capable of doing eveything that I need to do.
I have also learned that there are often many ways to achieve a particular result and have tried a few in order to find the one which works best for me, not the one which someone else tells me is the "correct" way to do it.
Choose whatever OS you feel comfortable with, focus on what you want to achieve and look at your working practices and alter them for maximum efficiency, regardless of which OS is running in front of you.

pbpersson
March 18th, 2012, 07:10 PM
Here are some ways in which I believe Ubuntu saves me time:

1. If I have 2000 software packages installed on my computer, Ubuntu will automatically send me updates for all my installed packages, not just the OS as Windows does.

2. I will never have to spend time recovering from a virus or worrying about which web sites are safe to surf. I can also open emails without worrying about being infected.

3. I do not have to spend time updating my virus definitions package every so often. I used "Microsoft Windows Essentials" on my Windows 7 machine and it still got infected. I don't have to wonder in Ubuntu if I am using the correct virus protection package.

philinux
March 18th, 2012, 07:11 PM
@bonjour2,

Stick to what works for you. End of.

bonjour2
March 18th, 2012, 07:25 PM
Thanks pbpersson. That's the kind of answer I'm looking for.

I understand it's important to just work with what works for you, but I'd like to know why it works for you. That way I could find out if it could work for me too.

There must be some reasons why you decide to stay with Linux.

philinux
March 18th, 2012, 07:33 PM
There must be some reasons why you decide to stay with Linux.

Simply because it does everything I need. And its free.

Give it a test drive. That's the only way to find out.

Basher101
March 18th, 2012, 07:34 PM
this is probably the most accurate answer i can give

malspa
March 18th, 2012, 07:36 PM
Simply because it does everything I need. And its free.

Money is a big factor. If I can do everything I need to do with Linux, why spend any money supporting Microsoft or Apple? Not only is Linux free, but I can run Linux on a cheap, used, low-spec machine. To me, that's huge.

malspa
March 18th, 2012, 07:37 PM
And I have to agree with Basher101 -- because it's fun!

Basher101
March 18th, 2012, 07:38 PM
Money is a big factor. If I can do everything I need to do with Linux, why spend any money supporting Microsoft or Apple? Not only is Linux free, but I can run Linux on a cheap, used, low-spec machine. To me, that's huge.

not only that, but that you have the possibility to change it entireley to your befittings...now that is a huge thing for me, to be able to have the same Ubuntu version on 2 machines, yet they are so very very different.

CharlesA
March 18th, 2012, 07:42 PM
this is probably the most accurate answer i can give
Bingo.

Basher101
March 18th, 2012, 07:52 PM
Bingo.

yep. One has to find why they use linux for themselves. Just try a few distros, find one you like and you will find a reason (or a couple) for using it.

CharlesA
March 18th, 2012, 07:54 PM
yep. One has to find why they use linux for themselves. Just try a few distros, find one you like and you will find a reason (or a couple) for using it.
Indeed. One of the reasons I use Linux is SSH and rsync. I'm so glad my web host allows ssh access because it makes some things so much easier to fix when you aren't using the web frontend.

MisterGaribaldi
March 18th, 2012, 08:03 PM
Hello everyone,

as the title of this post says, I don't get the point of Ubuntu.

I think it would be more accurate to say you "don't get the point of running Linux in general" because, based on what you said, there's nothing specific to Ubuntu.



Every operating system has good points and bad points, every user is different and has different ways of using their computer , even if it is to achieve the same end result.
The secret is to find an operating system that you are comfortable with and find ways of utilising it to its full potential in order to increase or maintain your productivity.

I couldn't agree with these two particular points more.


You will hear many different voices in response to a question like this , but at the bottom of it all is the user.

Well said!



Here are some ways in which I believe Ubuntu saves me time:

1. If I have 2000 software packages installed on my computer, Ubuntu will automatically send me updates for all my installed packages, not just the OS as Windows does.

2. I will never have to spend time recovering from a virus or worrying about which web sites are safe to surf. I can also open emails without worrying about being infected.

Quite true, though with regards to viruses, as a practical matter, you'd probably be just as safe in Mac OS X or iOS.



this is probably the most accurate answer i can give

See, though, the biggest bugaboo these days with that rationale is that most people who use computers are not technology enthusiasts, any more than most Android community hackers/modders, for instance, aren't science fiction fans. Back when I got into computers, that would not have been the case. But this is 2012, not the late 1980s (or, heck, even the mid 1990s).



Money is a big factor. If I can do everything I need to do with Linux, why spend any money supporting Microsoft or Apple? Not only is Linux free, but I can run Linux on a cheap, used, low-spec machine. To me, that's huge.

Made by those happy-go-lucky, well-paid and well-treated Foxconn workers, right?

aysiu
March 18th, 2012, 08:16 PM
If you don't see a compelling reason to use Ubuntu or Linux, then there's no reason you should use it.

At this point, I use Windows, Mac OS X, and Ubuntu Linux on a regular basis, and I see pros and cons to all three platforms. I'm very much of the philosophy of use what you like and let others use what they like.

