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forrestcupp
October 8th, 2011, 02:46 AM
In England, what we call "French fries" in America, you call "chips".

In America, what we call "chips" are thin, deep fried, crispy things, usually made out of potatoes or corn, and they come in bags in the grocery store. My son wants to know what you call those in England, since over there "chips" are French fries.

ilovelinux33467
October 8th, 2011, 02:54 AM
I think they are called "crisps" in the UK.

wolfen69
October 8th, 2011, 02:56 AM
Crisps?

lisati
October 8th, 2011, 03:07 AM
I think they are called "crisps" in the UK.

That's what I've heard too. They're all "chips" to me...... :D

BrokenKingpin
October 8th, 2011, 03:08 AM
I think they are called "crisps" in the UK.
This is correct.

Henry Flower
October 8th, 2011, 03:09 AM
The ones made of sliced potato are indeed crisps; the ones made of corn don't really have a name. On the pack they're described as 'corn snacks' or some such; informally you'd probably call them by a brand name (usually Quavers).

ninjaaron
October 8th, 2011, 05:38 AM
The ones made of sliced potato are indeed crisps; the ones made of corn don't really have a name. On the pack they're described as 'corn snacks' or some such; informally you'd probably call them by a brand name (usually Quavers).

You've got Doritos, right?

Elfy
October 8th, 2011, 05:44 AM
In England, what we call "French fries" in America, you call "chips".

In America, what we call "chips" are thin, deep fried, crispy things, usually made out of potatoes or corn, and they come in bags in the grocery store. My son wants to know what you call those in England, since over there "chips" are French fries.I'd call the really thin chips french fries - real chips should be thick :)


You've got Doritos, right?
yep


The ones made of sliced potato are indeed crisps; the ones made of corn don't really have a name. On the pack they're described as 'corn snacks' or some such; informally you'd probably call them by a brand name (usually Quavers).Are not those things made of maize?

prettysum
October 8th, 2011, 07:31 AM
Is it just me? this conversation just made me hungry.

:popcorn:

JDShu
October 8th, 2011, 07:35 AM
My high school teacher from Liverpool had an epic debate with the students about fries vs chips and chips vs crisps.

mendhak
October 8th, 2011, 07:40 AM
If you go to a McDonald's in the UK, the french fries are called french fries rather than chips. Chips are generally 'thick' fries. But can be thin.



Also, there is something called wedges (http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/1294/images/1294_MEDIUM.jpg). They're thick potato slices but without the fried skin on the outside. What are these called in the US?

JDShu
October 8th, 2011, 07:46 AM
Also, there is something called wedges (http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/1294/images/1294_MEDIUM.jpg). They're thick potato slices but without the fried skin on the outside. What are these called in the US?

Same thing, potato wedges.

Elfy
October 8th, 2011, 07:54 AM
My high school teacher from Liverpool had an epic debate with the students about fries vs chips and chips vs crisps.

I bet beef dripping made an appearance in that one then :)

JDShu
October 8th, 2011, 07:59 AM
I bet beef dripping made an appearance in that one then :)

I actually wasn't paying much attention, she suddenly questioned me about whether it was chips or fries, I said chips (as I think fish and chips were on the menu that day, even though I actually call them fries) and I was called a "good man".

Cheering for Man U was strictly forbidden though.

Elfy
October 8th, 2011, 08:00 AM
...Cheering for Man U was strictly forbidden though.
I should hope so :p

mips
October 8th, 2011, 09:40 AM
My son wants to know what you call those in England, since over there "chips" are French fries.

They are generally referred to as crisps in the UK.

In South Africa we call french fries/fries/crisps/chips/maize snacks all chips.

Hell, now I'm in the mood for slap chips...

haqking
October 8th, 2011, 09:57 AM
american chips = crisps

american fries = chips

american biscuits = scones

american ice cream sandwich = choc ice

american beef pattie = burger

american sausage link = sausage

american cookies = biscuits

american soda = fizzy (pop)

american gas station = garage or petrol station

american french toast = eggy bread -we have ketchup not cinnamon ;-)

american hershey chocolate = cardboard ;-)

Elfy
October 8th, 2011, 10:22 AM
american chips = crisps

american fries = chips

american biscuits = scones

american ice cream sandwich = choc ice

american beef pattie = burger

american sausage link = sausage

american cookies = biscuits

american soda = pop

american gas station = garage or petrol station

american french toast = gypsy toast -we have ketchup not cinnamon ;-)

american hershey chocolate = cardboard ;-)

:)

IIRC there's a pop/soda thread in here somewhere

haqking
October 8th, 2011, 10:26 AM
:)

IIRC there's a pop/soda thread in here somewhere

ha no doubt.

I love it over there (lived there for a few years) every bottle of pop is just soda, and there is a soda machine everywhere, we say just fancy a coke, pepsi, fanta they just say i want a soda...LOL

oh how i miss Mountain Dew (best caffeinne filled refreshing addiction there is ;-)

oh and eggy bread/gypsy toast is also called "poor knights of windsor" if you have jam on it (thats what my grandad used to call it..lol

TeoBigusGeekus
October 8th, 2011, 10:28 AM
:lolflag:

haqking
October 8th, 2011, 10:29 AM
:lolflag:

rooty tooty point and shooty....LOL

mips
October 8th, 2011, 11:43 AM
american biscuits = scones

That stuff americans call biscuits are revolting and nothing like proper english scones. Proper scones with jam & cream or cheese are divine.

coffeecat
October 8th, 2011, 12:05 PM
Proper scones with jam & cream or cheese are divine.

It has to be the "proper" cream too...

West Country clotted cream (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clotted_cream).

Oo-aarrr! Packed with good west country cholesterol! :)

matt_symes
October 8th, 2011, 12:18 PM
Oo-aarrr! Packed with good west country cholesterol! :)

now i can't read and i can't write but that don't really matter, cause i be from the west country and i can drive a tractor.

Being from the west country myself, i can testify to the greatness of west country clotted cream.

Oo-aarrr! Now where's me pinta cider ?

Elfy
October 8th, 2011, 12:30 PM
Oo-aarrr! Now where's me pinta cider ?

In here. (http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1855853)

The Cog
October 8th, 2011, 12:51 PM
american ice cream sandwich = choc ice

That's a new one on me. If an American had mentioned an ice cream sandwich to me, I would have been wondering if the bread was buttered or not.

Also,
American : British
jelly : jam or marmalade
jello : jelly

I still have a liking for peanut butter and marmalade (US:jelly) sandwiches after being introduced to them by an American kid.

nothingspecial
October 8th, 2011, 01:07 PM
I am currently tucking into that great British delicacy, the fishfinger buttie.

What do they call that in the USA?

mgmiller
October 8th, 2011, 01:28 PM
I am currently tucking into that great British delicacy, the fishfinger buttie.

What do they call that in the USA?

I just looked up some google images of your delicacy. It looks like a fried fish sandwich to me. We usually have them here with larger pieces of fish, rather then the "fish sticks" I saw in the pictures, but it seems to be substantially the same thing. I had one the other day for lunch. Had lettuce and tomato on it. I don't like tartar sauce (is that the same thing you call it) which is usually served on it here, so I have that left off. "Hold the tartar sauce".

nothingspecial
October 8th, 2011, 01:34 PM
I just looked up some google images of your delicacy. It looks like a fried fish sandwich to me. We usually have them here with larger pieces of fish, rather then the "fish sticks" I saw in the pictures, but it seems to be substantially the same thing. I had one the other day for lunch. Had lettuce and tomato on it. I don't like tartar sauce (is that the same thing you call it) which is usually served on it here, so I have that left off. "Hold the tartar sauce".

Not tartar sauce. The correct sauce for a fishfinger buttie is tomato ketchup. :)

coffeecat
October 8th, 2011, 01:40 PM
The correct sauce for a fishfinger buttie is tomato ketchup. :)

I thought you used tomato ketchup for a chip buttie. :p Don't ask me about chip butties. I'm a southerner. :?

nothingspecial
October 8th, 2011, 01:42 PM
Tomato or Brown sauce for a chip buttie.

