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ubunt10
March 8th, 2012, 11:13 PM
I have installed Ubuntu to learn about it. For me, it is just a hobby and I am hoping will yield basic skills that hiring managers want. (I am interested in web development.) Other than the fact that Ubuntu is free, what are the advantages to using it? What is the point?

Do more games play on it? Is it better for graphics? Does the fact that it is open source mean that there is transparency and corporations can not sneak tracking software into it? Is it a rebellion against capitalism or a protest to corporate corruption? Is it only better for computer programmers and those who wish to run a server?

With Firefox and Chrome, I can see source codes of a particular web page section just by highlighting and right-clicking. I have more power for development and can search more efficiently. In a similar sense, is there an analogy between Firefox vs Internet Explorer and Ubuntu vs Windows?

grahammechanical
March 8th, 2012, 11:18 PM
Ubuntu is not in a war with anybody.

This is why there is a Ubuntu

http://www.ubuntu.com/project/about-ubuntu

Regards.

TeoBigusGeekus
March 8th, 2012, 11:21 PM
>>>>

jerome1232
March 8th, 2012, 11:24 PM
>>>>

The truth! A lot of the people here on these forums (including me) considers this stuff a hobby.

critin
March 8th, 2012, 11:27 PM
I have installed Ubuntu to learn about it. For me, it is just a hobby and I am hoping will yield basic skills that hiring managers want. (I am interested in web development.) Other than the fact that Ubuntu is free, what are the advantages to using it? What is the point?

Do more games play on it? Is it better for graphics? Does the fact that it is open source mean that there is transparency and corporations can not sneak tracking software into it? Is it a rebellion against capitalism or a protest to corporate corruption? Is it only better for computer programmers and those who wish to run a server?

With Firefox and Chrome, I can see source codes of a particular web page section just by highlighting and right-clicking. I have more power for development and can search more efficiently. In a similar sense, is there an analogy between Firefox vs Internet Explorer and Ubuntu vs Windows?

Google the question for many more. Governments, DOD for instance.

http://www.aaxnet.com/design/linux2.html

You've answered your own question about the advantages.



Other than the fact that Ubuntu is free, what are the advantages to using it? What is the point?
to learn about it gain skills...deflect boredom while having fun.

TeoBigusGeekus
March 8th, 2012, 11:32 PM
Also read this (http://www.3till7.net/2005/11/01/everyone-uses-linux/) - old but good.

EDIT: And that was 7 years ago...

critin
March 8th, 2012, 11:40 PM
Also read this (http://www.3till7.net/2005/11/01/everyone-uses-linux/) - old but good.

Enjoyed the read, thanks...

acimi66
March 8th, 2012, 11:43 PM
You had me at FREE...

andrew.46
March 8th, 2012, 11:44 PM
>>>>

Exactly, I also do it because it is a huge amount of fun :).

JayKay3OOO
March 8th, 2012, 11:50 PM
I use it because a friend showed me it and I figured it was time to diversify and learn mac, linux & windows.

In the end I found I liked using my computer with Linux on it.

It's not a hobby or anything to me. An operating is a tool for productivity and Linux serves this need a bit like all cars have 4 wheels and an engine so why not everyone use the same car?

Mines blue because I like blue and it has a small engine because I don't have a tun of money and it's small because I don't need loads of stuff with me every day. Every car works the same though. They all look and feel a bit different and their controls are sometimes where you would least expect them. An operating system is no different.

I use the forums now and again because it's interesting to see how new users are adapting and whether they are having the same thought process as I was.

Know that I have liked and hated Linux in equal measure. I have vowed never to use it again and happily used Windows for a time. Though here I am, I find myself selling my windows computer and going towards the mobile market. Linux will serve the laptop now.

I shall, however use the operating system that works best for me or comes with supplied hardware. Do I love Linux? No. It is just a tool just like I don't love my car even though I have to protect it like I love it.

To that end I love people. Linux is a community of people and that is what I love.

MBybee
March 8th, 2012, 11:57 PM
I think the #1 advantage in my book is that it stays out of the way.

I like an OS that stays out of the way.