In terms of what might make you more productive on Linux, I can think of a few possibilities: It's very easy to create a keyboard shortcut for just about any kind of command you want--it can even be a terminal command. As far as I can tell (without third-party software), you can make keyboard shortcuts in Windows only if they include Control-Alt-something... and then only for programs, and then only sometimes. There may be exceptions I can't think of off the top of my head, but everything is a file or is a configuration in a text file. This means if, for whatever reason, your Ubuntu installation is unbootable, you can boot a live CD and find pretty much any file or change any setting. I don't know that there's an easy way to get files out of the recycling bin in Windows from a live CD... or to edit the registry easily with a live CD. Updates rarely require a reboot in Ubuntu Linux (unless you're upgrading a kernel). I use Windows every day at work, so please no one try to tell me Windows rarely requires a reboot for updates either. Not only does Windows require a reboot often, but the software updates do, too. Adobe Reader has an update? Reboot. Just reinstalled iTunes? Reboot. All that rebooting can certainly negatively affect productivity. Stuck print jobs are easier to delete. I can't tell you how many times in Windows I try to cancel or delete a stuck print job, and it just stays there anyway. If I plug in a new USB stick (one that may actually be old but is new to the Windows computer) in Windows 7, it often has to think and install some mysterious driver just to read mass storage. This takes a good 10-40 seconds to do. Plug the same drive into Ubuntu or Mac OS X, and it shows up instantly, ready to use. That's all I can think of off the top of my head. I'm sure there's more.

I'm not trying to convince you to use Ubuntu. There are plenty of problems Ubuntu has, and there are many, many benefits to using Windows. But if you're asking for practical productivity reasons why someone (not necessarily you) might use Ubuntu over Windows, those are a few.

Mikeb85
March 18th, 2012, 09:02 PM
How Ubuntu is better: More secure (much more!), faster (filesystem is much better), better DE (IMO), free.

How Windows is better: More proprietary software.

I use Ubuntu as much as I can - it multitasks better, the user interface is better, everything just seems to run faster and more efficiently. Libreoffice is more than good enough for my office suite needs, Ubuntu handles all my peripherals with ease, interfaces with my phone, and alot of what I need a computer for is on the internet, so that's no problem.

The only time I ever boot into Windows is to use proprietary software that isn't written for Linux. But if Linux based programs are all you need, there really is no reason to ever use Windows. It's slower, less secure, needs to be de-fragmented all the time - it's simply annoying to use.

cortman
March 18th, 2012, 09:19 PM
I use Ubuntu for a number of different reasons:

I enjoy the intellectual challenge and stimulation of a system you can really get into and edit, configure, and understand. So much of Windows is completely locked away. And don't get me started about Apple.
AND when I want it to "just work" it does. It really does. With every computer I've had, graphics, sound, wireless, everything works flawlessly out of the box. Programs have been rock solid, and performance was great. I didn't realize how much I'd become used to Ubuntu's speed until I booted back into Windows 7 for something.
It has tons of really terrific programs available. And they're all free. I can do things with Ubuntu for free with the ease of legendary Apple products for which I'd pay an arm and leg.
AND if you don't like something about a program, you can change it yourself, or actually get in touch with the developers themselves regarding your suggestion. And nearly all are friendly and willing to listen.
It's secure. I don't worry about viruses at all with Ubuntu.



There's some for you. Use what works; but give Linux a try. :)

CharlesA
March 18th, 2012, 09:22 PM
Why does the "more secure" thing come up so often? Windows, Mac and Linux have around the same security score.

See here for more info:
http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1923727

Most notably post 44 and 46.

rg4w
March 18th, 2012, 09:29 PM
+1 for fun.

An OS is ultimately just an app launcher, and these days they all have far more in common than they have differences, so they're becoming increasingly commoditized. I switch between Ubuntu, Mac, and Windows all day, and functionally they're all pretty much interchangeable, with only relatively minor trade-offs distinguishing them.

This is good for us users: we can now pick based on the most important factor of all, "How much fun am I having?"

:)

Simian Man
March 18th, 2012, 09:33 PM
If I wasn't a programmer, I would see very little reason to use Linux.

winh8r
March 18th, 2012, 09:45 PM
Why does the "more secure" thing come up so often? Windows, Mac and Linux have around the same security score.

See here for more info:
http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1923727

Most notably post 44 and 46.

My thoughts exactly.



There seems to be a lot of misunderstanding on this.

rigel4
March 18th, 2012, 09:50 PM
this is probably the most accurate answer i can give


:ks

kurt18947
March 18th, 2012, 10:12 PM
There are a lot of user interfaces in LinuxWorld. Unity, Gnome shell, KDE, Xfce, LXDE and more can be the 'face' of Ubuntu. Not to mention other 'faces' on other distros. Different people work differently, there's no one best 'one size fits all'. There's no cost except time (and possibly data charges) so do some research and create live CD/DVD/USB installs of those that look interesting.

troymius
March 19th, 2012, 12:36 AM
If I wasn't a programmer, I would see very little reason to use Linux.

Really?

My friend (definitelly not a computer person) uses his computer for purely surfing the web. He was complaining about his Win machine being slow and having occasional issues. I gave him an Ubuntu installation disk (he would not know how to burn an ISO image). He installed it himself, now he uses it almost exclusively and keeps praising it for fast boot, faster surfing and no surprises. He keeps asking me why is it not the world's main operating system. That's another story of course.

Simian Man
March 19th, 2012, 02:08 AM
Really?

My friend (definitelly not a computer person) uses his computer for purely surfing the web. He was complaining about his Win machine being slow and having occasional issues. I gave him an Ubuntu installation disk (he would not know how to burn an ISO image). He installed it himself, now he uses it almost exclusively and keeps praising it for fast boot, faster surfing and no surprises. He keeps asking me why is it not the world's main operating system. That's another story of course.

That's good for your friend, but I find Linux doesn't provide an inherently better experience than Windows. It also greatly limits application choice especially games. Like I said I use it for programming work - it really shines for that. But for general use I don't see the point.

wolfen69
March 19th, 2012, 02:22 AM
There must be some reasons why you decide to stay with Linux.

Because I like it better than anything else. It's a tool to get things done, just like windows or mac. If you need convincing, then perhaps you should stay with what you know.

troymius
March 19th, 2012, 02:36 AM
That's good for your friend, but I find Linux doesn't provide an inherently better experience than Windows. It also greatly limits application choice especially games. Like I said I use it for programming work - it really shines for that. But for general use I don't see the point.