But mayonnaise for a crisp buttie.

mgmiller
October 8th, 2011, 01:53 PM
Not tartar sauce. The correct sauce for a fishfinger buttie is tomato ketchup. :)

Lots of folks over here also like to use tomato ketchup on this kind of sandwich as well. As I don't particularly care for the taste of ketchup, I don't use it on anything. I do love tomatoes in all other ways though.

With most things fish/seafood, I tend to be a purist. I don't add anything that masks the flavor of the fish, which I really enjoy. So, no lemon added to lobster or shrimp scampi. mmm...shriiiimp!

Any of you ever had a soft shelled crab sandwich? We take a blue claw crab right after it molts its shell and before the new one has a chance to harden. It's then batter dipped and fried and put on a bun. The legs stick out the sides and it looks like something from the movie Alien, but its really good.

haqking
October 8th, 2011, 02:07 PM
That stuff americans call biscuits are revolting and nothing like proper english scones. Proper scones with jam & cream or cheese are divine.

i know they are disgusting, served with gravy (not what i call gravy) but the closest i could think of is scones, but you cant beat a nice a fresh scone with jam


It has to be the "proper" cream too...



West Country clotted cream (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clotted_cream).

Oo-aarrr! Packed with good west country cholesterol! :)

I hate cream


Not tartar sauce. The correct sauce for a fishfinger buttie is tomato ketchup. :)

tartar sauce for scampi though, though you cant get that in the USA either


Tomato or Brown sauce for a chip buttie.

But mayonnaise for a crisp buttie.

+1 but only hellmans ;-)

thatguruguy
October 8th, 2011, 02:16 PM
I don't use tomato catsup/ketchup. Not ever.

The proper way to have french fries/pomme frites/chips is to have them pan-fried, tossed with sea salt and garlic and a squirt of lemon juice, and served up with some creme fraiche for dipping. SRSLY. You'll thank me.

Drizzled with a bit of duck fat is pretty good, too.

haqking
October 8th, 2011, 02:19 PM
I don't use tomato catsup/ketchup. Not ever.

The proper way to have french fries/pomme frites/chips is to have them pan-fried, tossed with sea salt and garlic and a squirt of lemon juice, and served up with some creme fraiche for dipping. SRSLY. You'll thank me.

Drizzled with a bit of duck fat is pretty good, too.

Heinz Ketchup or HP Brown Sauce !

De facto ;-)

actually or a good curry sauce from the right chip shop...lol

haqking
October 8th, 2011, 02:22 PM
I just looked up some google images of your delicacy. It looks like a fried fish sandwich to me. We usually have them here with larger pieces of fish, rather then the "fish sticks" I saw in the pictures, but it seems to be substantially the same thing. I had one the other day for lunch. Had lettuce and tomato on it. I don't like tartar sauce (is that the same thing you call it) which is usually served on it here, so I have that left off. "Hold the tartar sauce".

Fish Fingers are known as Fish sticks in the USA, same thing yeah

But please dont say you get them from Long John Silvers....YUCK lol

LinuxFan999
October 8th, 2011, 02:32 PM
Long john silvers is gross. Don't go there, ever.

drofart
October 8th, 2011, 03:05 PM
Is it just me? this conversation just made me hungry.

:popcorn:
nop me too:popcorn:;)
But not for chips/crips,, actually some thing else ,, Hmmm tasty ,isn't it?

Dy1anW
October 8th, 2011, 03:24 PM
American "French fries" = British chips;
thinner ones are called shoe-strings;
chips with skins on are generally referred to as "German style";
wedges are literal wedges.

American gas station = British petrol station, but a gas station is quite literally just that: LPG station (usually attached to a petrol station, but sometimes they're separate).

...and HP sauce on bacon and tomato butties. :)

mr-woof
October 8th, 2011, 03:53 PM
I might go the chippy now after reading this, buttered chip barm :)

haqking
October 8th, 2011, 03:58 PM
I might go the chippy now after reading this, buttered chip barm :)

Chip barm and a bag of scraps covered in salt and vinegar.....yuymmy scrummy in my tummy

mr-woof
October 8th, 2011, 04:01 PM
High five :)

haqking
October 8th, 2011, 04:15 PM
High five :)

oooh i forgot with a cold can of dandelion and burdock ;-)

lisati
October 8th, 2011, 04:26 PM
Vinegar on fries/chips/crisps? Yuck! Gross! Although not "correct", tomato sauce is much better.

haqking
October 8th, 2011, 04:28 PM
Vinegar on fries/chips/crisps? Yuck! Gross! Although not "correct", tomato sauce is much better.

well malt vinegar yes, and not just on...but soaked in ;-) with lots of salt too, nice chunky sea salt, served in newspaper so the paper soaks and splits and you get print all over your hands...awesomeness for a walk along the seasside ! ahhh im happy to be back in the UK now ;-)

mips
October 8th, 2011, 04:37 PM
I might go the chippy now after reading this, buttered chip barm :)

I'm busy cooking fish & slap chips (with salt & vinegar + tomato sauce) as I type this. The slap chips will go on a roll, my mouth is watering!

iiiears
October 8th, 2011, 05:02 PM
If i set Firefox preferences to UK English will i need a translator?
Not adventurous enough to try South African English yet. but i afrikaans change my mind. /silly

Cheers! erm, Good Day, Have a Nice day,
oh you know what i mean.
Thank You for an entertaining thread.

thatguruguy
October 8th, 2011, 05:36 PM
Ok, srsly.

mips
October 8th, 2011, 05:42 PM
If i set Firefox preferences to UK English will i need a translator?
Not adventurous enough to try South African English yet. but i afrikaans change my mind. /silly


UK English is used across most of the world. In SA we use UK/Oxford/Queens english but we have some local words unique to SA (due to cultural influences from african/malay/indian/portugese/french languages) just like there would be some unique words in NZ, Oz etc etc.

ninjaaron
October 8th, 2011, 05:49 PM
american biscuits = scones


The rest seem alright, but I'm not sure about this one. We have scones, but they are usually sweet with stuff like fruit or cinnamon or chocolate. Biscuts usually have a lighter texture and a bit saltier of a flavor, and you spread stuff on them (well, you spread stuff on scones too, but not always).

At least stateside, the two are really similar, but they are definitely two different things. Then again, I've never had anything like an American biscut anywhere but America.

haqking
October 8th, 2011, 05:51 PM
The rest seem alright, but I'm not sure about this one. We have scones, but they are usually sweet with stuff like fruit or cinnamon or chocolate. Biscuts usually have a lighter texture and a bit saltier of a flavor, and you spread stuff on them (well, you spread stuff on scones too, but not always).

At least stateside, the two are really similar, but they are definitely two different things. Then again, I've never had anything like an American biscut anywhere but America.

I know see my post #33

thatguruguy
October 8th, 2011, 05:56 PM
Then again, I've never had anything like an American biscut anywhere but America.

That's because the rest of the world hates our freedom! Or our biscuits. Or something.

Anyway, back to french fries.

oldos2er
October 8th, 2011, 06:45 PM
american chips = crisps

american fries = chips

american biscuits = scones

american ice cream sandwich = choc ice

american beef pattie = burger

american sausage link = sausage

american cookies = biscuits

american soda = fizzy (pop)

american gas station = garage or petrol station

american french toast = eggy bread -we have ketchup not cinnamon ;-)

american hershey chocolate = cardboard ;-)

Ok, so what the hell is a crumpet? And do you serve your scones with sausage gravy? :D

haqking
October 8th, 2011, 06:48 PM
Ok, so what the hell is a crumpet? And do you serve your scones with sausage gravy? :D

ha ha crumpets are awesome...not sure how to desribe them though, please no one come on and say it like a muffin cos its not !

marmite or peanut butter melted on a hot crumpet....delicious.

and our scones are not like yours really, it was just the closest thing i could think of, ours are sweeter and served with clotted cream and jam usually.

as for sausage gravy, i am pretty sure if i responded to that i would get an infraction...LOL i cant stand the stuff !

nothingspecial
October 8th, 2011, 06:50 PM
These are crumpets



203815

yum, yum

Elfy
October 8th, 2011, 06:52 PM
not too yum yum - no strawberry jam ...

haqking
October 8th, 2011, 06:52 PM
These are crumpets



203815

yum, yum

you had to do it didnt ya, luckily i live 30 seconds walk from both a chip shop and a spar shop.....mmmm chips or crumpets !

mmm crumpets and marmite i think ;-)

The Cog
October 8th, 2011, 06:53 PM
Yum yum indeed - with loads of melted butter. It soaks into the holes.