The best part is you can determine exactly how much or how little OS you have, and Ubuntu is just about the easiest out there to tweak when you don't want to put a lot of effort into making something work. 99% of the time, if you read about a cool utility, toy, or hack, it'll work on Ubuntu.

You can run it on almost every machine you own and it will perform reasonably well. When you find something that doesn't work well, Ubuntu has probably the most user friendly community of any OS.

ubunt10
March 9th, 2012, 12:24 AM
Wow. This quickly got a lot of great replies. I am glad I asked.

Basher101
March 9th, 2012, 12:28 AM
>>>>

the exact reason i started using it, could not have said it better. mind if i copy the picture?

TeoBigusGeekus
March 9th, 2012, 12:29 AM
could not have said it better. mind if i copy the picture?

Go ahead...

Basher101
March 9th, 2012, 12:31 AM
Go ahead...
appreciated

phrak
March 9th, 2012, 01:25 AM
I can only speak for myself but,

I use linux (xubuntu) on my boys laptop because it allows me better control over what my 6 and 8 year old children are doing with it. Also, said laptop is approaching 7 years old and has a really hard time pushing many programs. Xfce runs very nicely on it and still allows my boys access to a few of the websites they want to play on. (also, they get a kick out of me ssh'ing to their machine while they're using it.)

I use linux (arch) on my laptop because I prefer a mouse-free experience. My laptop is a little older, but it will run games like WoW or SW:TOR just fine, but when on the move I prefer not needing to carry and/or use a mouse. I also use it to connect to my home and work servers.

I use linux (debian) on my home server because it's stable as all get out. The tower is ancient (don't remember the processor but I think it's a celeron and it might have 256mb of ram) but doesn't need to be powerful to serve files and stream the occasional movie or music to my tv.

I use linux (debian) at work because the boss said so.

My wife uses Windows because she likes it and it works for her.
I use linux because I like it and it works for me. I also use a Mac (hand me down) for picture editing because it works well for that.

The last two lines are really the entire point of this post. If you want to learn, grab a live cd and give it a whirl. If you want to play, do the same. No one can really provide a reason for you to use linux though.

theducksfan2010
March 9th, 2012, 04:29 AM
>>>>

So true!

Still a complete Noob, but love learning, fixing, improving, hate breaking, but always do, and then have fun getting it fixed all over again. Glad I have multiple systems to work with, keeps at least one always safe and fully functional, lol.

theducksfan2010
March 9th, 2012, 04:31 AM
Go ahead...

Mind if i put it on FB??

pbpersson
March 9th, 2012, 04:43 AM
There are some who use Linux because they do not want to support a company that blatantly breaks the law in several countries because they think they are above the law and all that matters is getting richer at the expense of others.

Also these people don't like some company telling them when and how they can use their computers - for instance, calling a company and begging them to be able to install the OS they bought on a new computer when the old one stopped working.

I can download Ubuntu for free, install it on every computer in the house - all seven of them - and no one will care. That I love!

BBQdave
March 9th, 2012, 05:00 AM
If you want to learn, grab a live cd and give it a whirl. If you want to play, do the same. No one can really provide a reason for you to use linux though.

+1

And too, I think if you explore GNU/Linux you will find that the programs offered are powerful tools that are evolving. You get the chance to grow with the development of these programs.

Coming from a Mac world, it was disheartening to have systems and hardware abandoned by Apple, as well as, functionality removed from software I depended on. No freedom to change that, just a consumer.

Now I am part of the GNU/Linux community, contributing and receiving. With the most stable OS I have ever used (Debian 6). And I benefit from solid programs (that gain functionality) for desktop and web publishing. I too, have set up different organizations with Ubuntu and Xubuntu in office and education settings.