Sometimes I suspect that I don't know how to use Windows (I am not sarcastic, I just make very little effort to improve my Windows skills). I just keep having issues with it. Sometimes I have issues with Linux as well-mainly with applications-but I feel less frustrated because I know they are free and I can usually find a solution quickly.

malspa
March 19th, 2012, 04:18 AM
If I wasn't a programmer, I would see very little reason to use Linux.


Really?

My friend (definitelly not a computer person) uses his computer for purely surfing the web. He was complaining about his Win machine being slow and having occasional issues. I gave him an Ubuntu installation disk (he would not know how to burn an ISO image). He installed it himself, now he uses it almost exclusively and keeps praising it for fast boot, faster surfing and no surprises. He keeps asking me why is it not the world's main operating system. That's another story of course.


That's good for your friend, but I find Linux doesn't provide an inherently better experience than Windows. It also greatly limits application choice especially games. Like I said I use it for programming work - it really shines for that. But for general use I don't see the point.

I'm not a programmer, but I found that I've enjoyed using my computer much more since I started using Linux instead of Windows. I still have to use Windows at work; even if it was free like Linux, I would not want to switch back to it at home. In my mind, Linux definitely provides a better experience than Windows, but of course that's a matter of opinion.

SemiExpert
March 19th, 2012, 04:26 AM
Why does the "more secure" thing come up so often? Windows, Mac and Linux have around the same security score.

See here for more info:
http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1923727

Most notably post 44 and 46.

I really have to disagree. A Unix-like operating system is inherently more secure than Windows - especially for novice users.

SemiExpert
March 19th, 2012, 04:48 AM
That's good for your friend, but I find Linux doesn't provide an inherently better experience than Windows. It also greatly limits application choice especially games. Like I said I use it for programming work - it really shines for that. But for general use I don't see the point.

Actually, Linux shines when it comes to general use. It's only for very specific categories of use, such as PC gaming and industry specific applications, that users have to turn to Windows (or OS X). Got a gaming PC? You're running windows. Running Autocad or CATIA? You're running windows. Do you make your living using Adobe software? Windows, or increasingly, OS X. But for everyday web surfing, productivity software, or even a lot of surprisingly complex tasks, Linux works just fine. It's just a lot safer and easier getting your software and updates from a repository, managing your updates through a single manager than through multiple notifications and popups. On an everyday basis, Windows is simply annoying.

wolfen69
March 19th, 2012, 04:50 AM
Actually, Linux shines when it comes to general use. It's only for very specific categories of use, such as PC gaming and industry specific applications, that users have to turn to Windows (or OS X). Got a gaming PC? You're running windows. Running Autocad or CATIA? You're running windows. Do you make your living using Adobe software? Windows, or increasingly, OS X. But for everyday web surfing, productivity software, or even a lot of surprisingly complex tasks, Linux works just fine. It's just a lot safer and easier getting your software and updates from a repository, managing your updates through a single manager than through multiple notifications and popups. On an everyday basis, Windows is simply annoying.

Well said.

jwbrase
March 19th, 2012, 04:52 AM
Why does the "more secure" thing come up so often? Windows, Mac and Linux have around the same security score.

History. Win 3.x and Win9x earned Windows a reputation that it's had a hard time shedding. There are probably a few elements that actually still are less secure than Linux, but in general it's good enough now that the user's security habits affect things more than the OS itself.

jasonrisenburg
March 19th, 2012, 04:58 AM
I will ask you 2 questions. Do you want viruses?
do you want a open source and free ware with the option of never having to pay for another upgrade?

If not go to windows, or you can do what I do and Dual Boot.

SemiExpert
March 19th, 2012, 05:17 AM
Really?

My friend (definitelly not a computer person) uses his computer for purely surfing the web. He was complaining about his Win machine being slow and having occasional issues. I gave him an Ubuntu installation disk (he would not know how to burn an ISO image). He installed it himself, now he uses it almost exclusively and keeps praising it for fast boot, faster surfing and no surprises. He keeps asking me why is it not the world's main operating system. That's another story of course.

As far as ease of installation and driver support, Linux has come a long way in just the last couple of years. I can honestly say that a GUI installation of Ubuntu is far, far easier than reimaging Windows 7. Can inexperienced users try Ubuntu as a live disc, make sure they have full driver support and then do the installation themselves? YES. Now imagine a novice installing Windows 7, which is easy enough, and then installing drivers in exactly the right sequence, which is far from easy unless you've read the reimaging manual for your PC. Oh, and how about 150 Windows updates when they're done with the installation and drivers. And then and only then do they get to the business of installing actual third party programs - the stuff that actually makes a computer useful. I think that the point of Ubuntu is that it's an easy and accessible solution for users with existing Windows PC hardware.

whatthefunk
March 19th, 2012, 05:52 AM
I use it because to me its easier to understand than Windows. Everything seems more orderly in a Linux machine. I also like being able to customize it to death. I enjoy solving the little problems that come up. Its free...that helps. The software is free. Theres a wide variety of software available. Its very well documented so its easy to find info. There are several good Linux forums (including this one) where you can come for help. Lots of reasons...

QIII
March 19th, 2012, 06:07 AM
I really have to disagree. A Unix-like operating system is inherently more secure than Windows - especially for novice users.

You are free to provide your rationale...

QIII
March 19th, 2012, 06:09 AM
The point of Ubuntu?

Must there be a "point"? What point is there in driving a car?

It's a tool for transporting your fat back side from point A to point B.

Why drive a Ford rather than a Chevy? Who cares?

Drive what you like best or what suits your needs best.

