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Quadunit404
October 4th, 2011, 04:17 AM
Since I have nothing else to do other than post another Windows screenshot.

Just so you know, I'm temporarily "Linux-free" (I still run Linux, but only in virtual machines for now) until I can get a tablet or netbook or whatever later this year. I removed Linux on my own decision due to poor performance compared to Windows (yes, it works on my hardware and nearly everything works to a usable extent, but it still performs worse than Windows and often crashes) as well as me not using it for more than an hour since July. But can ya really blame me? All my favorite games run on Windows and not Linux!

Wallpaper is this. (http://dadukee.deviantart.com/art/Team-Fortress-2-Soldier-251521253)

dpny
October 4th, 2011, 06:24 AM
Since I have nothing else to do other than post another Windows screenshot.

Just so you know, I'm temporarily "Linux-free" (I still run Linux, but only in virtual machines for now) until I can get a tablet or netbook or whatever later this year. I removed Linux on my own decision due to poor performance compared to Windows (yes, it works on my hardware and nearly everything works to a usable extent, but it still performs worse than Windows and often crashes) as well as me not using it for more than an hour since July. But can ya really blame me? All my favorite games run on Windows and not Linux![/URL]

Nothing wrong with running Linux in a VM. Ever since my old laptop died I haven't had any hardware on which I can install. It's all been VMs since then.

VinDSL
October 4th, 2011, 10:11 AM
with all the windows screenshots, i kind of assumed you were "linux free".
poor guy. lol :P
LoL! :D

el_koraco
October 4th, 2011, 10:54 AM
Nothing wrong with running Linux in a VM.

But what's the point? I mean, VMs are for trying out a system, for server-type virtualization or running necessary programs not available on your platform if using a desktop.

dpny
October 4th, 2011, 12:33 PM
But what's the point? I mean, VMs are for trying out a system, for server-type virtualization or running necessary programs not available on your platform if using a desktop.

Because it's the only way I'm able to run Linux at the moment, and I'd rather run it that not, just out of sheer curiosity.

el_koraco
October 4th, 2011, 12:45 PM
Because it's the only way I'm able to run Linux at the moment, and I'd rather run it that not, just out of sheer curiosity.

I guess that makes some sense. Personally, I wouldn't bother, you can run most or all Linux programs in Windows or OSX, and once you fire up a browser, it's pretty much the same thing regardless of platform.

dpny
October 4th, 2011, 01:06 PM
I guess that makes some sense. Personally, I wouldn't bother, you can run most or all Linux programs in Windows or OSX, and once you fire up a browser, it's pretty much the same thing regardless of platform.

Because it's fun to play with the OS. And virtualization's gotten so good you'd be hard pressed to tell the difference between a virtual machine and hardware.

el_koraco
October 4th, 2011, 01:18 PM
Because it's fun to play with the OS.

That's what I mean. If there's no chance that the computer won't boot because you messed with init files, there's no real fun :D

dpny
October 4th, 2011, 01:20 PM
That's what I mean. If there's no chance that the computer won't boot because you messed with init files, there's no real fun :D

Oddly enough, precisely the kind of fun I'm trying to avoid. Although my conky is currently on the fritz until I can figure out argb. . .

Pazit
October 4th, 2011, 01:44 PM
That's what I mean. If there's no chance that the computer won't boot because you messed with init files, there's no real fun :D:lolflag:

Artificial Intelligence
October 4th, 2011, 04:24 PM
Split from Screenshot thread.

MonolithImmortal
October 4th, 2011, 06:29 PM
I run Fuduntu in a VM on my windows desktop. It's nice.

Quadunit404
October 4th, 2011, 08:29 PM
I have no memory of crea-


Split from Screenshot thread.

Well that explains it.

btw, some of the responses to this thread made me laugh :lolflag:

viperdvman
October 4th, 2011, 08:38 PM
I guess that makes some sense. Personally, I wouldn't bother, you can run most or all Linux programs in Windows or OSX, and once you fire up a browser, it's pretty much the same thing regardless of platform.


Because it's fun to play with the OS. And virtualization's gotten so good you'd be hard pressed to tell the difference between a virtual machine and hardware.

It's the same reason I run Ubuntu on both of my computers, dual-booting them alongside Windows. Sure, most of the apps I have in Ubuntu are also available for Windows, I just like running something other than Windows.

Besides, Ubuntu runs faster on both my computers then both Windows XP and Windows 7, and is nowhere near as vulnerable to viruses and malware as Windows is (having 85-90% OS market share has its drawbacks).

I love how Ubuntu looks, I love how it works, and I love how easily I can change how it looks (in GNOME 2.x anyway). That's why I run Ubuntu far more than I run Windows... outside of my games and Photoshop.

KiwiNZ
October 4th, 2011, 08:50 PM
I run uBuntu on my iMac in VM Ware why? because I want to have access to uBuntu for various reason whilst I am using my iMac and I do not want to reboot and I don't want to run a "non ready" OS on my main production machine.

I also run various versions of Linux on my test machines using VM Ware for obvious reasons, testing being the primary.

For those who think using Virtual machines on a desktop is pointless, think again, it is very useful.

binary00mind
October 5th, 2011, 12:29 AM
I own few Notebooks and about a dozen portable drives (they are all small from 250-500GB) everywhere I have something installed and on every OS I have a VM.
On Win7 when I'm right now, I've 2 Ubuntus 11.04 and 11.10 plus an Iranian version of Ubuntu "AroOS" and while I'm writing this I'm installing Kubuntu 11.04...Cannot install my favored KDE apps on Ubuntu 11.04 so I'm trying to go the other way around..Try to install Full Gnome on Kubuntu 11.04...could not find any answer if that is possible with unity anywhere on the net but it is fun trying..

Linux is the way to fly...There is no way that you can have a running system for 6 months (like I once had such a run) without loosing a responsive beat on Windows.
When Adobe makes CS 6 beta for Linux I might say goodbye to Windows for good.

wolfen69
October 5th, 2011, 12:35 AM
I tried ubuntu in vbox with windows as the host, and windows choked on it. Absolutely horrible performance. But with linux as the host, and windows as the guest, it runs beautifully.

But I would buy a new computer if I had a machine that couldn't run linux properly. My computing freedoms are that important to me. Others not so much.

Quadunit404
October 5th, 2011, 12:37 AM
I run uBuntu on my iMac in VM Ware why? because I want to have access to uBuntu for various reason whilst I am using my iMac and I do not want to reboot and I don't want to run a "non ready" OS on my main production machine.

I also run various versions of Linux on my test machines using VM Ware for obvious reasons, testing being the primary.

For those who think using Virtual machines on a desktop is pointless, think again, it is very useful.

This.

Also, running Linux in a VM can be a way of "trialling" a distro to see what it's like and if it's really something you'd want to use before testing it on your actual hardware and installing it.

I also use virtual machines to use software designed for legacy operating systems (e.g. pre-XP releases of Windows, MS-DOS) without having to use things like compatibility layers or emulation. There are quite a few benefits to using virtual machines (either as testbeds or for running legacy software) that most of you haven't realized yet.

el_koraco
October 5th, 2011, 01:22 AM
that most of you haven't realized yet.

:bows at the expertize and experience:

I said I understand running OSiz for compatibility, testing and server virtualization. The compatibility part keeps a subset of users having Windows in a VM. That's also understandable. What I don't understand is the trend towards running lasting copies of Linux in WMs that's going on on these forums. But whatever, I also don't like tomatoes, and most people are crazy about them.