But with marmite or peanut butter? Ugh, that's disgusting.

Elfy
October 8th, 2011, 06:54 PM
And do you serve your scones with sausage gravy? :D

Some might - odd choice :)

http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/1729/images/1729_MEDIUM.jpg

nothingspecial
October 8th, 2011, 06:55 PM
marmite is one of the most finest, delicious tastes there is.

But I prefer it on toast, or with pasta.

Lots of butter on a crumpet for me.

mips
October 8th, 2011, 07:03 PM
Ok, so what the hell is a crumpet?


ha ha crumpets are awesome...not sure how to desribe them though, please no one come on and say it like a muffin cos its not !

I think it's a 'bit' like an american pancake. I like crumpets with butter & honey.

Then again our local pancakes are nothing like american pancakes, they're French crÍpes.

mips
October 8th, 2011, 07:06 PM
marmite is one of the most finest, delicious tastes there is.

Been in love with Marmite most of my life but lately I prefer Bovril.

mips
October 8th, 2011, 07:07 PM
http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/1729/images/1729_MEDIUM.jpg

Absolute torture!!!

I could eat six of those right now and wash it down with a cup of tea.

haqking
October 8th, 2011, 07:09 PM
Yum yum indeed - with loads of melted butter. It soaks into the holes.

But with marmite or peanut butter? Ugh, that's disgusting.

it is deeeeeeeelicious !


Been in love with Marmite most of my life but lately I prefer Bovril.


love marmite, i love cups of it, hot marmite like a cup of hot bovril.

also great in a bolognese for extra flavour.

darn shop had no crumpets ! gutted !

mips
October 8th, 2011, 07:14 PM
darn shop had no crumpets ! gutted !

lol, i've never seen crumpets in a shop, we make them from scratch. Do they sell premade ones over there?

haqking
October 8th, 2011, 07:17 PM
lol, i've never seen crumpets in a shop, we make them from scratch. Do they sell premade ones over there?

yeah they surely do, and now i am sulking...i asked the floor manager if they had any, to which he replied "no sorry sold out, we only get a couple of packs in but they go real quick as they are popular" LOL....i had no response, i am guessing they havent figured out supply and demand concepts yet

Elfy
October 8th, 2011, 07:33 PM
Absolute torture!!!

I could eat six of those right now and wash it down with a cup of tea.

sorry :(

:)

I've got to unsubscribe - too much talk of peanut butter making me feel queasy ...

oldos2er
October 8th, 2011, 10:04 PM
These are crumpets



203815

yum, yum

So, a muffin? It's all so confusing. lol

Funnily enough, over here those are called English muffins.

haqking
October 8th, 2011, 10:08 PM
So, a muffin? It's all so confusing. lol

Funnily enough, over here those are called English muffins.

see my first sentence in post #54

THEY ARE NOT MUFFINS.......LOL

you can buy crumpets in US i cant remember where i got them from now though, but they are not ENGLISH MUFFINS ;-)

I refer you to http://www.anenglishmaninamerica.co.uk/where-to-buy-english-crumpets-in-america.php

muffins are crumpets ? i dont know, my granny would turn in her grave...LOL

MG&TL
October 8th, 2011, 10:19 PM
what I would call a muffin: (But NOT an english muffin)

http://www.google.com/imgres?q=muffin+pic&um=1&hl=en&client=ubuntu&sa=N&channel=fs&gl=uk&biw=1366&bih=680&tbm=isch&tbnid=kLNed80L2rvYdM:&imgrefurl=http://www.muffinrecipes.net/&docid=UUHCAtFl-xi4PM&w=300&h=434&ei=jb6QTrKcAY6s8QP4j4E2&zoom=1&iact=rc&dur=364&page=1&tbnh=159&tbnw=115&start=0&ndsp=18&ved=1t:429,r:0,s:0&tx=55&ty=50

What do Americans call haggis?

Do Americans have accents? If you go to Scotland, it's considerably different to, say London. But I can't say I've ever noticed much difference in American accents.

coffeecat
October 8th, 2011, 10:20 PM
So, a muffin? It's all so confusing. lol

Funnily enough, over here those are called English muffins.

English muffin:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_muffin

English crumpet:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crumpet#English_crumpet

Those are not very good pictures. Although they are both toasted, buttered and eaten as a snack with various toppings, the texture and taste is quite different. :)

haqking
October 8th, 2011, 10:26 PM
what I would call a muffin: (But NOT an english muffin)

http://www.google.com/imgres?q=muffin+pic&um=1&hl=en&client=ubuntu&sa=N&channel=fs&gl=uk&biw=1366&bih=680&tbm=isch&tbnid=kLNed80L2rvYdM:&imgrefurl=http://www.muffinrecipes.net/&docid=UUHCAtFl-xi4PM&w=300&h=434&ei=jb6QTrKcAY6s8QP4j4E2&zoom=1&iact=rc&dur=364&page=1&tbnh=159&tbnw=115&start=0&ndsp=18&ved=1t:429,r:0,s:0&tx=55&ty=50

What do Americans call haggis?

Do Americans have accents? If you go to Scotland, it's considerably different to, say London. But I can't say I've ever noticed much difference in American accents.

A NY/NJ accent is different to a kentucky accent, to a georgia accent to a Boston accent etc

There are a whole lot of different accents there for sure.

MG&TL
October 8th, 2011, 10:29 PM
I'll take your word for it. :)

haqking
October 8th, 2011, 10:31 PM
I'll take your word for it. :)

Mainly Irish though...LOL

lisati
October 8th, 2011, 11:57 PM
These are crumpets



203815

yum, yum
Good to see that this meaning was presented......

I think it's a 'bit' like an american pancake. I like crumpets with butter & honey.

Then again our local pancakes are nothing like american pancakes, they're French crÍpes.
Samoan pancakes are something different again, a bit like deep-fried balls of dough or banana cake mix.

ninjaaron
October 9th, 2011, 12:41 AM
What do Americans call haggis?We don't have it, so we call it haggis.


Do Americans have accents? If you go to Scotland, it's considerably different to, say London. But I can't say I've ever noticed much difference in American accents.

We most certainly have accents, but they are usually more regional. You won't notice much difference between two towns right next to each other, except sometimes on the east coast. There are also regional accents among minority communities which are not the same as the general accent in the region, which I find fascinating, but everyone else seems to take for granted. I guess it makes sense, but it doesn't make it less interesting.

People in broadcasting try to cultivate a mid-western accent, and sometimes educated people in other regions try to pick it up as well (not sure why. Must be a sociological thing). I was given this accent at birth, so I don't have much to complain about, I guess. That's the accent you normally hear when you watch American television or movies.

Pujims
October 9th, 2011, 01:01 AM
american soda = fizzy (pop)
;-)


Actually in Michigan we call it pop they would ask you where you're from if you said soda

http://twentytwowords.com/2010/09/10/map-of-the-u-s-showing-what-people-call-sodapopcoke/

interesting map of what pop is called in the US

smellyman
October 9th, 2011, 01:21 AM
Everything "proper" is from England. India has worse curry than a proper "English curry".

haha

forrestcupp
October 9th, 2011, 01:24 AM
Thanks for a great response, everyone. I told my son that I thought chips are called crisps over there, and it looks like I was right.