Paqman
March 19th, 2012, 09:43 AM
I feel somewhat crippled in Ubuntu because it looks to ME that I don't have all the tools that I have in Windows.


That's because you're new, and you've got a lot more knowledge and experience of the Windows ecosystem. After you've been using any OS for a while, switching to a new one will always put you at the bottom of a learning curve. After a while you'll learn what tools you need and what is available.

If you'd been using Linux all your life and switched to Windows you'd probably feel exactly the same.

medic2000
March 19th, 2012, 10:18 AM
But the problem is that I don't get WHY I should use Ubuntu over Windows. I don't get the feeling that I'm using something more powerful or productive than Windows.


Time my friend, time. How many years did you use Windows? How many years did you use Ubuntu?

I didn't understand point of it until a certain time. Now i have crossed the line in a fashion that i can't really use Windows anymore. It is over-crippled OS for me now.

You will understand too if you use it enough time. The warmth, the usability, the transparency, the community. Now these are only words but over time with the experience you gained it will turn to feelings.

Windows is always a problem. My girlfriend have to use Photoshop for work, the only reason she got a Windows near an Ubuntu. In past months when i installed Windows, it take for hours and hours. Because it is a netbook with no DVD drive. And booting Windows from USB is a pain.

Then came the drivers. Go to the manufacturer site and download tons of drivers from there. And some of them like Wireless drivers or USB drivers have 2 of them. You can not know which one is for you until you try them!!

Okay at last i installed all of the drivers. But only one of the three USB ports works!! Now comes another pain. Do countless of tricks, hours and hours to no avail.

She used only one USB port, have an USB mouse. She had to unplug mouse to copy something from a USB stick for weeks :mad:

Until last night. I started to search again for this problem. And for a pure chance i encountered a cure on a forum. Guess what?

The two USB drivers given at the manufacturer's site were wrong!!!!! :-x And this is not even mentioned anywhere!! The users on this forum found the manufacturer and give the link. I downloaded the driver and installed and voila!

I can only say to this "WINDOWS JUST DON'T WORK"

In Linux know that everything is very well documented and if something is supported you know it will just works and something is not supported(very rare these days) won't work.



So my question: is it possible to use Ubuntu as if it was your primary OS and actually be productive with it? Is there anyone who is in a similar situation that can tell me WHY Linux was clearly giving them an advantage over Windows or Mac OS?


For me there is no other OS than Linux now. Primary, birincil, primera!

-Easy to use.
-Installing something is very easy.
-No bloating over time.
-Uninstall completely removes everything.
-No registry hell.
-No driver installation. Kernel loads them for you already =) On Windows you even have to wait for mouse driver to be installed if you change USB port. Very primitive.
-Great customizability(that is with my Openbox and Arch installation, shortcuts i say!!)
-No anti-virus crap. Never, never, never!
-No toolbars! =)
-No extra money on Windows, no extra money on Anti-Virus, no extra money on countless programs.
-Great documentation.
-Great community.
-Great power.
-Great flexibility.
-Myriad of use options.
-The operating system is yours!

And the MOST important thing is:

The feeling of sharing, the feeling of "ours", not the products of companies trying desperately sell you their products with countless of ads, their partner's toolbars, programs...Corporate world. Business world. I don't need it when i working on my computer.

Linux is different. Like sitting with your friends near the hot fire and sipping your hot teas whiling talking...

nothingspecial
March 19th, 2012, 10:29 AM
The point of Ubuntu is to be an easily installable and intuitively useable linux distribution. "Linux for human beings"

ojdon
March 19th, 2012, 10:51 AM
There are many reasons to use Ubuntu, but it usually boils down to personal preference.

I personally use Ubuntu since I am a Web and Software developer, so I need assess to all the cross-platform web browsers and tools to ensure that my project works on every platform, obviously I can easily download all the browsers at once using a single command:


sudo apt-get install chromium google-chrome-stable firefox midori opera

In seconds I have all the most popular cross-platform browsers and I'm away!!

Also, I find that when compiling massive open-source projects such as Chromium/Android it can be done with ease compared to, for example, Windows. Which requires a good few minutes (Even hours!) to just set up the environment!!

When I install Ubuntu I can easily remove the programs I don't need using the "apt-get remove" command. Instead of going through sluggish Add/Remove GUIs or having to download a program like CCleaner to remove applications from OSX with ease. Making Ubuntu very clean and snappy from the first hour from the installation without expecting any major slowdowns in the next couple of weeks, which I expect even on my mid-ranged Windows machine!!

Another cruicial point why I use Ubuntu is because the software it offers doesn't cost a single penny. Instead of forking out money for a licence for Windows (Which can be quite hefty without a big income) to use as an Operating System alone! Not to mention then having to pay for large office suites that don't offer features like cloud-saving (Which Google Docs does, a service that doesn't cost a penny!)

You can then go into more advanced stuff like trimming the fat off of the Linux Kernel which will allow you to do some pretty crazy stuff like a boot which lasts under 10 seconds. Can Windows outperform that from a cold boot and not using Hibernation or Sleep? ;)

tldr; You just have to try Ubuntu out for yourself, give yourself time to get used to it's concepts. It's a lot different to the concepts you've seen in Windows. If it's still not your cup of tea, Windows will be happily waiting for you! :)

schtufbox
March 19th, 2012, 10:55 AM
this is probably the most accurate answer i can give

Definitely a +1 for this...it IS fun to mess with the system, and the customisability of Linux is so much better than Windows and Mac etc.

Peripheral Visionary
March 19th, 2012, 10:58 AM
I "inherited" an 8-year-old Dell computer with Xubuntu 10.04 on it. It runs faster and cleaner than my friend's brand new computer with Windows 7! He has used both computers and agrees.

