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trivialpackets
March 5th, 2012, 03:02 PM
I realize that this is likely a recurring discussion, and since I can't post from there to begin with, I just want to get some suggestions on some sort of an alternative desktop environment.

I have used ubuntu with gnome for a long time. Since the unity switch, I find myself distrohopping a bit, and I don't like it. Not really content in gnome-shell, unity or kde at this point. Any thoughts? Maybe the new gnome-shell fallback will do the trick. Time will tell I guess.

TeamRocket1233c
March 5th, 2012, 03:10 PM
1) My personal fave, Openbox.
2) LXDE.
3) XFCE.
4) Gnome 2 or Gnome Shell's Fallback Mode.
5) JWM.
6) FLWM.
7) IceWM.
8 ) Cinnamon.

keithpeter
March 5th, 2012, 03:13 PM
Hello eric.proctor and all

Certainly is a recurring discussion, and perhaps there ought to be a sticky post in the 'desktop environments' sub forum?

Why not just carry on using Gnome 2? See the first link in my signature (http://dl.dropbox.com/u/8403291/centos.html) for CentOS running Gnome 2 with updates until 2020. Currently running Firefox 10, OpenOffice 3.2 (you can install libreoffice 3.5 apparently as a 'manual install'). I went for CentOS to learn a new repository system; Debian Squeeze also runs Gnome 2 in a solid kind of way. This is my 'fallback partition' on my desktop PC which currently has 12.04 testing installed as the main OS.

Alternatives could include XFCE (I'm typing this on my netbook that has an XFCE session as well as a Unity session and a Gnome Shell session) or you could try one of the *boxes (openbox or fluxbox), others here are more familiar with those DEs.

What are you actually looking for in a desktop?

pinguinhood
March 5th, 2012, 03:13 PM
9) Enlightenment (or e17)

GraeW
March 5th, 2012, 05:28 PM
I have played around with openbox, fluxbox, afterstep, windowmaker, and enlightenment, but I keep coming back to XFCE. I wasn't too fond of Unity when it first came out, and haven't really tried it much since; KDE is decent if you want a Windows-esque environment, but it hasn't been as friendly to me as XFCE.

Currently have Xubuntu 12.04b1 on my laptop, just got it installed last night, but it's running well enough for me so far.

squilookle
March 5th, 2012, 05:42 PM
What is it you don't like about Gnome-Shell, Unity and KDE? Is it something you can put your finger on? Is it lack of configuration (guessing not for KDE), performance, the fact that they aren't Gnome 2, or a vague feeling?

Personally, I really like both Gnome Shell and Unity, but I don't like KDE. I loved KDE 3.x, I have given KDE4 several chances and really wanted to like it, but just couldn't, so I completely understand if it is something you can't identify. However, if you can identify why you don't like them, it will make it much easier to identify a replacement.

I haven't looked into it seriously myself (because I'm happy with the new DE's), so I'm not sure how useful this will be to you, but you might want to look into something like MATE - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MATE_(desktop_environment). My understand is that it is not finished but packages are available.

Version Dependency
March 5th, 2012, 05:45 PM
The Gnome Classic session in 12.04 is pretty nice and gives you a Gnome2-like experience. I think you might like it. Or for something new try Compiz Standalone (http://www.webupd8.org/2012/02/how-to-create-standalone-compiz-session.html) or Cairo Dock (which automatically adds a compiz/cairo dock session when you install).

trivialpackets
March 5th, 2012, 06:12 PM
I think I tried out using CentOS, but was having some problems getting it working with my wireless card. I can't recall the exact issue now, but I believe it had something to do with a module that wasn't compiled into the kernel that it was using. While I didn't have access to ethernet at the time to try to resolve the issue.

As far as what I'm looking for in an OS for my desktop is something that is relatively lightweight with normal desktop conveniences(auto-mounting of drives comes to mind), but what really matters is that it is responsive over NX as I do a fair bit of development over NX. Alternatively, the fastest way to work remotely would be really what matters. From what I've tried, NX is the best, and the older gnome2 DE seemed more responsive than current options that I've tried.


Hello eric.proctor and all

Certainly is a recurring discussion, and perhaps there ought to be a sticky post in the 'desktop environments' sub forum?

