PDA

View Full Version : Ubuntu 2nd OS?



Calerid
October 15th, 2011, 10:17 AM
Hello, all
what is the benefit of using Ubuntu as a second OS. Why do people choose to use Linux as another OS to take up HD space? If you don't want it as a primary why have it at all? Can anyone give any ideas? A short response is all I need, though I like reading the in depths ones to. I appreciate all of the comments!

Just a brief explanation of my use, I run Ubuntu 11.04 on both my systems. I run it on my main desktop. though it may be harder to customize, it still supports older hardware like mine. I like the fact I have to get closer to my OS to use and understand it. Some people don't understand because they are in the ease of use category of technology users. I like a challenge every time I turn on my computer. If I cannot modify, change, update, or make it my own way then it's not for me. I also LOVE the community that comes pre-installed :P thats you guys!!!

Captain Smiley Pants
October 15th, 2011, 10:20 AM
Because they can.

Rubykuby
October 15th, 2011, 10:41 AM
Because people use different OSes for different purposes. A gamer might boot Windows only when gaming, and use Ubuntu for everything else. A web designer might use Ubuntu for everything, but Windows to test Safari(?) and Internet Explorer.

Owenoen
October 15th, 2011, 10:52 AM
Hello, all
what is the benefit of using Ubuntu as a second OS. Why do people choose to use Linux as another OS to take up HD space? If you don't want it as a primary why have it at all? Can anyone give any ideas?
Well, I used a Windows Dreamapark Windows Server 2008 R2 copy version as my primary OS to use PS and Office, and some other softwares which are chosen to be our school's default teaching softwares.
Using Ubuntu as the second OS, because It's free and is widely supported now. I can get o different experience by installing and using Linux.
By the way, it's beautiful.

Calerid
October 16th, 2011, 10:11 PM
Well, thank you for the bottom two responses. That is more what I was looking for. As for the first not really helpful, it was more of a psychological and logical question. I wanted to know what exactly it was that drives some people to take the time to install to foreign to one another OS's.

ibutho
October 16th, 2011, 10:28 PM
Well, thank you for the bottom two responses. That is more what I was looking for. As for the first not really helpful, it was more of a psychological and logical question. I wanted to know what exactly it was that drives some people to take the time to install to foreign to one another OS's.

If you look at at it from another perspective, the first response makes sense and was helpful. There are many people who do things simply because they can. It may not fit in with the type of response you were looking for, but there are some people like that.

Leaf
October 16th, 2011, 10:36 PM
I actually have 3 different OS installed on my primary drive. Old winxp, win7, and Ubuntu.

I spend 90% of the time in ubuntu but sometimes that windows gaming itch demands to be scratched! It's so simple to have multiple OS, I wonder why you wouldnt have it.

Of course, if disk space is an issue, I can see your concern.

aura7
October 16th, 2011, 10:37 PM
Another aspect is in case one OS crashes you can still work and recover your data.

Leaf
October 16th, 2011, 10:45 PM
Its always a really good idea to have your data (music, pics, personal info, etc.) on a separate physical HD!

Who knows when you'll type the dreaded rm -ref *.* in a caffeine laden haze...
I used to laugh, then I did it by accident. Shame

(it deletes every file. Dont do this!!!!!)

Calerid
October 16th, 2011, 11:06 PM
If you look at at it from another perspective, the first response makes sense and was helpful. There are many people who do things simply because they can. It may not fit in with the type of response you were looking for, but there are some people like that.

I did indeed ask for a logical response in the beginning though. That said, I did define my question and my wanted responses. Because I can does not define the logical course of thought behind it.

Wampyra
October 16th, 2011, 11:13 PM
Hello, all
what is the benefit of using Ubuntu as a second OS. Why do people choose to use Linux as another OS to take up HD space? If you don't want it as a primary why have it at all? Can anyone give any ideas?

I HAVE TO HAVE WINDOWS as I like developing stuff in Flash... Also Photoshop...
Simple...

Ubuntu is on my laptop. Serves me ok to relax with a clean OS while coding web pages..

Change is good ;)

Wampyra
October 16th, 2011, 11:18 PM
Another aspect is in case one OS crashes you can still work and recover your data.
LiveCD or Hirensboot or similar could do the trick too...

Unless...


Who knows when you'll type the dreaded rm -ref *.* in a caffeine laden haze...


:lolflag:]

...oh boy... u used to laugh too (*,)

PaulInBHC
October 16th, 2011, 11:35 PM
I like the hobby aspect of open source. I like ubuntu and the community. I doubt I will purchase another Windows OS. The games that I play don't work in wine. If they ever do, or I get to the point where I don't play them anymore, I will probably ditch windows.