It is amazing what you gain when you are allowed to participate and grow VS just consuming.

bodhi.zazen
March 9th, 2012, 05:21 AM
Thread moved to The Community Cafe.

souravc83
March 9th, 2012, 05:22 AM
I use it because of a very practical reason.
My windows system is infected with virus, and slow as hell. It takes 10 mins to load (had always taken forever to load), and vista keeps on taking more space and more ram.
I was at the point of throwing my 3 yr old laptop and buying a macbook. I decided to give Ubuntu a try, and worked like a charm.
I had used linux long time back, that was Fedora, back in 2003 methinks. I can use command line for simple things, but I faced a lot of problems with drivers, flash etc. and gave up on it.
Coming back to linux after so many years, I find things have improved a lot. Ubuntu is much much more user friendly to the noob. Wubi is an excellent thing. I tried it out for a month, and was sold out to the linux idea. Finally, I converted.
The only thing that worries me is that I cannot use Microsoft Office, which others in my lab use, and hence I am forced to use, in order to collaborate. I think I will install office with wine and use it. The Libreoffice just doesn't cut it for me. Except that, I am much happier with linux.
Also, another reason I wanted to make a shift is because, programming is easier with linux. Its actually much more difficult to install things like Boost library for C++ or OpenCV with windows than it is with linux. Like the windows command line will close after the C++ program is executed, seriously! I felt like I am doing something which I am not supposed to do with this system. Linux is much more programmer friendly, I think.

not found
March 9th, 2012, 06:26 AM
Thread moved to Recurring Discussions.


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cariboo
March 9th, 2012, 07:33 AM
I use Ubuntu, because for me I find it easier to use on a daily basis than Windows. It takes me about an hour post install to set things up, then I can use it, and basically forget it's there. No scanning for malware, no defragging the hard drive, and not being able to use the system while updates are in progress, because of multiple reboots.

I run the latest pre-release versions, and update 2 -3 times a day, I've never been forced to reboot the system, so most of the updates don't come into effect until I start up my system the next day

To the OP, if you are using Ubuntu, to learn Linux, you are using the wrong distribution, although Mark Shuttleworth says in his latest blog post that Ubuntu is creeping into enterprise/government (see here (http://www.markshuttleworth.com/archives/1056)), the majority of big businesses still use RedHat, so you should be using Fedora and CentOS, especially if you want to make your resume look better.

not found
March 9th, 2012, 07:36 AM
Having tried Microsoft's attempt at integrating various social features into Windows 8 I am very happy to be using Ubuntu and Unity and the way it handles this... by far a better experience for me :)

And that is just one little advantage... as the OP has seen there are many different ones for many different people.


404

lisati
March 9th, 2012, 08:02 AM
I having been using Ubuntu for my day-to-day stuff (email, surfing etc) since 2007 because I like it. There are a number of reasons, including communities such as this one, and how its security model in some ways makes it easier to avoid some of the problems associated with malware.

I also use Ubuntu server edition to host my own web site and email server, because it offers a greater degree of control over administrative tasks than using a hosted service.

There's also the satisfaction of having learned something new and being able to contribute the experience of others from what I learn.

souravc83
March 9th, 2012, 08:25 AM
Completely agree with Cariboo on the updates thing.
This windows rebooting by default after some idiotic update just used to get on my nerves. I? would be in the middle of something, and suddenly the computer would reboot.
I mean why?
Glad that I am outta it.

TeoBigusGeekus
March 9th, 2012, 10:11 AM
Mind if i put it on FB??

No problem.

rg4w
March 9th, 2012, 03:38 PM
I think TeoBigusGeekus' Post #3 (http://ubuntuforums.org/showpost.php?p=11749755&postcount=3) summed up the big advantages perfectly. :)

For myself, I like Linux because it's fun. That's highly subjective, and of course YMMV, but the flexibility allows me to tailor it any way I want, while providing the security and robustness to let me get a day's work done with confidence.

For web development I've found Linux especially helpful. Much, if not most, of the Internet is driven by Linux servers, and having the same core OS on my desktop as on my server means that what I learn for one directly helps me understand the other.

Along the way I've gained a greater sense of self-reliance. What I've learned diving into Linux has helped me better understand so much about computers in general that now I'm looking to build my next PC from parts. There's an infinite amount a hungry mind can learn, and Linux is open enough to make it easy and fun.

Not long after I got hooked I picked up Kyle Rankin's Ubuntu Server Book and converted one of the old PCs in my office to a test server. Now I have a good system for playing around with any exotic server stuff I want, and I never need to worry about annoying my web hosting company - if I break something it's only in my office, and once I get it working well I can deploy it to my web host easily.

So much you can do with Linux it's almost overwhelming. I think you're about to have a very good time.

Best of all, you've already discovered one of the finest things about Ubuntu: this forum.