Why not just carry on using Gnome 2? See the first link in my signature (http://dl.dropbox.com/u/8403291/centos.html) for CentOS running Gnome 2 with updates until 2020. Currently running Firefox 10, OpenOffice 3.2 (you can install libreoffice 3.5 apparently as a 'manual install'). I went for CentOS to learn a new repository system; Debian Squeeze also runs Gnome 2 in a solid kind of way. This is my 'fallback partition' on my desktop PC which currently has 12.04 testing installed as the main OS.

Alternatives could include XFCE (I'm typing this on my netbook that has an XFCE session as well as a Unity session and a Gnome Shell session) or you could try one of the *boxes (openbox or fluxbox), others here are more familiar with those DEs.

What are you actually looking for in a desktop?

samalex
March 5th, 2012, 07:58 PM
When 12.04 LTS comes out I'll probably install it on my laptop which is at 10.04 LTS... but given I don't care much for what I've seen in Unity unless it knocks my socks off I'll probably move to XFCE or Fluxbox. Both are VERY slim and fast WM's and highly customizable.

Also check this site - http://xwinman.org/ - if you haven't seen it yet. It lists about every *nix desktop environment and windows manager out there. I'm not sure how well it's updated since most of the screenshots are from 2005 or prior, but it's still a great site.

dagroves
March 5th, 2012, 08:19 PM
I have used most of the other ones, Openbox, Fluxbox, KDE, Unity, Gnome 3, Gnome-Fallback, XFCE, and others. My favorite is XFCE, not on Xubuntu though, they botched XFCE very bad. But XFCE is a little to intense for my old (and I mean old) PC. I use Lubuntu and it runs like I just bought the thing! Check it out!

sffvba[e0rt
March 5th, 2012, 08:21 PM
Thread moved to Recurring Discussions.


404

trivialpackets
March 5th, 2012, 08:52 PM
It's about time. :)


Thread moved to Recurring Discussions.


404

trivialpackets
March 5th, 2012, 08:55 PM
That's too bad about xubuntu. I've read some pretty good reviews of the latest xubuntu. I just in fact downloaded it and burned it to CD for later tonight. Do you have some other options you'd recommend as far as distributions or XFCE in general?

As for Lubuntu, I run that on an ANCIENT little laptop that I have, although I only use it for connecting to the internet once in a while, but mostly for connecting to my development server via NX.


I have used most of the other ones, Openbox, Fluxbox, KDE, Unity, Gnome 3, Gnome-Fallback, XFCE, and others. My favorite is XFCE, not on Xubuntu though, they botched XFCE very bad. But XFCE is a little to intense for my old (and I mean old) PC. I use Lubuntu and it runs like I just bought the thing! Check it out!

TeamRocket1233c
March 7th, 2012, 09:22 PM
Hello eric.proctor and all

Certainly is a recurring discussion, and perhaps there ought to be a sticky post in the 'desktop environments' sub forum?

Why not just carry on using Gnome 2? See the first link in my signature (http://dl.dropbox.com/u/8403291/centos.html) for CentOS running Gnome 2 with updates until 2020. Currently running Firefox 10, OpenOffice 3.2 (you can install libreoffice 3.5 apparently as a 'manual install'). I went for CentOS to learn a new repository system; Debian Squeeze also runs Gnome 2 in a solid kind of way. This is my 'fallback partition' on my desktop PC which currently has 12.04 testing installed as the main OS.

Alternatives could include XFCE (I'm typing this on my netbook that has an XFCE session as well as a Unity session and a Gnome Shell session) or you could try one of the *boxes (openbox or fluxbox), others here are more familiar with those DEs.

What are you actually looking for in a desktop?

There's also GNOME Shell's Fallback mode to take advantage of.

Hendronicus
March 8th, 2012, 05:30 AM
@eric.proctor I've been trying out the new Xubuntu and I like it better than any other one I've seen. It's much lighter now, and quite hackable. I got compiz running without too much trouble and the layout isn't too bad. You should give it a try, really.
As a side note, I have an old computer; AMD Athlon 3200 cpu, 2 gigs of ram, Nvidia 6200 agp video card, VIA motherboard, and a SoundBlaster 16 pci sound card. I use a D-Link usb wireless stick to access the Internet. Everything worked without any hassle, and it's not slow. For the past two months, I've been trying what seems like every Linux distro in existence, and I've decided to stay with this Xubuntu. It's got everything I want. I can even share my wireless connection out through my built-in ethernet port with my second (even older) computer, using NetworkManager. I'm pretty happy.