Wild Man
October 16th, 2011, 11:56 PM
Hi, I do it for several reasons.

1. It is more secure and I do not have to worry about viruses.

2. I like being able to customize as much or as little as I want.

3. I do not like being told that I can only install a program that I paid a lot of money for a certain amount of times on the same computer.

4. It is much more stable, I rarely have a problem and if I do it almost never results in a reinstall.
Thank you

Wampyra
October 17th, 2011, 03:16 PM
I rarely have a problem and if I do it almost never results in a reinstall.
Thank you

Master!
I wish i could say the same.. But i hope i will one day. After I level up in terminal :D

grahammechanical
October 17th, 2011, 03:50 PM
When you purchased your computer did the seller give you a choice of operating system? No! I had to build a machine to run the one OS that I use. I did not want to pay for an OS (Windows) that I did not want you use.

How many of us would use two OS if we could buy the latest machines with Ubuntu pre-installed?

On my machine I have Ubuntu 11.04, 11.10 and Ubuntu Studio 11.10. I use the ability of Ubuntu to set dual-booting systems to test different versions of Ubuntu.

I do this because I can with Ubuntu. But as a home user I have no need for the Windows OS.

Regards.

varunendra
October 17th, 2011, 05:29 PM
. After I level up in terminal
That itself is one of the many possible reasons. You can not learn any OS in one day. So while you take your time to learn/try the other OS to see if it suits you better, you will need your first one too to get your work done, at least until you learn how to do it on the other one and start liking that way.

oldos2er
October 17th, 2011, 05:48 PM
Not a support request; moved to Community Cafe.

Legendary_Bibo
October 17th, 2011, 06:35 PM
Ubuntu saved my *** one semester in college (Vista killed itself on a service pack update) by giving me something I could do school papers with (which I'm supposed to be writing one up now), and at the time I thought it was okay (gnome 2 in Ubuntu 9.10 was kind of ugly) and I always thought Ubuntu/Linux had potential as a desktop OS.

I'm not even someone who can't stand change, I mean I'm using Gnome Shell, and find it a great upgrade from Gnome2. I don't even have a desire to do theme hopping anymore because for once Gnome's default look looks good.

I still think Unity sucks.

stinkeye
October 17th, 2011, 06:57 PM
I think for a lot of us it started out as pure curiosity and being able to dual boot you say "Well it's free lets have a look."
Then as you learn more about linux and the computing world as a whole
it soon becomes your 1st OS or only OS.

Mark Phelps
October 17th, 2011, 09:43 PM
Well ... I did it years ago purely out of curiosity. Saw a lot of "press" about Ubuntu and decided to try it (since it was FREE) and see what it could do.

Also, once I got into it, I discovered a lot of freedom regarding applications as well. There were always 2-3 apps for doing anything and, again, since they were FREE, didn't have to spend any money to try them out.

Then recently, discovered that when I needed to make some changes to system files in Windows, I could not get by the Windows permission problems -- even logged in as the "hidden" Administrator.

Simply mounted the Windows OS partition, made the changes using Gedit, saved the files. When I booted back into Windows, I had all the changes maded that I had needed -- without having to deal with permissions problems.

Brian0312
October 17th, 2011, 10:13 PM
For me, I'm starting to realize it's probably more of a transition phase than anything else. I decided to dual boot at first for two main reasons. The first is that I'm not the only user of the laptop and my loved ones are, lets say "resistant" to change, especially with computers because of the usual "I don't know computers" phobia that turns brains off. So I wanted windows as a fallback option to alay fears. The second is that when you start researching Linux, you find everyone talking about the bugs they encountered. Hell even this forum is 99% horror stories of the times it doesn't work. So I had an understandable fear of it being a total mess and wanted an easy way to escape.

The thing is, I have been running Ubuntu for about 8 months now, and in that time, I haven't actually needed windows at all, and I've booted it exactly once at the request of my wife. So most likely, I'll be transferring the music over to the EXT4 partition and wiping Vista out existence for the extra space in the near future. Probably shortly after I explain to the family how much money the won't have to spend on upgrading to Windows 7 or 8.

smellyman
October 17th, 2011, 11:57 PM
2 reasons....

the wife

and

stream torrents.

3Miro
October 18th, 2011, 12:09 AM
Not second, Linux is my first OS. Here are some reasons:

Work:
http://www.top500.org/project/introduction

Freedom:
http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/free-sw.html

There is also the whole Unix speed, stability and security, but this kind of ties to the work point.

And the few games that I play, also happen to work well under wine. So I use Linux for games too, there is no need for Windows.

Old_Grey_Wolf
October 18th, 2011, 12:46 AM
I did indeed ask for a logical response in the beginning though. That said, I did define my question and my wanted responses. Because I can does not define the logical course of thought behind it.

