PDA

View Full Version : They dont support Linux



Robert1305
December 5th, 2011, 12:26 PM
I recently migrated to BT, I had a problem connecting to broadband (BT lost the order) When I contacted BT the chappie said don't worry I will provide you with free wi-fi until we can connect you in approx 7 days

What version of Windows are you using, was his next question, dont use windows, I use Linux, I said.

Oh! BT don't support Linux, he said and hung up. I felt like a leper, think I will buy a bell, ring BT and when they answere ring the bell and shout, UNCLEAN, UNCLEAN

Result I was without B/B for 5days. WHY don't BT support Linux.

nothingspecial
December 5th, 2011, 12:28 PM
Moved to the Cafe.

szymon_g
December 5th, 2011, 12:37 PM
hm...
i used to have BT as my ISP- no problems, there were no problems with connecting myself to internet (via router; wi-fi and cable).
what exactly you had your problem with?
web-based configuration can be easily accessed by typing routers IP in browser /i.e. you don't need a seperate windows-only application for that/

Bachstelze
December 5th, 2011, 12:39 PM
hm...
i used to have BT as my ISP- no problems, there were no problems with connecting myself to internet (via router; wi-fi and cable).
what exactly you had your problem with?
web-based configuration can be easily accessed by typing routers IP in browser /i.e. you don't need a seperate windows-only application for that/

Protip: actually read the message, the answer is in there.

aeiah
December 5th, 2011, 01:13 PM
the 'free wifi' they are providing, i assume, will just be BT Openzone or BT Fon or whatever it is. You should be able to connect to someone elses BT Openzone using your BT username/password.

they'll provide you with software or instructions for connecting, and if its software it'll just be to automate the connection process. next time phone up and say you've got windows and then just use the connection information they give you to connect using any operating system.

Swagman
December 5th, 2011, 01:29 PM
Plenty of Linux users on BT's own forums, including me.

http://community.bt.com/t5/forums/searchpage/tab/message?filter=location&location=Board%3ABBinHome&q=linux

F.G.
December 5th, 2011, 01:29 PM
hmm, i'm using a BT connection right now, it often has serious connectivity problems, but this is the same with Windows. so, what difference does the operating system make?

muteXe
December 5th, 2011, 02:07 PM
Been using BT internet for nearly 2 years now. Works the same whether i'm on my windows box, ubuntu box, or slackware box.

Docaltmed
December 5th, 2011, 03:22 PM
Don't ever tell tech support that you are using Linux. ALWAYS say Windows, even if you aren't. If they say use IE, just use FF. You can tell them that you only use FF if you want.

agillator
December 5th, 2011, 03:32 PM
I believe the question was 'Why don't they support Linux?' They, along with almost everyone else in the world of ISPs is going to tell you that. I can only guess at the reasons, but here are my guesses (and these are only my opinions):
1. Since windows has the majority of the market it is easier (much) to simply ignore Linux.
2. For the most part you are dealing with people who know little or nothing about computers. All they know is how to read a script, and some I'm not even certain know how to do that. To write a script for Linux would be a little more difficult since there are so many possibilities and so many things a user can do, as opposed to Windows and Macs.
3. A Linux user tends to be more knowledgable (even if they don't realize it) and the discussion probably goes far beyond their 'technician's' knowledge very quickly. It costs money to hire people who actually know something, so those are limited in number and further up the chain.
4. Most don't have a real choice in ISPs so a Linux user can't say 'Fine, I'll go with someone who does.'

Those are my thoughts for what they may or may not be worth. Note to ISPs: if I am wrong, PROVE IT BY YOUR ACTIONS.

Roasted
December 5th, 2011, 04:48 PM
2. For the most part you are dealing with people who know little or nothing about computers. All they know is how to read a script, and some I'm not even certain know how to do that. To write a script for Linux would be a little more difficult since there are so many possibilities and so many things a user can do, as opposed to Windows and Macs.


This is all too true, and sadly they don't even know how to read a script. More times than once I've called in for xyz reasons and explained that I am familiar with the IT field so if they need me to renew the IP, just say so.

"Okay, Sir. I understand. Let's proceed."
"I as in Isaac"
"P as in Peter"
"C as in Cat"
(followed by O N F I G)

:mad::mad::mad::mad::mad::mad:

satanselbow
December 5th, 2011, 05:14 PM
I had reason to speak to VirginMedia recently and got an "Oh Cool!" when the question of software installation / OS arose... I think I must really have been speaking to the ghost in the machine though as they described their own connectivity checking app as "pretty feeble" ... gotta love 'em :popcorn:

kurt18947
December 5th, 2011, 05:35 PM
I believe the question was 'Why don't they support Linux?' They, along with almost everyone else in the world of ISPs is going to tell you that.
<snip>

That is my experience as well. When we had fiber installed the technician gave a similar answer, did not want to hear about Linux. Fortunately I had an XP install among the cobwebs and dust of a long unused partition. He plugged his USB drive in and was happy. As soon as he left, i changed the router settings to suit and have been happy since. I sort of understand companies' reluctance to support Linux. The first order of business would be to determine which window manager/desktop environment the caller has installed. Then determine if the caller has the requisite add-ons and correct package versions. All for a relative hand full of customers. I don't like it but for telephone support I can understand it. If I were on the other side of a transaction I might do the same thing.

The only thing that might work would be for the ISP to supply a LiveCD customized to set up a connection. But how to produce a CD that will work with the vast majority of wireless adapters someone like BT's customers may have? Now that I think about it, the ISP required a PC with a wired connection so I guess the myriad of WiFi adapters would be less of an issue for ISPs. Still, stuff like this is why I choose to keep a Windows install.

sanderella
December 5th, 2011, 05:59 PM
I have no problems with BT. Been with them several years.

stalkingwolf
December 5th, 2011, 07:52 PM
when we moved here about 2.5 years ago I had the tech tell me they had to have a windows system to set up our internet. I set up my machine and booted windows.

About a year later their gateway went out and i had to have them come back to replace it. It was the same tech that had done the install. After he was finished with his configuring and all, and was about to go out the door,
I said, " Oh by the way you just did your first install on a linux machine.
Guess it will work huh."