3rdalbum
March 8th, 2012, 07:04 AM
You say "the new Gnome Fallback", but it's not new at all. It's available in 11.10 (sudo apt-get install gnome-session-fallback) so you can use it right away.

Personally, I like Unity and I think if development can speed up a bit after 12.04 it'll be unbeatable. Maybe you should try Unity in 12.04 for a few weeks, making use of as many of its features as you can, and you might never want to switch away?

click4851
March 8th, 2012, 07:17 AM
+1 Mint Cinnamon

markbl
March 8th, 2012, 10:40 AM
Personally, I really like both Gnome Shell and Unity, but I don't like KDE. I loved KDE 3.x, ..
This is also my same story. I switched to gnome for the first time when KDE 4 came out but I eventually came to love gnome's simplicity and clean function. That is also true of gnome-shell, it adopts the modern desktop metaphors, but retains simplicity and form.

I personally think that most people would actually like Unity and gnome-shell if they spend more time with them and thought more objectively. You need to change the way you do things, e.g. the way you switch between tasks/windows but you will eventually see that the new way(s) are better because they use screen space better and exploit modern graphics hardware to scale windows for switching/overview. I have just bought a Mac and am surprised at how similar Mac OS X is to features of both Unity and gnome-shell. All these modern desktops are converging on the same features so that must say something?

TBeholder
March 8th, 2012, 01:29 PM
I have just bought a Mac and am surprised at how similar Mac OS X is to features of both Unity and gnome-shell. All these modern desktops are converging on the same features so that must say something? It's more like "Mac fanboys, Mac fanboys everywhere!" - especially since Unity piled up features that don't even make sense together (http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1745415&page=2#15).

This is also my same story. I switched to gnome for the first time when KDE 4 came out but I eventually came to love gnome's simplicity and clean function. I'd still use Gnome sesion as something lightweight-yet-useful, just rarely want to save every single dust speck of CPU power.
As it is, Xubuntu works for me. I still have that Compiz Fusion button, but don't use it anymore.
Starting with bad news: Task Manager and File Manager got weak functionality, and unlike with gksudo you need to type password every time. It's not too bad in that Thunar can be replaced with Nautilus and taskmanager have "execute" with history. May as well sudo only once, then launch terminal, synaptic, gufw or editor (for configs) from taskmanager as the need arises.
The lower panel: when it's visible and there's something with its own toolbars, takes a little too much place even on a big screen, when invisible, usually block everything else autohiding because it's wider. But when it's moved to a side, made even wider, most elements other than window buttons stuffed there, one of panels (on wide monitors it may be side) is auto-hiding, another left with clock, some monitors, keyboard switcher and workspace switcher? Perfect.
So, good news is that Xfce allows to use custom menu separately (without linking into the main one), got very convenient quicklaunchers and droplist-capable launchers, and Clipman (one click to clipboard history droplist). And Generic Monitor can do just about anything non-interactive on a separate timer (e.g. show grep-cleaned 3x ping to a host, updated each 10 min).

Copper Bezel
March 8th, 2012, 06:00 PM
You say "the new Gnome Fallback", but it's not new at all. It's available in 11.10 (sudo apt-get install gnome-session-fallback) so you can use it right away.
I think that's supposed to be taken as "the new version of Gnome Fallback." Supposedly, from what I've seen said about it, it's supposed to be much more featureful. I don't really understand the difference, but apparently people using it say that it's usable now in a way that it wasn't before.

jrm7262
April 26th, 2012, 06:22 PM
Hi All,

You seem to know about windows managers here, so I hope this is the right place for this question.

I've just installed Ubuntu 12.04 on a Macbook Air, all's working well but I would like to try "flwm" (I'm just a minimalist at heart).

Created the ~/.xsession file with:

#!/bin/sh
xsetroot -solid \#006060
xrdb .Xresources
# xset, xmodmap, other configuration programs
flwm &
WindowManager=$!
# xterm, other automatically-launched programs
wait $WindowManager


as per the manual, but with no luck.

Any ideas how to get flwm working?


Kindest regards
James