You didn't mention logic in the initial post. People are not machines, and aren't always logical. They have emotional preferences regarding how their computer will operate for various uses or various pleasures; such as, writing programs or gaming. Thus some people use multiple operating systems to satisfy those needs, wants, or requirements. The requirements may force them to use multiple operating systems.

Calerid
October 18th, 2011, 01:06 AM
For me, I'm starting to realize it's probably more of a transition phase than anything else. I decided to dual boot at first for two main reasons. The first is that I'm not the only user of the laptop and my loved ones are, lets say "resistant" to change, especially with computers because of the usual "I don't know computers" phobia that turns brains off. So I wanted windows as a fallback option to alay fears. The second is that when you start researching Linux, you find everyone talking about the bugs they encountered. Hell even this forum is 99% horror stories of the times it doesn't work. So I had an understandable fear of it being a total mess and wanted an easy way to escape.

The thing is, I have been running Ubuntu for about 8 months now, and in that time, I haven't actually needed windows at all, and I've booted it exactly once at the request of my wife. So most likely, I'll be transferring the music over to the EXT4 partition and wiping Vista out existence for the extra space in the near future. Probably shortly after I explain to the family how much money the won't have to spend on upgrading to Windows 7 or 8.

I like this one, I find similar issues in my own experiences. Same when I started jailbreaking, tweaking, modding... Everyone is afraid once the OS's on a device crashes it's gone forever!!!

Calerid
October 18th, 2011, 01:10 AM
You didn't mention logic in the initial post. People are not machines, and aren't always logical. They have emotional preferences regarding how their computer will operate for various uses or various pleasures; such as, writing programs or gaming. Thus some people use multiple operating systems to satisfy those needs, wants, or requirements. The requirements may force them to use multiple operating systems.

All of the reasons you supplied right there answer the original question. It's the reasons behind "because they can" that I am asking for. So far I have seen some really nice responses that I like, and may relate to.

Frogs Hair
October 18th, 2011, 01:34 AM
Due to employer restrictions I have never been able to use my own software or computer and Linux is included .

Since Windows is the the norm for work and school , it is nice use and learn about and use something else .

I use Ubuntu for pleasure and I sill need Windows for school so I dual boot . I also dabble with games and having Windows makes that easier when my father offers me the latest game to try .

Old_Grey_Wolf
October 18th, 2011, 01:39 AM
All of the reasons you supplied right there answer the original question. It's the reasons behind "because they can" that I am asking for. So far I have seen some really nice responses that I like, and may relate to.

I have set up a private cloud using Ubuntu Enterprise Cloud (UEC) "because I could". It was not because I needed a private cloud; however, it was for learning something new. Learning something new just for the fun of it (a very emotional motive). A year later that knowledge kept me employed. Logically, I didn't decide to learn about UEC for a carrier move; however, that random experiment into something new payed off.

Calerid
October 18th, 2011, 01:44 AM
I have set up a private cloud using Ubuntu Enterprise Cloud (UEC) "because I could". It was not because I needed a private cloud; however, it was for learning something new. A year later that knowledge kept me employed. Logically, I didn't decide to learn about UEC for a carrier move; however, that random experiment into something new payed off.

You did it again, you provided reasoning for it. You were interested in something new. Like me, I like learning random things. I'm 17 and I download random case studies to understand something new! I did not say I needed an in depth reason for it, just some reasoning as to why.

earthpigg
October 18th, 2011, 02:41 AM
Was a transitional phase for me.

Anger at pre-sp1 Vista on my then-new laptop.

Realized that trying Ubuntu would cost me (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opportunity_cost) nothing, and might be fun.

Tried out Ubuntu. Liked it better.

Kept Vista for many months "just in case".

"Just in case" never happened. Ditched Windows.

cariboo907
October 18th, 2011, 04:15 AM
Hello, all
what is the benefit of using Ubuntu as a second OS. Why do people choose to use Linux as another OS to take up HD space? If you don't want it as a primary why have it at all? Can anyone give any ideas?

I feel that way about Windows, on most of my systems there isn't any windows install at all. I use Linux, remember Ubuntu isn't the only Linux distribution available, because it gives me the freedom to do what I want with my system the way I want. If I want a command line only system, it takes a lot less time to setup, than a typical Windows installation. If I want all kinds of eye candy, that up until recently wasn't available in a Windows install I can do that too.

The only reason I have any Windows installations at all is I fix Windows problems for a living.

wolfen69
October 18th, 2011, 04:24 AM
The only reason I have any Windows installations at all is I fix Windows problems for a living.

Same here. I don't have much choice, as I need to know windows and keep up with it. If it wasn't for that, I would probably ditch it.