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Mezzoforte
October 28th, 2011, 11:32 AM
I'm interested in creating an website that lets users create discussions and write comments. It sounds pretty simple, and indeed the first step is pretty simple, but I hope to be able to build something reasonably sophisticated. (Requirements: Large number of registered users, possibility to express how individual posts are related to other posts and display posts depending on this.) I hope I'm not being too vague.

The question is, which technologies would I do well to use? I am a programming beginner - the only language I know reasonably well is Ada (i.e., I took a university course and did pretty well). I have learnt some of the basics of PHP and MySQL (HTML and CSS aren't a problem) because it seemed to me that the straight-forward way to make my website system was to create MySQL databases, access them with PHP and then manage the output with HTML and CSS. In order to make the website more interactive, it also seems it would need a fair share of JavaScript.

It seems, however, that this might not be the most straight-forward way. I realize it will take a lot of time, but I learn quickly and should be able to make it using these technologies. But maybe it would be more efficient to use some kind of web application framework? I've heard some talk about Ruby on Rails, for example. Would that be a better option, or does it come with any serious restrictions or problems?

I'm for the moment mostly interested in creating the system in a development environment, but hopefully down the road it will lead to something that can be launched publicly.

moldaviax
October 28th, 2011, 12:12 PM
isn't there off the shelf software you could use for this? or is it more an exercise in programming?

M.

CptPicard
October 28th, 2011, 12:33 PM
Rails or Django depending on your language preference.

ofnuts
October 28th, 2011, 01:07 PM
I'm interested in creating an website that lets users create discussions and write comments. It sounds pretty simple, and indeed the first step is pretty simple, but I hope to be able to build something reasonably sophisticated..Re-inventing PhpBB or myBB?

AlexDudko
October 28th, 2011, 01:11 PM
Stay with PHP+MySQL+JavaScript+HTML+CSS

Mezzoforte
October 29th, 2011, 06:57 PM
ofnuts: Fair question, but I'm not aiming to make something like that. I want to move away from thread-based, chronological discussions. I haven't tried implementing any of those myself, but I think threads and chronological discussions are the foundation of them. Please correct me if I'm mistaken.

Mezzoforte
October 29th, 2011, 06:59 PM
Stay with PHP+MySQL+JavaScript+HTML+CSS

It seems this option would work fine, although I have to put in quite a lot of work until I have something that works.

What are the main differences between using, say, Rails and the combination mentioned (PHP+MySQL+JavaScript+HTML+CSS)? Any particular advantages/drawbacks?

juancarlospaco
October 29th, 2011, 08:50 PM
Python, Bottle, HTLM5, CSS3, JS, Ninja-IDE, WebP, SVG, WebM, JQuery,
you got Free hosting to start at https://appengine.google.com,
or Pay a hosting service of your choice, thats it, good luck dude!

gsmanners
October 29th, 2011, 09:19 PM
So, you're trying to create a wiki? It's awfully hard to find a concept in web coding that hasn't been pretty thoroughly done already.

Mezzoforte
October 29th, 2011, 10:40 PM
So, you're trying to create a wiki? It's awfully hard to find a concept in web coding that hasn't been pretty thoroughly done already.

Nope, no wiki. Wikis are good for trying to represent facts, but they're not as good for discussions that don't relate closely to facts. It's awfully hard to find an existing concept in web coding that hasn't been done well already, but there are probably innumerable new concepts that might find their place on the web (or replace old concepts).

maclenin
October 30th, 2011, 12:20 AM
My knee-jerk is: http://wordpress.org/

Some Penguin
October 31st, 2011, 09:06 AM
It seems this option would work fine, although I have to put in quite a lot of work until I have something that works.

What are the main differences between using, say, Rails and the combination mentioned (PHP+MySQL+JavaScript+HTML+CSS)? Any particular advantages/drawbacks?

All of those are tried-and-true, and have substantial amounts of relevant code already written as well as large pools of expertise from which to draw.

kevinharper
October 31st, 2011, 03:37 PM
My knee-jerk is: http://wordpress.org/

I'm w/ Maclenin on this...

Is this something that you need up and running or are you developing this for the experience? Either way you should look at WP. You can either install it, config, and let the community grow on its own... or you can use WP as a guide/goal of what you should develop.

EDIT: PS: You will need to know HTML5 and PHP if you want to tweak it.

lykwydchykyn
October 31st, 2011, 03:59 PM
I'd stay away from frameworks, especially if you're just starting out, if speed matters, and if you feel you have an original idea and don't want to be pushed into conventional ways of doing things.

Mezzoforte
November 1st, 2011, 03:31 PM
Thanks for all replies.

It seems the way to go is MySQL, PHP, Javascript, HTML and CSS.

AlexDudko
November 1st, 2011, 04:35 PM
Thanks for all replies.

It seems the way to go is MySQL, PHP, Javascript, HTML and CSS.

If you don't have your own server and can't configure it to your needs this seems the only sane variant because you stay dependent on companies which suggest hosting. Apache + MySQL (PostgreSQL - rarely) + PHP is the most usual configuration for the majority of them.

Mezzoforte
November 1st, 2011, 10:27 PM
If you don't have your own server and can't configure it to your needs this seems the only sane variant because you stay dependent on companies which suggest hosting. Apache + MySQL (PostgreSQL - rarely) + PHP is the most usual configuration for the majority of them.

Well, actually I've set up my own local Apache and MySQL servers already, so that I'll be able to try out code without having to upload it all to a web host. There is a decent chance I'll want to get a real host later though - I probably should be a little more knowledgeable about security before starting to run a server of my own open to the public. I don't know, maybe it's not a big deal configuring everything to be secure, but I'll definitely read up on it first. And learn to write secure code.

Mezzoforte
November 1st, 2011, 10:34 PM
I'm w/ Maclenin on this...

Is this something that you need up and running or are you developing this for the experience? Either way you should look at WP. You can either install it, config, and let the community grow on its own... or you can use WP as a guide/goal of what you should develop.

EDIT: PS: You will need to know HTML5 and PHP if you want to tweak it.
Wordpress is good, and maybe it would save me more coding than it would cost changing it. However, Wordpress is a no-go to use for something with a commercial potential, and I'm not quite sure on that point yet.

gsmanners
November 1st, 2011, 11:27 PM
If we're talking about a project with commercial potential, then I don't see what's stopping you from just starting at the bare metal with C. Make sure it's all coded the way you want it and no silliness getting in the way of functionality.

Mezzoforte
November 2nd, 2011, 12:44 AM
If we're talking about a project with commercial potential, then I don't see what's stopping you from just starting at the bare metal with C. Make sure it's all coded the way you want it and no silliness getting in the way of functionality.

Unfortunately I don't know C yet. At all. (I only know Ada reasonably well.) I'm guessing it would take a while to learn C well enough to make good use of it. PHP and MySQL seem easy enough to use, and being a little short on time I think I'll go with those.

I like the idea though.

gsmanners
November 2nd, 2011, 12:52 AM
Yeah. C does have a bit of a learning curve. You'd want it least a month or two to spare.