The reason biscuits > scones: Because biscuits are excellent with either butter and jam or sausage gravy. I'll bet scones wouldn't be good with gravy. ;) Biscuits are also good smothered with beef stew.

You British people don't seem to like peanut butter a lot. Do you eat Nutella there?


Do Americans have accents? If you go to Scotland, it's considerably different to, say London. But I can't say I've ever noticed much difference in American accents.I'm sure we have many, many more accents in the US than you do in the UK. You guys just make a bigger deal about it because you're all closer together. But if you're basing your experience of American accents by what you see on TV and the movies, then you're not going to get a lot of variety. They're trained to speak without an accent.


We most certainly have accents, but they are usually more regional. You won't notice much difference between two towns right next to each other, except sometimes on the east coast.That's not really true. I live in a small, rural city in east central Indiana, and the people in Indianapolis think we have a country accent. People in Gary, Indiana probably have a slightly different accent than people from Indianapolis. There are countless variations of accents across the entire US. It's just that we don't pay attention to the distinction as much as they do in the UK.

fatality_uk
October 9th, 2011, 01:58 AM
Re muffins (muffin tops)
http://pauloflaherty.com/2011/03/25/muffin-top/

VanR
October 9th, 2011, 03:29 AM
That stuff americans call biscuits are revolting .

Well now you've just gone too far. This certainly means you've never eaten a good ole Southern buttermilk biscuit smothered in white sausage gravy. Best stuff on earth.

mips
October 9th, 2011, 07:53 AM
So, a muffin? It's all so confusing. lol

Funnily enough, over here those are called English muffins.

Nope.

Blueberry muffins:
http://healthywaists.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/blueberry-muffins.jpg

The Cog
October 9th, 2011, 10:37 AM
You British people don't seem to like peanut butter a lot. That's not right. Peanut butter is quite popular although there are those who don't like it of course. The main complaint is that it's a bit dry. I correct that by adding a layer of marmalade on top, but people tend to look at me as though I'm mad whan I say that.

I really don't think peanut butter belongs on crumpets though - it would be like putting tomato ketchup on your ice cream.
Do you eat Nutella there?I've seen it on the shelves but I'm not sure if it's like the peanut butter I'm used to - SunPat or Tesco own brand.

mips
October 9th, 2011, 11:44 AM
I've seen it on the shelves but I'm not sure if it's like the peanut butter I'm used to - SunPat or Tesco own brand.

Nutella is nothing like peanut butter, it's a chocolate spread and not nearly as dry or thick as peanut butter. Not that fond of it though.

mips
October 9th, 2011, 11:45 AM
Well now you've just gone too far. This certainly means you've never eaten a good ole Southern buttermilk biscuit smothered in white sausage gravy. Best stuff on earth.

You are probably right, only had the fast food varieties.

haqking
October 9th, 2011, 11:48 AM
Nope.

Blueberry muffins:
http://healthywaists.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/blueberry-muffins.jpg

They are muffins yes, and you can get them everywhere in the US, but not english muffins.

English muffins are used for breakfast and are what are used in McDonalds for an egg mc muffinn

Still not a crumpet ;-)

MG&TL
October 9th, 2011, 11:51 AM
Do you lot over the pond have marmalade?

http://www.google.com/imgres?q=marmalade&um=1&hl=en&client=ubuntu&sa=N&channel=fs&gl=uk&biw=1366&bih=680&tbm=isch&tbnid=q3J3PHjPf6baJM:&imgrefurl=http://gardeningregisterblog.co.uk/index.php/calamondine-marmalade/&docid=q-53vSsoO2HNGM&w=300&h=274&ei=tHyRTq6RCs278gPv6JgT&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=941&vpy=331&dur=455&hovh=215&hovw=235&tx=182&ty=121&page=1&tbnh=139&tbnw=152&start=0&ndsp=23&ved=1t:429,r:13,s:0

haqking
October 9th, 2011, 11:58 AM
Do you lot over the pond have marmalade?

http://www.google.com/imgres?q=marmalade&um=1&hl=en&client=ubuntu&sa=N&channel=fs&gl=uk&biw=1366&bih=680&tbm=isch&tbnid=q3J3PHjPf6baJM:&imgrefurl=http://gardeningregisterblog.co.uk/index.php/calamondine-marmalade/&docid=q-53vSsoO2HNGM&w=300&h=274&ei=tHyRTq6RCs278gPv6JgT&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=941&vpy=331&dur=455&hovh=215&hovw=235&tx=182&ty=121&page=1&tbnh=139&tbnw=152&start=0&ndsp=23&ved=1t:429,r:13,s:0

I love marmalade, nice and chunky with big bits of orange peel in it, on doorstep crusty bread toast !

YES ;-)

MG&TL
October 9th, 2011, 12:01 PM
Strawberry jam with whole strawberries in. Ahhhh....

haqking
October 9th, 2011, 12:03 PM
Strawberry jam with whole strawberries in. Ahhhh....

raspberry jam with lots of little seeds...ahhh LOL

haqking
October 9th, 2011, 12:04 PM
raspberry jam with lots of little seeds...ahhh LOL

OOOOOH i forgot !


LEMON CURD !

MG&TL
October 9th, 2011, 12:13 PM
Mmm....lemon meringue pie.

http://www.google.com/imgres?q=lemon+meringue+pie&um=1&hl=en&client=ubuntu&sa=N&channel=fs&gl=uk&biw=1366&bih=680&tbm=isch&tbnid=Jd2rIxh2rts5UM:&imgrefurl=http://lilbitof.blogspot.com/2011/02/lemon-meringue-pie-recipe.html&docid=BVa4TFvCF3nwoM&w=320&h=400&ei=04GRTr_CDMHE8QOzusg3&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=1128&vpy=163&dur=1530&hovh=251&hovw=201&tx=128&ty=128&page=1&tbnh=147&tbnw=126&start=0&ndsp=21&ved=1t:429,r:6,s:0

MG&TL
October 9th, 2011, 12:15 PM
I can pretty much guarantee that you won't have this, Americans, or at least you won't call it this:

Eton Mess.:

http://www.google.com/imgres?q=eton+mess&um=1&hl=en&client=ubuntu&sa=N&channel=fs&gl=uk&biw=1366&bih=680&tbm=isch&tbnid=3F2xseOMUrHd0M:&imgrefurl=http://solidrecipe.com/make-strawberry-yogurt-eton-mess/strawberry-and-yogurt-eton-mess-photos-1/&docid=i9oKeIGGFBwVOM&w=240&h=240&ei=LYKRTuatPJS58gOUjbE9&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=791&vpy=374&dur=1689&hovh=192&hovw=192&tx=87&ty=184&page=2&tbnh=140&tbnw=140&start=18&ndsp=18&ved=1t:429,r:15,s:18

MG&TL
October 9th, 2011, 12:16 PM
I am surprised-we've left out the third major dialect of English-Australian.

Any Aussies like to enlighten us on what you call this stuff.?

ninjaaron
October 9th, 2011, 01:08 PM
Nutella is nothing like peanut butter, it's a chocolate spread and not nearly as dry or thick as peanut butter. Not that fond of it though.

Nuttella is also full of hazelnuts, which makes it disgusting. There are some other chocolate spreads that skip the hazelnut, and taste much better, in my opinion. They are probably also less healthy. I don't really use any of it in any event.

BTW, I'm an American who likes Marmite/Veggimite (Yeast curd, I guess it's called, properly), but I've been around the block a few times, so I also like weird stuff like Nordic salt-licorice.

haqking
October 9th, 2011, 01:12 PM
Nuttella is also full of hazelnuts, which makes it disgusting. There are some other chocolate spreads that skip the hazelnut, and taste much better, in my opinion. They are probably also less healthy. I don't really use any of it in any event.

