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Jonnyuk1133
March 11th, 2012, 03:09 AM
Hey guys, basically went to a job interview last week and as asked about linux and was totally stuck.... They said afterwards its a area I should approve... Anyway I've always been interested and was wondering where the best to start... I know I will mount it onto a USB drive and boot from there but what's the best way to teach yourself the commands and interface ? Any help would be great...

rattskjelke
March 11th, 2012, 03:20 AM
The most help in learning that I have found is the forums on the various distro web sites (Ubuntu, Linux Mint, Fedora, etc.) like this one right here that you are reading right now.

Most of the sub forums have sticky posts at the beginning like this one... http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1909108 that have links to lots of good web sites.

Bucky Ball
March 11th, 2012, 03:25 AM
Welcome!

Download the ISO (I recommend 10.04 LTS as is very stable), burn it to a CD and try it from there. Much easier for starters than USB method.

http://www.ubuntu.com/download/ubuntu/download

Scour the forums and the internet for all information and feel free to ask questions here. That is the purpose of this community. ;)

Just get to know your way around for the moment, worry about the terminal later. With a stable system you shouldn't have to dabble with the terminal too much but it is VERY handy to be familiar with it.

Always search first before posting, though. Just append 'Ubuntu' to your search. For instance:

http://au.search.yahoo.com/search?p=terminal%20commands%20ubuntu&fr=altavista&fr2=sfp

There's a few useful ones here also, and a few duplicates from the last link:

http://au.search.yahoo.com/search;_ylt=A0oGkmD7DVxPxycA4hwL5gt.?p=terminal%20 commands%20list%20ubuntu&fr2=sb-top&fr=altavista&rd=r1

A tip for posting on the forums: ALWAYS use a descriptive title for your problem/issue/question and provide as much info as you can about your problem/issue/question and relevant hardware/software. This will help us help you (and the descriptive title will get you more help).

When you get stuck let us know.

Good luck!

Bobhuber
March 11th, 2012, 03:27 AM
Hey guys, basically went to a job interview last week and as asked about linux and was totally stuck.... They said afterwards its a area I should approve... Anyway I've always been interested and was wondering where the best to start... I know I will mount it onto a USB drive and boot from there but what's the best way to teach yourself the commands and interface ? Any help would be great...
Read the forums. Read the posts. Read some more. Load the system. Screw it up. Fix it.
Most of all have fun and don't get frustrated. Quite a change from windows.

sffvba[e0rt
March 11th, 2012, 03:30 AM
As has been mentioned, get a copy and try it out (you can run most distro's directly from the CD/DVD/USB without installing). Do your normal every day activities in Linux, when you get stuck search or ask for advice.

Once you feel more confident perhaps do a dual boot with Windows, then you can really start tweaking and playing and learning.

Good luck, it is an awesome ride :)


404

Bucky Ball
March 11th, 2012, 03:35 AM
as has been mentioned, get a copy and try it out (you can run most distro's directly from the cd/dvd/usb without installing). Do your normal every day activities in linux, when you get stuck search or ask for advice.

Once you feel more confident perhaps do a dual boot with windows, then you can really start tweaking and playing and learning.

Good luck, it is an awesome ride :)


404

+1. ;)

I was also curious once. I satisfied that curiosity five years ago and it has been an awesome ride!

Jonnyuk1133
March 11th, 2012, 03:52 AM
Brilliant guys, thanks for the response ... I'm looking forward to this ride which hopefully will lead onto getting this job next year ...

troymius
March 11th, 2012, 04:47 AM
By the way... thank you for posting your experience. A few years ago I asked our department's IT lead whether they considered Linux for certain systems. He looked at his IT colleagues, smiled and said "here is a career-ending question!". He as well as our former CIO are out... and Linux is in. It powers our high performance computing cluster and other systems.

Jonnyuk1133
March 11th, 2012, 05:14 AM
By the way... thank you for posting your experience. A few years ago I asked our department's IT lead whether they considered Linux for certain systems. He looked at his IT colleagues, smiled and said "here is a career-ending question!". He as well as our former CIO are out... and Linux is in. It powers our high performance computing cluster and other systems.

lol to be honest ive always had an interest in the operating system but never saw how it could benefit my career... until i looked like an idiot when linux questions came up in an interview... this interview is for a very large IT company worldwide ... and the role was for software testing so... yeah im going apply next year and brush up on key elements of my knowledge!! and enjoy this very interesting OS... by the way are you running linux server now within your company?

troymius
March 11th, 2012, 05:29 AM
We have linux servers but I am not sys admin. I just use them for my engineering applications.

Bucky Ball
March 11th, 2012, 06:09 AM
... by the way are you running linux server now within your company?

Unix is everywhere in server world. Linux hybrid lovechild of Unix. ;) (see Linus Torvalds (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linus_Torvalds))

And see THIS (http://au.search.yahoo.com/search?p=unix%20linux%20relation&fr=altavista&fr2=sfp) for relationships between the two.

ixtok
March 11th, 2012, 07:43 AM
Unix is everywhere in server world. Linux hybrid lovechild of Unix. ;)

Isn't Mac OS X also?