Intrigued by it's speed and performance, he went to the Xubuntu web site, downloaded a copy, asked me to burn it to a CD for him (Nero was off that day or something I guess, lol), and ran it on his Win7 machine. Even from the LiveCD it performed better than his Win7, so he installed it alongside Windows.

He tells me that he seldom even boots into Windows since installing Xubuntu, except when he needs certain software that only runs in Windows.

I think that the point of Ubuntu is to eventually offer a free drop-in replacement for Windows and Mac that is simple enough for most home users and adaptable for advanced users and businesses.

TBABill
March 19th, 2012, 01:04 PM
Here are my reasons why I prefer Ubuntu and other Linux distros to Windows:

I can install the entire OS, complete with all updates and added apps, in 30 minutes. Less if I go with a default install, but I always add Flash, Java, Chromium, codecs and some other goodies. Windows takes hours, particularly if you need a service pack, an office suite, need all your drivers (each added one by one with restarts between). Windows can't touch Linux in terms of speed of install and configuration.

If someone clicks a link on some obscure site on my Linux machine and that link goes to some executable Windows file, nothing happens. It's not security, just safety from error or oversight while surfing since .exe files do not execute/run in Linux.

My machines are faster on Linux. The desktop simply outperforms Windows in terms of speed of application response, loading, switching windows, etc.

I can setup my wireless HP printer in just seconds, not minutes.

Restarts take seconds, not minutes.

Browsing is faster in terms of speed of browser response to scrolling, page loading, DNS lookup.

Choice. I can tweak it to whatever I want quite easily. I can switch distros easily.

It's free.

The communities of many distros are just great for getting help or just discussing various topics.

It actually encourages me to use my machine as I see fit by giving me a boot loader that can manage whatever partition scheme and OS choices I decide to have.

Simian Man
March 19th, 2012, 03:39 PM
Actually, Linux shines when it comes to general use. It's only for very specific categories of use, such as PC gaming and industry specific applications, that users have to turn to Windows (or OS X). Got a gaming PC? You're running windows. Running Autocad or CATIA? You're running windows. Do you make your living using Adobe software? Windows, or increasingly, OS X. But for everyday web surfing, productivity software, or even a lot of surprisingly complex tasks, Linux works just fine. It's just a lot safer and easier getting your software and updates from a repository, managing your updates through a single manager than through multiple notifications and popups. On an everyday basis, Windows is simply annoying.

Playing computer games is not a niche category of use - its a huge entertainment industry. My mom who is over 60 even plays Skyrim :). Besides it's not just games, but nearly all COTS software in addition to many hardware devices that are closed off to you by using Linux. Sure if you just use a web browser, then Linux will work for you but so would a bunch of other things that most people would not consider running day to day like Haiku, VMS, FreeDOS.

I haven't had a problem with viruses since, like Windows 98. Getting updates is slightly more convenient with Linux, but that's hardly a deal-breaker for me. I'm not trying to argue that people should not use Linux if they prefer it. I'm just providing another viewpoint on the matter. For me Linux is a nice work tool but not something that I would run as my main OS.

Erik1984
March 19th, 2012, 04:24 PM
IF you really like the open source philosophy then that's a very good reason to run an open source desktop environment on top of an open source kernel. Windows is not open, so Ubuntu has an advantage there.

Mr. Picklesworth
March 19th, 2012, 04:26 PM
If you're doing engineering with some compsci, you probably understand Python. (If not, you really should look into it. It's excellent).

Python is very nice to use in Ubuntu. It's already installed, it's used in a lot of places, and it's very well integrated. Play with the terminal (https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UsingTheTerminal), fiddle with Python (and ipython or DreamPie). I think you'll find some great ways to be productive with data.

bobbob94
March 19th, 2012, 04:31 PM
I use linux because it's free software, (free as in freedom...)

-The freedom to run the program, for any purpose.
-The freedom to study how the program works and adapt it to your needs.
-The freedom to redistribute copies so you can help others.
-The freedom to improve the program and release your improvements to the public, so that everyone benefits.

Windows and OSX are not free in this sense, so I avoid using them as far as possible.

Erik1984
March 19th, 2012, 05:32 PM
If you're doing engineering with some compsci, you probably understand Python. (If not, you really should look into it. It's excellent).

Python is very nice to use in Ubuntu, because it's used in a lot of places. Play with the terminal (https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UsingTheTerminal), fiddle with Python. I think you'll find some great ways to be productive with data.

And it's already set up with many extra modules like PyGame.

snowpine
March 19th, 2012, 05:43 PM
Many excellent points above. In addition I would add:

Linux has been more flexible (for me) when I've run across challenges/problems. Here are 2 specific examples:

1. My laptop display died. I was able to SSH in to verify that they system and data were still intact, then I simply physically switched the hard drive to a different computer, booted it up, and kept working. (Windows I think would have given me product registration key issues switching to another computer.) Total down-time under 30 minutes.

2. I had some repetitive stress issues a while back. With the help of the Ratpoison windows manager and some command-line apps, I was able to completely eliminate the mouse from my workflow until I was healed. No idea how to accomplish this in Windows; in Linux it was very well documented.

In short, Linux, Windows, Mac are all wonderful operating systems when everything works as expected. I have found that, for my brain/personality, that Linux gives me the power/flexibility to quickly recover when something inevitably goes wrong.

SemiExpert
March 19th, 2012, 09:51 PM
Playing computer games is not a niche category of use - its a huge entertainment industry. My mom who is over 60 even plays Skyrim :).

In comparison to scope of the entire PC industry, PC gaming is just a niche. The average transaction price for a consumer oriented Windows PC is hovering around $500, so high end $1,000 to $4,000 gaming PCs are outside of the mainstream. I'm not denying that PC gaming is one of the healthier Windows PC markets, or that all of the major gaming consoles have become very old. It's just that serious PC gaming is still a niche market within the overall PC industry.
Besides it's not just games, but nearly all COTS software in addition to many hardware devices that are closed off to you by using Linux.