BTW, I'm an American who likes Marmite/Veggimite (Yeast curd, I guess it's called, properly), but I've been around the block a few times, so I also like weird stuff like Nordic salt-licorice.

I hope you dont mean that vegemite and marmite are the same thing ?

That is like the whole crumpet and english muffin thing...LOL

MG&TL
October 9th, 2011, 02:24 PM
What's vegemite?

haqking
October 9th, 2011, 02:29 PM
What's vegemite?

it is a yeast extract from australia, which the people without a palette confuse with marmite ;-)

http://britishfood.about.com/od/diningdrinkingtradition/a/marmitevvegemite.htm

kurt18947
October 9th, 2011, 03:05 PM
ha no doubt.

I love it over there (lived there for a few years) every bottle of pop is just soda, and there is a soda machine everywhere, we say just fancy a coke, pepsi, fanta they just say i want a soda...LOL

oh how i miss Mountain Dew (best caffeinne filled refreshing addiction there is ;-)

oh and eggy bread/gypsy toast is also called "poor knights of windsor" if you have jam on it (thats what my grandad used to call it..lol

The carbonated beverage terminology isn't just UK vs US. In the American midwest and I think the Pacific Northwest, carbonated beverages are called "Pop". The American east coast calls it "soda". In parts of the South it's a "coke" no matter if the label says Pepsi, Dr. Pepper or whatever :).

ice60
October 9th, 2011, 03:20 PM
in england we (but, not me) like to eat faggots :D
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/******_%28food%29

you'll have to find the link yourself it's been censored

Merk42
October 9th, 2011, 03:22 PM
I can pretty much guarantee that you won't have this, Americans, or at least you won't call it this:

Eton Mess.:

http://www.google.com/imgres?q=eton+mess&um=1&hl=en&client=ubuntu&sa=N&channel=fs&gl=uk&biw=1366&bih=680&tbm=isch&tbnid=3F2xseOMUrHd0M:&imgrefurl=http://solidrecipe.com/make-strawberry-yogurt-eton-mess/strawberry-and-yogurt-eton-mess-photos-1/&docid=i9oKeIGGFBwVOM&w=240&h=240&ei=LYKRTuatPJS58gOUjbE9&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=791&vpy=374&dur=1689&hovh=192&hovw=192&tx=87&ty=184&page=2&tbnh=140&tbnw=140&start=18&ndsp=18&ved=1t:429,r:15,s:18
If that's just a mixture of fruit and yogurt we do have it, but it's called a (fruit and yogurt) parfait.

Elfy
October 9th, 2011, 03:24 PM
No yogurt - meringue, cream and strawberries:)

Quite sweet - especially if you're like me and put some extra sugar in the cream because meringue just never has enough :)

haqking
October 9th, 2011, 03:30 PM
in england we (but, not me) like to eat faggots :D
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/******_%28food%29

you'll have to find the link yourself it's been censored

I love faggots, funnily enough i had them a couple of days ago.

lashings of thick gravy, mashed potatoes and MUSHY peas...OMG how can a Ubuntu Forum make me salivate !

and no before anyone asks they are not meatballs. The most popular brand is ironically Brains (as they look like brains) but the best is homemade from the local butcher

Merk42
October 9th, 2011, 06:17 PM
No yogurt - meringue, cream and strawberries:)

Quite sweet - especially if you're like me and put some extra sugar in the cream because meringue just never has enough :)
Those exist too, just 'fancier' than what I mentioned earlier.

haqking
October 9th, 2011, 06:20 PM
If that's just a mixture of fruit and yogurt we do have it, but it's called a (fruit and yogurt) parfait.

doesnt parfait have jello pieces in it ? or pieces of jelly as us brits would say ;-)

oh and another british thing, Milk Jelly...YUM

heat up some milk, pout it over the jelly (jello) like you would the hot water and stick it in the fridge to set.

Milk Jelly...scrummy with chocolate sauce

ninjaaron
October 9th, 2011, 07:10 PM
No yogurt - meringue, cream and strawberries:)

Quite sweet - especially if you're like me and put some extra sugar in the cream because meringue just never has enough :)

My mom calls it a Schaum Torte.

ninjaaron
October 9th, 2011, 07:13 PM
it is a yeast extract from australia, which the people without a palette confuse with marmite ;-)

http://britishfood.about.com/od/diningdrinkingtradition/a/marmitevvegemite.htm

I haven't had vegemite in a while, but I'll readily admit that my taste in yeast extract is rather undeveloped. It's not like you can get that stuff just anywhere.

forrestcupp
October 10th, 2011, 12:23 PM
That's not right. Peanut butter is quite popular although there are those who don't like it of course. The main complaint is that it's a bit dry. I correct that by adding a layer of marmalade on top, but people tend to look at me as though I'm mad whan I say that.I don't know why they look at you as though you're mad. In the US, it's very popular to have a peanut butter and jelly/jam sandwich. The only time I eat a peanut butter sandwich without jam is when I'm eating it with chili.


Nuttella is also full of hazelnuts, which makes it disgusting. There are some other chocolate spreads that skip the hazelnut, and taste much better, in my opinion. They are probably also less healthy. I don't really use any of it in any event.Nutella is actually hazelnut spread that has a hint of chocolate mixed in. It's completely different from peanut butter and chocolate spread.


doesnt parfait have jello pieces in it ? or pieces of jelly as us brits would say ;-)No. There are many different types of parfaits. A parfait is just a cold dessert made in layers, usually served in a cup. I've had fruit and yogurt parfaits, pudding parfaits with layers of whipped cream and cookie crumbs, and ice cream parfaits with layers of syrup, nuts, and whipped cream. Good stuff.

haqking
October 10th, 2011, 12:28 PM
I haven't had vegemite in a while, but I'll readily admit that my taste in yeast extract is rather undeveloped. It's not like you can get that stuff just anywhere.

Thankfully....LOL

mips
October 10th, 2011, 12:32 PM
I don't know why they look at you as though you're mad. In the US, it's very popular to have a peanut butter and jelly/jam sandwich. The only time I eat a peanut butter sandwich without jam is when I'm eating it with chili.

You must try peanut butter & marmite.

haqking
October 10th, 2011, 12:34 PM
You must try peanut butter & marmite.

I am a peanut butter and ketchup person myself, it started off as a kid as my sandwiches for school trips would dry out as i dont eat butter or margarine and so peanut butter when warm goes dry, as a kid i of course loved ketchup so added it and has stuck ever since.

A few of my PB & J friends from states thought it was gross until they tried it and now they love it...lol

forrestcupp
October 10th, 2011, 02:32 PM
You must try peanut butter & marmite.Marmite just sounds nasty. I don't think I'll be trying that.


I am a peanut butter and ketchup person myself, it started off as a kid as my sandwiches for school trips would dry out as i dont eat butter or margarine and so peanut butter when warm goes dry, as a kid i of course loved ketchup so added it and has stuck ever since.

I'm not a big ketchup person, but even if I were, that sounds very nasty. In the US, we're pretty much programmed to think of peanut butter as a sweet thing. The main ways we eat it is with jelly/jam or in candy, like Reese's Cups.

I also like peanut butter and banana sandwiches, dipping popcorn in peanut butter, and eating peanut butter with my pancakes and maple syrup.

haqking
October 10th, 2011, 02:34 PM
Marmite just sounds nasty. I don't think I'll be trying that.



I'm not a big ketchup person, but even if I were, that sounds very nasty. In the US, we're pretty much programmed to think of peanut butter as a sweet thing. The main ways we eat it is with jelly/jam or in candy, like Reese's Cups.

I also like peanut butter and banana sandwiches, dipping popcorn in peanut butter, and eating peanut butter with my pancakes and maple syrup.

yeah i hear ya, but peanut butter goes so well with many things, spread some on some chicken and stick it on the bbq, put a layer on a pork chop with some thin sliced apple on top and whack it under the grill....YUMMY

open a banana, spread some chunky peanut butter into it, add a squirt of honey or syrup, wrap it in foil and stick it on the bbq, then serve with ice cream.