Linux is fun tech, but IMO the community is even better. Something almost magic happens when people gather for the primary purpose of freely sharing stuff. The Linux gatherings I've been to have been some of the best social events I attend, so easy to make new friends while learning tons of useful stuff along the way.

flyfishingphil
March 9th, 2012, 04:43 PM
You ask what's so great about Linux so here's a few reasons I run it only.

First, I'm about as good at computer programming as politicians are about doing what they promised during the election. Programming is a foreign language to me but there has never been a problem finding answers, and help in performing those efforts, on the forum.

Second, I tried Ubuntu because of major virus and other problems in Windo$. Lots of help setting up Ubuntu and have not had a single virus, trojan or other problem since I changed over.

Third is the speed of operation. From installation to updates it seems to run much faster than it did using Windo$.

Fourth is the availability of programming. Operating a business, keeping tax records, building websites, doing photo work, and everything else I do, has cost nothing using Ubuntu. In other OS's I'd have several thousand $ tied up and would still be facing the fun of viruses, or other threats, that could (and do) destroy those same programs.

Finally, the friendliness of the others you find in the forum. Despite my lack of knowledge on program writing I have never been treated like a total idiot by anyone here. That includes when I have had to ask about how something is done and get a "gentle" reminder to enter that info in Terminal. (Go to Applications > Accessories > Terminal and post it in there.)

Finally, it is knowing that, although just a user, I am part of a community that actually cares about what it does and is willing to take the time to share their efforts with others. Not in it for the money that can be made but in it for the joy of doing and sharing. Even with my limited ability I've had the opportunity to help others get another step or two ahead of where they were.

A side benefit is that, sometimes, you can't find a program to do exactly what you want and that calls on the user to figure out other ways to "get there from here". Once you have done this the whole system becomes an exploring event that is not available in other OS's. I've spent hours experimenting, and getting to the point that I have no idea on where I am, and not being worried about the cost factor of what I have done.

Ubuntu! Loving it and getting itchy waiting for 12.04!!!!!!

phrak
March 10th, 2012, 03:39 AM
The only thing that worries me is that I cannot use Microsoft Office, which others in my lab use, and hence I am forced to use, in order to collaborate. I think I will install office with wine and use it. The Libreoffice just doesn't cut it for me. Except that, I am much happier with linux.

Have you tried google docs or office.com's web apps? I used a combination of both for my Technical Writing class a few semesters ago and no one knew the difference.

wolfen69
March 12th, 2012, 06:30 PM
The biggest advantage of using ubuntu/linux for me, is that I feel comfortable using it as opposed to the other operating systems out there. It stays out of my way, and is smooth. That's an advantage right there.

After doing a couple hundred linux installs, it's not really fun for me to "tweak" any more. I just like to use it for what I need, and move on with my life. The only thing I change after an install is my wallpaper. I did go through that stage though, for a while. Now I just want to use it, and leave the tweaking and breaking to the young guns. ;)

I do however, help testing new releases because it's my way of giving back for such a wonderful OS.

MBybee
March 12th, 2012, 09:45 PM
The biggest advantage of using ubuntu/linux for me, is that I feel comfortable using it as opposed to the other operating systems out there. It stays out of my way, and is smooth. That's an advantage right there.

After doing a couple hundred linux installs, it's not really fun for me to "tweak" any more. I just like to use it for what I need, and move on with my life. The only thing I change after an install is my wallpaper. I did go through that stage though, for a while. Now I just want to use it, and leave the tweaking and breaking to the young guns. ;)

I do however, help testing new releases because it's my way of giving back for such a wonderful OS.

I sure agree with that! I actually saved my .profile and .gnome/etc files for the longest time so every machine I used "felt" the same.

TeamRocket1233c
March 13th, 2012, 01:17 AM
Linux distros are usually pretty good about staying outta the way and being actually really easy to use for the most part.

The easiest to use DE's, in my opinion, that I've tested, are probably GNOME 2, GNOME 3 Fallback, Xfce, LXDE, and Openbox. GNOME 3 Shell's in the middle. Hadn't tested Unity, KDE, Cinnamon, or MATE yet, but would like to.

No real opinion on Fluxbox, FLWM, or JWM though.