So? If you need a specific Windows or OS X commercial program, dual boot or virtualize Windows, or buy a Mac. If it's platform specific, utilize that platform. It's not a big deal. For most users, there's an entire ecosystem of FOSS apps that you can run on any platform. Actually, the only Windows specific programs that I truly miss on Linux are a couple of very lightweight FreeWare programs.
Sure if you just use a web browser, then Linux will work for you but so would a bunch of other things that most people would not consider running day to day like Haiku, VMS, FreeDOS.

Haiku is still in Alpha after all of these years and OpenVMS is a server OS that hasn't seen a new release in a couple of years. Oh, and FreeDOS? I'm old enough to remember the DOS CLI, and I'm sure there are applications, but it isn't a modern 64-bit operating system. None are comparable to Linux.
I haven't had a problem with viruses since, like Windows 98. Getting updates is slightly more convenient with Linux, but that's hardly a deal-breaker for me. I'm not trying to argue that people should not use Linux if they prefer it. I'm just providing another viewpoint on the matter. For me Linux is a nice work tool but not something that I would run as my main OS.

I think your point of view is that you can't play Windows PC games on Linux. I get it. Linux isn't meant to be a binary compatible alternative to Windows. Actually, I think it's far more important that software is downloaded from a repository, installed through a single GUI interface, and updated from a single update manager, concepts that have been pioneered in Linux, but adopted very quickly by OS X. Who will actually care about buying boxed retail software in another couple of years? Right now, I think Ubuntu provides a very compelling user experience. I even think that OS X provides a compelling experience if you can accept the concept of the OS being largely tied to relatively high-end hardware. Oh, and I also don't think that any Mac is an ideal platform for PC gaming.

snowpine
March 19th, 2012, 10:03 PM
I like playing games too :) but gamers need to understand that the issue is completely irrelevant to a great many Linux users. ;)

SeijiSensei
March 19th, 2012, 10:12 PM
If you'd been using Linux all your life and switched to Windows you'd probably feel exactly the same.

I've used Linux pretty much exclusively for over a decade and can attest to the accuracy of this comment. I can still find my way around Win7, but it sometimes takes quite a while to find the right Control Panel applet or other setting to fix a problem. I also have no clue at this point about software for Windows beyond cross-platform apps like Firefox and Thunderbird. I must say I feel a lot more comfortable installing an application from the repositories than I would installing an application from a download site somewhere.

One reason I use Linux that hasn't been mentioned is the power of the shell. It's just so much easier to write complex scripts in bash, and the array of command-line tools like grep and awk just make things that much easier. I know Windows now has a new scripting environment besides cmd.exe, but it wouldn't be worth my time to learn it. My experience with Linux says that, with enough effort and thought, I can usually figure out how to do most anything from the shell.

wolfen69
March 20th, 2012, 03:43 AM
It seems the OP isn't around anymore.

mamamia88
March 20th, 2012, 06:51 AM
I kind of agree it used to be faster than windows but now it's on par if not slower imo. Of course a different de will change everything. You could say it's more secure but if you know what you are doing and are willing to shell out a little money for software you will be fine. I like it because it's more customizable and free. I hate to say I think ubuntu is more of a hobby os/change of pace os for me.

Simian Man
March 20th, 2012, 04:27 PM
In comparison to scope of the entire PC industry, PC gaming is just a niche. The average transaction price for a consumer oriented Windows PC is hovering around $500, so high end $1,000 to $4,000 gaming PCs are outside of the mainstream. I'm not denying that PC gaming is one of the healthier Windows PC markets, or that all of the major gaming consoles have become very old. It's just that serious PC gaming is still a niche market within the overall PC industry.
You don't need an expensive PC to play games. Mine costed around $600 last year. And gaming was just one common example of things you are very limited with when using Linux. And if you say that gaming is a niche market, then every part of the PC industry is "niche" because gaming is one of the largest.



So? If you need a specific Windows or OS X commercial program, dual boot or virtualize Windows, or buy a Mac. If it's platform specific, utilize that platform. It's not a big deal. For most users, there's an entire ecosystem of FOSS apps that you can run on any platform.
If I want some programs that run on Windows and some free ones that run on all platforms, why in the world would I bother dual-booting or virutualizing? Why not just run one system, Windows, that can run all of the programs I need?



Haiku is still in Alpha after all of these years and OpenVMS is a server OS that hasn't seen a new release in a couple of years. Oh, and FreeDOS? I'm old enough to remember the DOS CLI, and I'm sure there are applications, but it isn't a modern 64-bit operating system. None are comparable to Linux.
Wow, you totally missed my point. You argued that if all someone uses is a web browser, then Linux will work great for them. My point is that virtually every OS out there lets you browse the web including ones like I mentioned that have no business being used as consumer desktop systems. Just because something is the least common denominator of what you need doesn't make it the best choice.




I think your point of view is that you can't play Windows PC games on Linux.
No that was just one example. My point is that I like being able to use commercial software when I want to - including games, while still being able to use open source stuff when it's a better choice. I also like being able to work with virtually any device rather than just the subset that supports Linux. As I mentioned, I do use Linux for work because it makes some things such as programming libraries, source control, and LaTeX publishing quite easy. For normal consumer-level things, however, it's not worth it to me at all.

wojox
March 20th, 2012, 04:39 PM
this is probably the most accurate answer i can give

Good Answer. :KS

Erik1984
March 20th, 2012, 04:39 PM
@ Simian Man: You are right if you disregard the ideological component of FOSS. You look to Linux from a pragmatic viewpoint. I like to dual boot because the idea of running my programs from a Free and Open Source operating system. I know all to well that most users don't care about free software but for me personally it is one of the reasons (also pragmatic reasons) I prefer to use Ubuntu > 90% of the time.