OMG this thread is killing me...LOL

Elfy
October 10th, 2011, 02:55 PM
I'd take vegemite over peanut butter - though to be frank I can't abide either ...

Now marmite of course is fine :)

The Cog
October 10th, 2011, 07:13 PM
I also like peanut butter and banana sandwichesI'm going to have to try that one.

haqking
October 10th, 2011, 07:14 PM
I'm going to have to try that one.

add a little honey, it is awesome

fillmont
October 10th, 2011, 07:38 PM
I'm going to have to try that one.


Best food ever.

I like to use crunchy peanut butter, cause it adds some texture to the otherwise creamy peanut butter and the soft banana.

PhilGil
October 10th, 2011, 08:43 PM
Not a big fan of bananas, but peanut butter spread on sliced apple is delicious.

forrestcupp
October 10th, 2011, 08:44 PM
spread some on some chicken and stick it on the bbq

I've had peanut chicken at the Chinese restaurant. I can eat it, but it's not my favorite.

I love those homemade peanut butter cookies that have a Hershey's Kiss on top.

lisati
October 10th, 2011, 08:54 PM
You must try peanut butter & marmite.

That's weird. Vegemite and cheese (which I have tried) is better than the way that sounds. On its own I prefer marmite in sandwiches.

MG&TL
October 10th, 2011, 09:27 PM
Would I be the only one that doesn't like Marmite/Vegemite? <don't kill me!>

I tried cheese for the first time yesterday. It was disgusting. I don't see what the fuss is about. Anybody tell me? (although I daresay you will tell me anyways!)

haqking
October 10th, 2011, 09:29 PM
Would I be the only one that doesn't like Marmite/Vegemite? <don't kill me!>

I tried cheese for the first time yesterday. It was disgusting. I don't see what the fuss is about. Anybody tell me? (although I daresay you will tell me anyways!)

LOL nobody can tell you why you should like the taste of something, you either do or you dont !

your taste buds are your own.

personally i love cheese. I love marmite, i hate cream, i hate butter or margarine.

MG&TL
October 10th, 2011, 09:31 PM
.. i hate cream, i hate butter or margarine.

BUT-....no, I won't judge. ;) Your taste buds are your own. :D

Paqman
October 10th, 2011, 10:03 PM
I tried cheese for the first time yesterday.

*Brain explodes*

How is that even possible? Were you raised by wolves?

mips
October 11th, 2011, 09:18 AM
I tried cheese for the first time yesterday. It was disgusting. I don't see what the fuss is about.

Where you from that you've never had cheese before? I know dairy foods are not very big in asia. I love cheese!

forrestcupp
October 11th, 2011, 12:33 PM
I tried cheese for the first time yesterday. It was disgusting. I don't see what the fuss is about. Anybody tell me? (although I daresay you will tell me anyways!)
Another reason to promote The Cheese Super Thread (http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1608809)!

I couldn't live without cheese. I love it.

Pujims
October 11th, 2011, 03:14 PM
Originally Posted by MG&TL http://ubuntuforums.org/images/buttons/viewpost.gif (http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?p=11328855#post11328855)
I tried cheese for the first time yesterday. It was disgusting. I don't see what the fuss is about. Anybody tell me? (although I daresay you will tell me anyways!)


The whole state of Wisconsin weeps for you!

pathos_society
October 11th, 2011, 03:25 PM
I can indeed taste the difference between Vegemite and Marmite. Vegemite is thick, pasty, and delicious; while Marmite is runny, too salty, and generally awful.

Unfortunately, guess which one of the two is available in the US. :(

Elfy
October 11th, 2011, 03:39 PM
I hope Marmite - because you've got it wrong - it's vegemite which is generally awful :p

and peanut butter ...

haqking
October 11th, 2011, 03:53 PM
I can indeed taste the difference between Vegemite and Marmite. Vegemite is thick, pasty, and delicious; while Marmite is runny, too salty, and generally awful.

Unfortunately, guess which one of the two is available in the US. :(

both are available in the US, trader joes has marmite.

ikt
October 11th, 2011, 04:21 PM
personally i love cheese. I love marmite, i hate cream, i hate butter or margarine.

Just reminded me I need to buy some more cheesybite.

haqking
October 11th, 2011, 04:28 PM
Just reminded me I need to buy some more cheesybite.

primula squeezy cheese and chive with marmite on crackers

forrestcupp
October 11th, 2011, 05:02 PM
Do you have head cheese in the UK?


http://pennyscribbler.files.wordpress.com/2011/07/headcheese2.jpeg

mips
October 11th, 2011, 05:10 PM
I can indeed taste the difference between Vegemite and Marmite. Vegemite is thick, pasty, and delicious; while Marmite is runny, too salty, and generally awful.

Unfortunately, guess which one of the two is available in the US. :(

http://www.africanhut.com/jams-and-spreads.asp
Have both marmite & vegemite.

Something you americans (and other might enjoy):
http://www.africanhut.com/images/product/126l.jpg
http://www.africanhut.com/shopexd.asp?id=203

Lots of other goodies on that site like biltong & boerewors, http://www.africanhut.com/biltong-and-boerewors.asp

Elfy
October 11th, 2011, 05:26 PM
Do you have head cheese in the UK?


http://pennyscribbler.files.wordpress.com/2011/07/headcheese2.jpeg

yep - Brawn we call it

Edit - apparently in some parts it's called pork cheese

MG&TL
October 11th, 2011, 07:45 PM
Errr....what the **** is that? Tell me that's meat in the middle...:shock:

I don't know, whole family likes cheese apparently, just never got around to eating anything.

forrestcupp
October 11th, 2011, 07:52 PM
Errr....what the **** is that? Tell me that's meat in the middle...:shock:

I don't know, whole family likes cheese apparently, just never got around to eating anything.

I've heard they make it by boiling a hog's head and scraping the meat off of it. I'd rather try marmite than head cheese. ;)

MG&TL
October 11th, 2011, 07:56 PM
I've heard they make it by boiling a hog's head and scraping the meat off of it. I'd rather try marmite than head cheese. ;)

Yeah....I like hog roasts though....steamy pork. :D

Pujims
October 12th, 2011, 02:11 PM
How about s'mores? Do you have s'mores?

haqking
October 12th, 2011, 02:32 PM
How about s'mores? Do you have s'mores?

we do if we make them, same as you ;-)

Pujims
October 12th, 2011, 03:08 PM
Whew life would be sad without s'mores!

Paqman
October 12th, 2011, 03:30 PM
How about s'mores? Do you have s'mores?

Tbh, I had to Google that. So no, not really. I'm not even too sure what our analogue of a "graham cracker" would be.

haqking
October 12th, 2011, 03:31 PM
Tbh, I had to Google that. So no, not really. I'm not even too sure what our analogue of a "graham cracker" would be.

digestive biscuit is closest

and we do have them here, it is just something you make around the fire

Paqman
October 12th, 2011, 03:36 PM
digestive biscuit is closest

Ugh, so basically MDF in biscuit form?



and we do have them here, it is just something you make around the fire

Fair enough, maybe I've just been deprived. I've roasted a few marshmallows, but I've never dipped one in chocolate and stuck it in a cracker.

haqking
October 12th, 2011, 03:45 PM
Ugh, so basically MDF in biscuit form?



Fair enough, maybe I've just been deprived. I've roasted a few marshmallows, but I've never dipped one in chocolate and stuck it in a cracker.

ha well not so sure about using a cracker, but a digestive biscuit or graham cracker (not cracker like out crackers) is definately nice.

MDF that reminds me of the army ration pack biscuits A and B but you might not know what im on about there ;)

Paqman
October 12th, 2011, 03:58 PM
MDF that reminds me of the army ration pack biscuits A and B but you might not know what im on about there ;)

Well, I did my time in uniform elsewhere, but I suspect the ratpacks of the world are pretty similar...

haqking
October 12th, 2011, 04:19 PM
Well, I did my time in uniform elsewhere, but I suspect the ratpacks of the world are pretty similar...

yeah they are ;-) biscuits that taste like manhole covers, tea bags the size of beach towels and one sheet of toilet paper...LOL

mips
October 12th, 2011, 04:29 PM
How about s'mores? Do you have s'mores?

