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View Full Version : Using an older Ubuntu distro (10.04)



rmcellig
December 24th, 2011, 08:09 PM
I have tried and still continue to try out various distros put there but I always seem to come back to Ubintu 10.04. I like the look and feel, does everything I need it to, and is reliable. Is there a "real" problem using it once the LTS expires?

I noticed that Ultimate Edition 2.6 I think is based on 10.04. would that be the same as ubuntu 10.04 or has it been modified without sacrificing the stability of the original. Just curious.

3Miro
December 24th, 2011, 08:13 PM
After a distro has expired, you lose the ability to get security updates and install new software. I wouldn't use an expired distro.

You can try Debian 6, it is harder to install then Ubuntu 10.04, but it is more or less the same thing with longer support.

Penguinnerd
December 24th, 2011, 08:17 PM
Using any release after security updates have ceased is a bad idea.

However, there's still more than a year left for 10.04. And by the time support ends, 12.04 will have been out for a whole year already.

I expect things will be better in 12.04 than in the last few non-LTS releases, so I'm not worried. Things settle down when an LTS release happens.

I don't really know much about Ultimate Edition, but it seems likely that they won't provide support that lasts any longer than the regular Ubuntu.

And if you don't like Ubuntu 12.04, you'll still be able to get 5 full years of support with Xubuntu 12.04, which is starting to look like the best substitute.

kaldor
December 25th, 2011, 04:15 AM
Regarding distrohopping...

You'll enjoy the benefits of Linux much more if you choose distro that really are different and not just repackages or remakes of current distros. You'll find that the distros based on Ubuntu are just Ubuntu with different defaults or extra repos (etc). My recommendation is to just try entirely different distros; this way you'll learn more, discover more, and likely find new things to enjoy.

That said, Ubuntu 10.04 is a great release. It'll be supported until 2013 on the desktop, so that is awesome. I'm currently using it on my laptop (with PPAs) to keep stuff up to date (browsers, etc).

Merry xmas, btw. The WINE's just taking effect. <3

rmcellig
December 25th, 2011, 05:02 AM
Anks kaldor! Merry christmas to you and your family. You mention trying out totally different distros. Recommendations?

I am currently trying out puppy Linux which I like but find it rather hard to try and figure out how to do basic things that make mote sense in something like Ubuntu.

It just hues to show the diversity of Linux. What a trip. I hardly use my iMac anymore. I just want a distro that is simple, flexible and extensible. My current distro is ultimate edition 3 which is based on ubuntu 11.04.

kaldor
December 25th, 2011, 05:19 AM
Anks kaldor! Merry christmas to you and your family. You mention trying out totally different distros. Recommendations?

I am currently trying out puppy Linux which I like but find it rather hard to try and figure out how to do basic things that make mote sense in something like Ubuntu.

It just hues to show the diversity of Linux. What a trip. I hardly use my iMac anymore. I just want a distro that is simple, flexible and extensible. My current distro is ultimate edition 3 which is based on ubuntu 11.04.

Without knowing about your prior Linux knowlege, I'd recommend trying some of the traditional Linux distros: Fedora, OpenSUSE, Mandriva, etc. If you want a bit of a challenge, give something like Arch or Slackware a try. You'll learn a bit more about the internals of a Linux distro in doing so. But yeah, there's not much point in trying distros like UE, Mint, Debian, etc if you're already quite familiar with Ubuntu and looking for something new.

If you want simple, just stick with a common distro like Ubuntu. Fedora is also a nice fit, though it has less repos available than Ubuntu. As far as Linux distros go, Ubuntu and Fedora are definitely my favourites. You could also try out some of the BSDs, but that's a unique experience in itself.

Then again, OS X has some nice stuff as well. It's a certified UNIX OS, so you can treat it in the same way as you do with Linux. Try out some of the BSD Ports-like projects available (Mac ports, fink, etc) and you might be able to have fun with the Mac OS as well :)

rmcellig
December 25th, 2011, 11:32 AM
My Linux knowledge is at beginner status. I have been using Apple products since 1988. It's just over the past few months that I have been really getting into Linux. I'm not very impressed with the latest version of Ubuntu. I want to easily change settings without having a phd if you know what I mean. I always found gnome 2 to be pretty straight forward. This is what I look for in a distro.

The main thing I do on computer is extract snippets from videos as well as record and edit my radio shows. I use arecord to record the shows from a radio attached to my iMac. Audacity is my software of choice for editing.

At the moment I am using computers that were given to me by my co workers at the radio station. If I could install Linux on my iMac I would use that as my main os instead of osx lion. Two things prevent me from doing this. I can't seem to get the built in video cam to work and also I am unable to record from my attached radio. Works using the mac os but not with linux. Too bad :(

cloyd
December 25th, 2011, 02:35 PM
I have a netbook that has been great on everything up to and including 10.04 . . . but it won't run regular Ubuntu past 10.04. I have determined t hat it will run on Lubuntu. When 10.04 runs out . . . I'm sure it will be Lubuntu.