SemiExpert
March 22nd, 2012, 04:05 AM
If I want some programs that run on Windows and some free ones that run on all platforms, why in the world would I bother dual-booting or virutualizing? Why not just run one system, Windows, that can run all of the programs I need?

Well, maybe because Windows is slower to boot, slower to shutdown, takes longer to update, and generally annoys the user with popups related to updates. In short, the annoyance factor is less for Ubuntu.


Wow, you totally missed my point. You argued that if all someone uses is a web browser, then Linux will work great for them.


I never wrote that. I don't know where you got that idea from, but don't attribute it to me.

sheds
March 22nd, 2012, 06:21 AM
Hey SemiExpert, I did notice ubuntu is far less annoying than windows, until I upgraded to oneiric slowcelot. I mean, I would like unity if it wasn't so damn slow. I don't mind using my keyboard to look for some application or settings window I need, in fact I find it easier and faster to just type super and then just type what I need instead of using the somewhat uncomfortable touchpad on my netbook.

Cheers!

asmoore82
March 22nd, 2012, 05:10 PM
Why does the "more secure" thing come up so often? Windows, Mac and Linux have around the same security score

security is a process; not a score.

Windows's process is hopelessly broken because they keep insecure code hanging around since the 3.1 release.
Mac's process is broken because they sit on security updates for known flaws too long.
Linux's process is functional but not idiot-proof.

SemiExpert
March 22nd, 2012, 05:29 PM
Hey SemiExpert, I did notice ubuntu is far less annoying than windows, until I upgraded to oneiric slowcelot. I mean, I would like unity if it wasn't so damn slow. I don't mind using my keyboard to look for some application or settings window I need, in fact I find it easier and faster to just type super and then just type what I need instead of using the somewhat uncomfortable touchpad on my netbook.

Cheers!

I went 64-bit with 11.10. Why? I actually found that for my hardware, the 64-bit version of 11.10 was faster than the 32-bit version, and that Unity was quicker than in 11.04 or 10.10. Not sure why, since I'm running so little RAM on the system. I've made the switch on all of my 64-bit systems. YMMV.

craig10x
March 22nd, 2012, 05:34 PM
And Unity is faster in 12.04 anyway...i have been testing daily build isos and notice the difference from my installed 11.10...and if it is faster on the live session, should be even better when i actually install it next month...:-D

CharlesA
March 22nd, 2012, 06:34 PM
security is a process; not a score.

Windows's process is hopelessly broken because they keep insecure code hanging around since the 3.1 release.
Mac's process is broken because they sit on security updates for known flaws too long.
Linux's process is functional but not idiot-proof.
Yes, I know that. That's pretty much the same thing Haqking and Dangertux said.

Got a source for the "Windows has insecure code from Windows 3.1 days" statement?

aysiu
March 22nd, 2012, 06:46 PM
I think discussions about which platform is more secure are practically useless.

It's like looking at two sculptures that are supposed to be free-standing and then arguing about which one is better constructed so as not to fall over but then not knowing what surface you're going to place the sculptures on! Even if this one's better engineered for standing up straight, plop it on a tilted or slippery surface, and it'll fall over.

Same deal here. You can argue yourself blue that this operating system has this many vulnerabilities or that operating system is less secure. Until you know who's using it, you have no idea the likelihood it will be compromised.

If I were a malware writer, I wouldn't even be looking for system vulnerabilities to exploit. Trojans work every single time.

CharlesA
March 22nd, 2012, 06:48 PM
i think discussions about which platform is more secure are practically useless.

It's like looking at two sculptures that are supposed to be free-standing and then arguing about which one is better constructed so as not to fall over but then not knowing what surface you're going to place the sculptures on! Even if this one's better engineered for standing up straight, plop it on a tilted or slippery surface, and it'll fall over.

Same deal here. You can argue yourself blue that this operating system has this many vulnerabilities or that operating system is less secure. Until you know who's using it, you have no idea the likelihood it will be compromised.

If i were a malware writer, i wouldn't even be looking for system vulnerabilities to exploit. Trojans work every single time.
+1.

adstri
March 22nd, 2012, 07:00 PM
I was a windows user till about 3 years ago and then I discovered Ubuntu and there has been no turning back! There are several reasons why I prefer Ubuntu and Linux as an OS.

1. Command line, fun and v. useful
2. If you don't know how to do something there will be someone out there who will, and they are always willing to help, Microsoft however, there best advice reinstall your OS, not fun.
3. If you "break" Linux it is generally easy to repair or to restore from a back
4. It is much better looking than windows, the fonts and layout much more user friendly
5. Its secure.
6. It has never let me down and crashed when writing an important document unlike windows, useless.

If you haven't tried it then you should, but you have to be prepared to give it the time of day to see its benefits. I bet the first time anyone used Mac OSX or Windows they had to get there head around it any Linux distro is the same. When you realize what you can do, then it is almost completely customizable.

System updates do not take control of your computer or insist that you do a restart everything is user controlled!

:)

haqking
March 22nd, 2012, 07:31 PM
can someone write "linux is more secure" one more time please, my head is about to explode and i could do with releasing the pressure and i think one more post should do the trick.

Cheers

CharlesA
March 22nd, 2012, 07:36 PM
can someone write "linux is more secure" one more time please, my head is about to explode and i could do with releasing the pressure and i think one more post should do the trick.