Had to google that, never had on but they kinda remind me of 'cutie pies'.

Paqman
October 12th, 2011, 05:56 PM
one sheet of toilet paper...

Did you get the comedy instructions about how to use that? Tear a wee hole in the middle, etc?

haqking
October 12th, 2011, 05:59 PM
Did you get the comedy instructions about how to use that? Tear a wee hole in the middle, etc?

oh yes of course, but i wasnt gonna mention that on here though i was tempted...LOL

MG&TL
October 12th, 2011, 06:09 PM
Did you get the comedy instructions about how to use that? Tear a wee hole in the middle, etc?

Do I want to know?

haqking
October 12th, 2011, 06:11 PM
Do I want to know?

not on this forum NO ;-) LOL

i will PM ya

dpny
October 12th, 2011, 06:38 PM
What do Americans call haggis?

Awful?


Do Americans have accents? If you go to Scotland, it's considerably different to, say London. But I can't say I've ever noticed much difference in American accents.

We do, but they're not as pronounced as UK accents. One of the fascinating things about US English is its relative uniformity in both grammar and pronunciation across a large geographic area. The best explanation I've seen for this is that the country was settled coincident with the invention of mass media, first in newspapers and books, and then with the telegraph. This enforced a uniformity of language lack in older places.

I was born in the south, currently live in NYC, and have lived in a few places around the country, so I can hear different accents. But they're nothing like the difference between London and Glasgow.

Swagman
October 12th, 2011, 06:57 PM
I am surprised-we've left out the third major dialect of English-Australian.

Any Aussies like to enlighten us on what you call this stuff.?


As an Ex-Perthian (Western Australian) and now a UK res.. Australia has a bit of a... (searches for right word) clash of standards... For want of a better word

eg: to an Aussie

Chips are chips or fries

Ask someone their height and they are likely to answer in Imperial (Feet & inches) but ask them their weight and it will definitely be in Metric (Kg)

an (electric) light bulb is a globe

Trousers are trousers/strides or Pants

Thongs are worn on your feet !!

"How yer going" is asking how you are not where your destination is.



Question for our American friends though is.. What do you call (Potato) scallops ?

Thick slice (full potato length) dipped in batter & fried



Weird Factoid


Ask for Fish & chips in a UK chippy and you'll be given Cod as the fish... Until you go north of Nottingham whereby Haddock becomes the default fish.

This causes me delays as I live in Peterborough (Midlands) and therefore I have to order Haddock on joining the queue and then wait 10 mins for it to be cooked whereas Cod is cooked and is in the "Keepa Warmerer".

Haddock being the VASTLY superior tasting fish. Cod has to be practically pickled with vinegar to give it any kind of acceptable taste ( It's a very bland taste)

The Sorrow
October 12th, 2011, 07:23 PM
Ive always enjoyed listening to Brits talk. Makes me like my English teachers a bit more :P

wolfen69
October 12th, 2011, 07:29 PM
Question for our American friends though is.. What do you call (Potato) scallops ?


Scalloped potatoes.

lisati
October 12th, 2011, 07:31 PM
In recent years I've noticed two distinct items of food known as "cheerios" on the supermarket. One's a breakfast cereal, the other resembles a small version of a saveloy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saveloy): I've only recently noticed the breakfast cereal version on the shelves.

wolfen69
October 12th, 2011, 07:38 PM
One of the fascinating things about US English is its relative uniformity in both grammar and pronunciation across a large geographic area. The best explanation I've seen for this is that the country was settled coincident with the invention of mass media, first in newspapers and books, and then with the telegraph. This enforced a uniformity of language lack in older places.


That's ridiculous. The only mass media up until the early 1900's was newspaper and telegraph. How exactly does the written word or dot,dot,dash influence whether an area has an accent or not? If anything, the english language should be more homogenized now than ever before, because we can interact more with people from different areas.

But in the old days, people were often separated from other communities by vast distances, with no idea how other people talked. And there was probably a greater chance to have your own dialect and strong accent, given the circumstances.

dpny
October 12th, 2011, 08:04 PM
That's ridiculous. The only mass media up until the early 1900's was newspaper and telegraph. How exactly does the written word or dot,dot,dash influence whether an area has an accent or not? If anything, the english language should be more homogenized now than ever before, because we can interact more with people from different areas.

But in the old days, people were often separated from other communities by vast distances, with no idea how other people talked. And there was probably a greater chance to have your own dialect and strong accent, given the circumstances.

1) I mistyped: I meant to say this enforced a uniformity lacking on other places;

2) Accents are directly tied to deviations from standard orthography, which is another way of saying that the growth of accents, slang and dialect are concomitant and mutually reinforcing. Remove the ability of the language to wander from that standard orthography and you remove some of the impetus for the development of accents;

3) Perhaps the thought was incomplete. The growth of mass mass communications is tied to the same industrial base which allows mass transportation. In the US it was the completion of the continental railroad which led to the mass settlement of the western half of the country. SImply put, the technology to move people around was quicker than the ability of the language of those people to differentiate from the American norm.

KiwiNZ
October 12th, 2011, 08:08 PM
Would I be the only one that doesn't like Marmite/Vegemite? <don't kill me!>

I tried cheese for the first time yesterday. It was disgusting. I don't see what the fuss is about. Anybody tell me? (although I daresay you will tell me anyways!)

Marmite and Vegemite = Axle Grease
Peanut butter = mouth cement

Pujims
October 12th, 2011, 08:10 PM
Ummmm, if you don't have graham crackers, what kind of crumbs do you make a cheesecake crust out of?

Hate to sound silly, just asking..........

nothingspecial
October 12th, 2011, 08:10 PM
Marmite and Vegemite = Axle Grease


Well, they are good for that too, but Marmite is tasty also :)

KiwiNZ
October 12th, 2011, 08:12 PM
Well, they are good for that too, but Marmite is tasty also :)

There is better ways to get those vitamins than eating something from the waste bins that were in my fathers Auto Workshops.:P

nothingspecial
October 12th, 2011, 08:17 PM
Ahhhh, but Marmite is made from the wastebins of breweries.

And as we know, recycling/reusing our waste is a good thing :)

The current advertising slogan for Marmite over here is,

"You either love it, or you hate it"

Unlike most slogans I can think of right now, that seems to be a fact.

haqking
October 12th, 2011, 08:28 PM
Ahhhh, but Marmite is made from the wastebins of breweries.

And as we know, recycling/reusing our waste is a good thing :)

The current advertising slogan for Marmite over here is,

"You either love it, or you hate it"

Unlike most slogans I can think of right now, that seems to be a fact.

very true indeed. The only advertising/marketing i have ever seen that is actually true. There is no refuting it.

you really do either love it or hate it...I LOVE IT

hyperdude111
October 12th, 2011, 08:31 PM
Just got quite annoyed with the differences today. Libre Office on 11.10 is defaulting to USA English for the spell check and no attempt to change it works. I keep being told to spell "colour" as "color" and "maximise" as "maximize". Been using the Ignore Once button a LOT.

wolfen69
October 12th, 2011, 09:12 PM
1)
3) Perhaps the thought was incomplete. The growth of mass mass communications is tied to the same industrial base which allows mass transportation. In the US it was the completion of the continental railroad which led to the mass settlement of the western half of the country. SImply put, the technology to move people around was quicker than the ability of the language of those people to differentiate from the American norm.

I understand you, but I was specifically talking about the pre-mass transportation era. But regardless of that, there are still many different accents in the US that could be differentiated even by a foreigner.

Paqman
October 12th, 2011, 10:24 PM
Ummmm, if you don't have graham crackers, what kind of crumbs do you make a cheesecake crust out of?