Bucky Ball
March 11th, 2012, 07:48 AM
Isn't Mac OS X also?

Yes. Mac based on Unix and has terminal like Ubuntu also. ;)

From Wikipedia:


Mac OS X (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/8a/Loudspeaker.svg/11px-Loudspeaker.svg.png / (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:IPA_for_English)ˈ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:IPA_for_English#Key)m (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:IPA_for_English#Key) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:IPA_for_English#Key)k (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:IPA_for_English#Key) ˌ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:IPA_for_English#Key)oʊ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:IPA_for_English#Key) ˌ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:IPA_for_English#Key)ɛ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:IPA_for_English#Key)s (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:IPA_for_English#Key) ˈ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:IPA_for_English#Key)t (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:IPA_for_English#Key)ɛ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:IPA_for_English#Key)n (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:IPA_for_English#Key)/ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:IPA_for_English))[8] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Osx#cite_note-ten_not_x-7) is a series of Unix (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unix)-based operating systems (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operating_system) and graphical user interfaces (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graphical_user_interface) developed, marketed, and sold by Apple Inc. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apple_Inc.)

ubuntu27
March 11th, 2012, 09:37 AM
For those new to Linux:

50 Places Linux is Running That You Might Not Expect (http://www.focus.com/fyi/50-places-linux-running-you-might-not-expect/)

kaldor
March 11th, 2012, 10:08 AM
If you're learning Linux from a career perspective, I highly recommend learning everything you can about Enterprise Linux (EL).

Red Hat is a major Linux company, and is a perfect example of how the Linux ecosystem works. It works like this...

1) Fedora Linux Project is sponsored by Red Hat. It is made up of a community of developers and users who make it what it is. It works with upstream software developers to bring fixes to everyone in the open source community. Every ~6 months there's a new release of Fedora Linux. It is bleeding edge, and shows the very latest in open source development and innovation.

2) Every few years, Red Hat (the company) takes a stable version of Fedora Linux (eg., Fedora 12 + 13 = RHEL 6) and forks it into Red Hat Enterprise Linux. They patch it up, add features which will benefit enterprise customers, and eventually release it as a paid subscription-based OS. The OS is then supported over a period of years via updates. It's designed to be extremely stable and suitable for mission-critical uses.

3) Due to the Free Software licenses, Red Hat has all of their packages available in source form. This allows anybody to build a "clone" of Red Hat Enterprise Linux by building all of the packages into a distribution. To avoid legal issues, all trademarks (etc) of Red Hat must be removed. Examples of Enterprise Linux clones are CentOS and Scientific Linux. CentOS and SL typically follow the same release cycle as EL.

4) Rinse & Repeat.

Basically, if you want to learn about Linux in a way which will prepare you in the workforce, learning to wield the Enterprise Linux distributions will probably go the farthest. My recommendation is to install the latest version of Fedora on your desktop systems and use them as much as possible. Then, work on using either Scientific Linux or CentOS for servers. Use Linux (and use the Command Line) as much as possible. When learning Linux, the best thing to do is to totally dive in and immerse yourself. This will force you to learn how to fix problems and transfer your current skills to Linux. I don't recommend using a Virtual Machine; a real installation will be more realistic.

Ubuntu is based on the Debian GNU/Linux project. Learning about Ubuntu is a great skill, but not all skills will transfer onto Enterprise Linux. If you're using Linux at a job, chances are they're using an EL setup of some sort. EL should be priority.

---


Nutshell: Try to use Linux as much as you can for your daily tasks. Familiarize yourself with Fedora and an EL clone such as Scientific Linux. Ubuntu's fine, but some skills won't be 100% transferable to the common Enterprise systems.

Links for Fedora and SL are in my signature.

Bucky Ball
March 11th, 2012, 10:37 AM
kaldor gives good advice, but perhaps before taking the suggested trajectory maybe enquire with the company as to what Linux distribution they use. (This will also give them a good impression of your enthusiasm, desire to learn and let them know you are serious and mean business when it comes to joining their business.) ;)

TBerk
March 11th, 2012, 05:03 PM
re: Job Interviews and Linux... It's funny the looks you get when you start talking Command Line familiarity, going back to DOS and CP/M.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CP/M

mastablasta
March 11th, 2012, 06:09 PM
Ubuntu is based on the Debian GNU/Linux project. Learning about Ubuntu is a great skill, but not all skills will transfer onto Enterprise Linux. If you're using Linux at a job, chances are they're using an EL setup of some sort. EL should be priority.
.


Well they just might be using Ubuntu.

Anyway Ubuntu is also ment for businesses (the LTS), then SUSE also has Enteprise linux.

i guess these 3+Red hat are the most popular ones. Debian is also on many userver across the net.