Cheers
Linux is more secure. :p

The only way for a computer to be 100% secure is to be buried in concrete and sitting on the bottom of the ocean. Oh and it has to be disconnected from the internet..

haqking
March 22nd, 2012, 07:44 PM
Linux is more secure. :p

The only way for a computer to be 100% secure is to be buried in concrete and sitting on the bottom of the ocean. Oh and it has to be disconnected from the internet..

cheers appreciate it.

I have taken some narcotics and cracked open my single malt now to ease the pain ;-)

synaptix
March 22nd, 2012, 09:00 PM
Oh and it has to be disconnected from the internet..

And all it takes then is an infected floppy/cd/dvd/usb/etc.

CharlesA
March 22nd, 2012, 09:03 PM
And all it takes then is an infected floppy/cd/dvd/usb/etc.
You'd have to get thru the concrete first. ;)

jwbrase
March 22nd, 2012, 09:59 PM
And all it takes then is an infected floppy/cd/dvd/usb/etc.

There's one critical element CharlesA forgot: In addition to being disconnected from the internet, the computer must also be disconnected from all sources of electrical power.

haqking
March 22nd, 2012, 10:07 PM
There's one critical element CharlesA forgot: In addition to being disconnected from the internet, the computer must also be disconnected from all sources of electrical power.

there are not many outlets inside a concrete block at the bottom of the ocean ;-)

snowpine
March 22nd, 2012, 10:11 PM
Electric eels. With bluetooth dongles.

CharlesA
March 22nd, 2012, 10:12 PM
Electric eels. With bluetooth dongles.
Wow, eels like to use hax!

QIII
March 22nd, 2012, 10:36 PM
Even now, a nefarious US Government agency is training electric eels to use bluetooth dongles.

KiwiNZ
March 22nd, 2012, 11:28 PM
Do what you will with any OS and Security. The primary vulnerability is that which is usually 20 centimeters from the keyboard.

sheds
March 23rd, 2012, 06:23 AM
And Unity is faster in 12.04 anyway...i have been testing daily build isos and notice the difference from my installed 11.10...and if it is faster on the live session, should be even better when i actually install it next month...:-D

Hell, I will install it next month too! Hopefully it will fix this slowness issue.

asmoore82
March 23rd, 2012, 04:58 PM
Got a source for the "Windows has insecure code from Windows 3.1 days" statement?

Yes — I'm sitting on it.

LMGTFY:


Users of Microsoft Windows 98, Me, NT 4.0, 2000 or XP should update their systems to patch a vulnerability immediately.http://www.datadoctors.com/help/question/6951-Critical-Security-flaw-in-Microsoft-Windows-/


The bug affects Windows XP and all versions of Windows released since, including the developer preview of Windows 8.http://arstechnica.com/business/news/2012/03/remote-desktop-bug-in-windows-makes-worm-meat-of-high-value-machines.ars

There's 2 in 2 seconds. That is, security holes in ancient Windows that somehow still effect the newer "built-with-security-in-mind" versions.

jwbrase
March 23rd, 2012, 08:38 PM
Do what you will with any OS and Security. The primary vulnerability is that which is usually 20 centimeters from the keyboard.

Which is why we do our best to asphyxiate that vulnerability. Why do you think we've got the computer at the bottom of several thousand feet of very unbreathable water?

bfmetcalf
March 23rd, 2012, 08:56 PM
I use it as my primary OS at home. It does all I need it to do and then some. I have a lot of fun tinkering and breaking as said in the attachment someone posted above. I use ArchLinux simply because I enjoyed installing with nothing but CLI and then adding only what I want and making it work through command line. My work computer is a little different. I use a lot of CAD/CAM programs which just aren't there on Linux for me (still have some research to do on BRLCad as that is what the military uses). The point is I just like it. I can get around much easier than in Windows 7 (which I have on a second hard drive for my wife to use) and as stated before, I don't have to worry about being "infected"

Just my $.02 :D

madjr
March 23rd, 2012, 11:16 PM
i moved 5 years ago from XP to ubuntu and my productivity increased a lot.

not only that i had PEACE of mind (priceless for me). No need to maintain, defrag, slow downs and worry about security and spyware.

today i have a computer with win7 and i must agree is a bit better on security, but i still prefer ubuntu over it and thus i rarely use win7 (if at all).

of course it depends on your conception, needs, etc..

and with cars is the same concept, maybe I am more productive with a Car and you with your "pickup truck". Everyone's needs are different, that' why we have choice.

"for different tastes different colors were made"

CharlesA
March 24th, 2012, 01:43 AM
Yes I'm sitting on it.

LMGTFY:

http://www.datadoctors.com/help/question/6951-Critical-Security-flaw-in-Microsoft-Windows-/

http://arstechnica.com/business/news/2012/03/remote-desktop-bug-in-windows-makes-worm-meat-of-high-value-machines.ars

There's 2 in 2 seconds. That is, security holes in ancient Windows that somehow still effect the newer "built-with-security-in-mind" versions.

Both have been patched. The same can be said for OSX and *nix. Vulnerabilities are found and fixed.

asmoore82
March 26th, 2012, 02:19 PM
Both have been patched. The same can be said for OSX and *nix.
Got a source for that statement? Especially for that vulnerability that's present in WinXP all the way through Win8 Preview. Can the same really be said? Got a security flaw that was shipping in a Linux Distro *10* **years** ago that's still in a shipping Beta?


Both have been patched.
Another concern is "patched" Yes but patched where? By the vendor but actually in the wild too? That's where you get into Linux's security *process* being a lot better. It's partially the end user's responsibility, but for whatever the reasons, what's better is still better.

Retlol
March 30th, 2012, 10:47 AM
But the problem is that I don't get WHY I should use Ubuntu over Windows.

You don't have to use it. Simple.

Linux does certain things better, Windows does certain things better.

Both do most things good.

Being different than others is also a valid reason to use it.