Hate to sound silly, just asking..........

We don't use the crackers, we actual grind up real Grahams.

dpny
October 12th, 2011, 10:55 PM
I understand you, but I was specifically talking about the pre-mass transportation era. But regardless of that, there are still many different accents in the US that could be differentiated even by a foreigner.

I didn't say there weren't. But the range of accent--the deviation from standard American English orthography--is much less than in the UK, or in other countries.

mick222
October 12th, 2011, 11:13 PM
Ummmm, if you don't have graham crackers, what kind of crumbs do you make a cheesecake crust out of?

Hate to sound silly, just asking..........

digestive biscuit

mick222
October 12th, 2011, 11:18 PM
Question for our American friends though is.. What do you call (Potato) scallops ?

Thick slice (full potato length) dipped in batter & fried



Weird Factoid


Ask for Fish & chips in a UK chippy and you'll be given Cod as the fish... Until you go north of Nottingham whereby Haddock becomes the default fish.

This causes me delays as I live in Peterborough (Midlands) and therefore I have to order Haddock on joining the queue and then wait 10 mins for it to be cooked whereas Cod is cooked and is in the "Keepa Warmerer".

Haddock being the VASTLY superior tasting fish. Cod has to be practically pickled with vinegar to give it any kind of acceptable taste ( It's a very bland taste)
Fritters in Scotland
Definitely agree about the fish got a Haddock supper as we call it in Peterbourgh and they left the skin on Horrible yuk.
Cod is only good for fish fingers.

johnnybgoode83
October 12th, 2011, 11:56 PM
Here in the UK we use all the right words and pronunciation of words

smellyman
October 13th, 2011, 12:34 AM
The British don't know how to spell. (http://www.btinternet.com/%7Etony.papard/Spelling.htm) :)

alphacrucis2
October 13th, 2011, 01:19 AM
Just got quite annoyed with the differences today. Libre Office on 11.10 is defaulting to USA English for the spell check and no attempt to change it works. I keep being told to spell "colour" as "color" and "maximise" as "maximize". Been using the Ignore Once button a LOT.

Strange. Libre Office is working fine for me in that respect.

MG&TL
October 13th, 2011, 07:38 AM
The British don't know how to spell. (http://www.btinternet.com/%7Etony.papard/Spelling.htm) :)

We were here first...:P

lisati
October 13th, 2011, 07:42 AM
The British don't know how to spell. (http://www.btinternet.com/%7Etony.papard/Spelling.htm) :)

Don't get me started on the topic of kicking donkeys! :D

smellyman
October 13th, 2011, 10:03 AM
We were here first...:P

but you don't spell like shakespeare......:P

forrestcupp
October 13th, 2011, 12:11 PM
In recent years I've noticed two distinct items of food known as "cheerios" on the supermarket. One's a breakfast cereal, the other resembles a small version of a saveloy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saveloy): I've only recently noticed the breakfast cereal version on the shelves.In the US, Cheerios has been a very popular cereal for a long, long time.


The current advertising slogan for Marmite over here is,

"You either love it, or you hate it"

Unlike most slogans I can think of right now, that seems to be a fact.That would be a good slogan for White Castles or Armour Potted Meat.


We don't use the crackers, we actual grind up real Grahams.What the heck are Grahams, anyway?


digestive biscuitThat just sounds nasty. They weren't very creative with that name. It kind of reminds me of Soylent Green.


We were here first...:PThat depends on whether you are talking to a Cauasian or an American Indian. ;)

ninjaaron
October 13th, 2011, 12:27 PM
I tried cheese for the first time yesterday. It was disgusting. I don't see what the fuss is about. Anybody tell me? (although I daresay you will tell me anyways!)Cheese is a bit like beer. There are tens if not hundreds of thousands of types around the world, and the flavor and texture depends and the aging process, the ingredience, and most importantly, the bacteria cultures used to make it. There are many cheeses that I find disgusting, but I like most of what I've tried.

Like Beer.


The whole state of Wisconsin weeps for you!

As a Wisconsinite, I can confirm that I spontaniously began weeping when this post went up.

The Cheese selection in Jerusalem generally is not great, but there are places where you can get some good stuff. The Notre Dame church just outside the old city recently opened a wine and cheese bar on the roof. Lord bless them.

ninjaaron
October 13th, 2011, 12:30 PM
That just sounds nasty. They weren't very creative with that name. It kind of reminds me of Soylent Green.

They are not. They're about like graham crackers, but they are a bit denser, and do not taste like honey. In my opinion, they are less tasty than graham crackers, but they are more substantial.

ade234uk
October 13th, 2011, 12:48 PM
I am in the UK, but over the last couple of years I have been using the word SUCKS more often.

For me it sums things up perfectly.

ade234uk
October 13th, 2011, 12:54 PM
lol. Sums up the differences perfectly. Also very funny.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=abmrAf0evgk

CharlesA
October 13th, 2011, 01:05 PM
Peanut butter = mouth cement

+1 to that. Yet I still eat it (rarely...)

haqking
October 13th, 2011, 01:26 PM
YUMMY just about to tuck into my Crumpets with Crunchy peanut butter ;-)

CharlesA
October 13th, 2011, 02:22 PM
YUMMY just about to tuck into my Crumpets with Crunchy peanut butter ;-)
Om nom nom.

Anyone for French Toast?

mips
October 13th, 2011, 03:03 PM
Are savory pies common in the US? Things like steak & kidney pie, chicken & mushroom pie, pepper steak pie, cornish pasty, quiche etc.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pie#Savory_pies

CharlesA
October 13th, 2011, 03:07 PM
I love quiche. Chicken pie too.. I know there are those, along with pot pies, but I don't think I've seen steak and kidney pie over here.

EDIT: "Over here" means the US. :p

MG&TL
October 13th, 2011, 03:43 PM
Do you have weetabix and muesli over there?

forrestcupp
October 13th, 2011, 04:48 PM
Are savory pies common in the US? Things like steak & kidney pie, chicken & mushroom pie, pepper steak pie, cornish pasty, quiche etc.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pie#Savory_pies
We have mince meat pie here, but nobody ever eats it. We also have what we call pot pies that are a little more popular. I ate a chicken pot pie the other day.

Do you British people still observe tea time regularly? Is that just another name for a normal meal, like breakfast, lunch, or dinner, or is it something completely different, like a fourth snack?

CharlesA
October 13th, 2011, 05:03 PM
I want some Earl Grey now...

Paqman
October 13th, 2011, 05:28 PM
Do you British people still observe tea time regularly?

Lol, too much Mary Poppins for this one I think. British people in the 21st century drink tea when they're thirsty, not when they're entertaining the vicar in the parlour.

Confusingly, the British refer to the evening meal as either tea or dinner, and the lunchtime one as either dinner or lunch. There's no logic to it, which is half the fun.

CharlesA
October 13th, 2011, 05:34 PM
Confusingly, the British refer to the evening meal as either tea or dinner, and the lunchtime one as either dinner or lunch. There's no logic to it, which is half the fun.

That's pretty awesome. It's more fun when you are confused. ;)

mips
October 13th, 2011, 05:42 PM
Do you British people still observe tea time regularly? Is that just another name for a normal meal, like breakfast, lunch, or dinner, or is it something completely different, like a fourth snack?

Here in SA we have two tea breaks during a working day at 10:00 & 15:00. It's called tea break due to tradition I think but it no longer means you are having tea, it's just a 15min break from work.

Ric_NYC
October 13th, 2011, 05:53 PM
I say "potaro"; you say "potato".


:)

forrestcupp
October 13th, 2011, 05:55 PM
Here in SA we have two tea breaks during a working day at 10:00 & 15:00. It's called tea break due to tradition I think but it no longer means you are having tea, it's just a 15min break from work.

When I worked in a factory, we had two 15 minute breaks and a 30 minute lunch, that usually got stretched to 25 minutes and 45 minutes. :)