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TerniT
September 21st, 2011, 09:20 PM
First of all i'm not sure is this the right section of the forum to post a request like this, i wont mind a mod moving it, but here it goes.

My adventure with linux started around 10 years ago with some Red Hat based distro. Since then i really wanted to learn the ins and outs of linux/unix as it something i had interest in. Unfortunetly back then my 19600bps modem with pre paid connection time, shared with family plus a learning disability was not enough to research everything i needed to understand the system. I took the easy way and followed the herd into the "Windows canyon". Now after those all years of ignorance and mindless clicking i seem to have trouble finding my way back to the free plains of Linux/Unix.

Is there anyone out there who would guide me for a while and help me understand Linux/Unix and show me the way out of the "Windows canyon" as it seems i'm to deep in it to get out myself.

ibutho
September 21st, 2011, 09:26 PM
Hi and welcome to the forum.

Is there a Linux User Group near where you are? If so, I suggest you get in touch with them, attend a meeting and get face to face help.

josephmills
September 21st, 2011, 09:28 PM
Hi there and Welcome to the forums !!

I would like to point out a system like that there there is all ready it is called the ubuntu beginners team
https://wiki.ubuntu.com/BeginnersTeam

if you like I also have a website that is under construction but there is a hole ubuntu training sections that has all the VTC training videos a bit old but will help I am also making my own training videos which should be done by dec.
http://ourshare.tk/?videoscategory=ubuntu-training

there is also other places on irc to get help

launchpad is also a great place to get help

I would also look for local groups and LUG and FOSS

hope that this helps
Joseph


ps let me know area of focus that you would like to study thanks again

jvance492
September 21st, 2011, 09:31 PM
Learn the commands

Start with a fresh install of ubuntu and get familiar with file permissions, and sudo

learn the man command

"man sudo"

This will tell you all the options of sudo.

Don't know a command? Geuss! It will try to find the command for you.

This is a great forum to search for answers to your questions.

The best practice is practice.

uRock
September 21st, 2011, 09:33 PM
Moved to the Community Cafe.

josephmills
September 21st, 2011, 09:37 PM
Learn the commands

Start with a fresh install of ubuntu and get familiar with file permissions, and sudo

learn the man command

"man sudo"

This will tell you all the options of sudo.

Don't know a command? Geuss! It will try to find the command for you.

This is a great forum to search for answers to your questions.

The best practice is practice.


to find all the man pages we use the command

apropos all


check it out with the command
man apropos

jvance492
September 21st, 2011, 09:39 PM
http://linux.about.com/od/ubuntu_doc/a/ubudg24t1.htm

MG&TL
September 21st, 2011, 09:44 PM
LinuxCommand.org

I'd love it if something like this did happen, but probably your best bet, as mentioned, is a LUG or the beginners' team.

Maybe you should set something more direct than beginners' team up. Like an online LUG. I would be happy to give email lessons, if only I knew anything myself. I daresay there will be like-minded people, there always is. Just a thought.

Actually, if you want to give me email in PM, I have nothing better to do oftentimes, I can take you through ABSOLUTE basics. No further. And you would probably learn faster from a website. It depends what you want to know. :) But there's always human support on the forum.

TerniT
September 21st, 2011, 09:46 PM
Thanks for the comments lads. Really helpful. I'm gona start asap and try learn something. Found a LUG in my area which is great. I never knew those existed. Now its time to read those manuals and hope i'll understand them.

Thanks again.

MG&TL
September 21st, 2011, 09:51 PM
Often the manual can be a bit cryptic. Some commands have a more user-friendly and brief --help option.


command --help

IMO, anyways. If something's manual looks huge, see if it has a --help option, and come back to the manpage when you have the gist. No point in wearing out your head on ALL the options of the copy command.

josephmills
September 21st, 2011, 09:57 PM
I would also say start out like this
1) the histroy of gnu/linux
2) learning the interface IE unity/kde/lxde/gnome/flux ect
3) learn how to use a program
4) learn how to install programs / install virtual box for testing
5) learn the file system from root to home in that order learn how each file works together to make the os run.
6) learn how to move around the command line and basics of using bash
7)learn more about the command line
8) learn about wireless/networking and how it works with linux what are mods what is a black list? what is firmware ? what is tcp udp ect
9) learn about wine and other windoz programs that run on linux
10) learn about debian and how ubuntu uses them
11) learn how a live boot works
12) learn about partitions on hard drives and how they work
13) learn how to write basic scripts and how to implant them into the menu
14) learn about security and how it works like this

information gathering
recon/ enumeration
passive and non-passive scans
google dorks
port scanning
os fingerprinting
venerability scanning
exploit and gaining access
keeping access/root kits
erasing tracks
15) take your time as none of this will come over night
16) programming languages
bash
perl
c
c++
so on
hope that this helps


also the list might not be in the greatest order if someone would like to remake list that would also help me thanks
Joseph

josephmills
September 21st, 2011, 09:59 PM
often the manual can be a bit cryptic. Some commands have a more user-friendly and brief --help option.


command --help

imo, anyways. If something's manual looks huge, see if it has a --help option, and come back to the manpage when you have the gist. No point in wearing out your head on all the options of the copy command.

+1

ninjaaron
September 21st, 2011, 10:33 PM
I'll be your mentor, but I have to warn you that I've only been using Linux for three years, and I don't know what I'm doing, and I only recenlty managed to scramble out of the "windowed canyon" myself. :P

Great expression, by the way. "Windowed Canyon." That's some beautiful use of language. Is it yours or did you get it somewhere else?

[edit] oh. wait. you said "Windows Canyon..." not "windowed" canyon, as in GUI apps in general. I prefer my mis-read. I think I'll continue reading it incorrectly

ajgreeny
September 21st, 2011, 10:47 PM
For a huge man output it can be a lot easier to view it in the gnome help application, yelp. In the box at the top type man:command, eg man:find and you can then use the edit menu item to search the output text for a particular word.

It can save a lot of time scrolling down a huge man output for a single entry, which you mighty easily miss.

ninjaaron
September 21st, 2011, 10:49 PM
For a huge man output it can be a lot easier to view it in the gnome help application, yelp. In the box at the top type man:command, eg man:find and you can then use the edit menu item to search the output text for a particular word.

It can save a lot of time scrolling down a huge man output for a single entry, which you mighty easily miss.

or just type a "/" to search the entry.

:P

ajgreeny
September 21st, 2011, 10:56 PM
or just type a "/" to search the entry.

:P
Thanks for that info; it's something I wasn't aware of. I still think it is easier to use the Edit->find menu entry in gnome-help, but this is still useful.

ninjaaron
September 21st, 2011, 11:06 PM
I seriously don't mean to sound like a jerk, but how can going all the way up to Edit>Find be easier than typing a slash?

BTW, use 'n' for "find next" and 'N' for "find previous."

You can navigate man pages with more or less the same commands you use to navigate text files in VI or VIM. Console apps are all about the Unix legacy keybindings (aka: vi).

wolfen69
September 22nd, 2011, 02:50 AM
I charge $70 an hour. Is that OK?

Porcini M.
September 22nd, 2011, 04:48 AM
Padwan Learner

ajgreeny
September 22nd, 2011, 10:31 AM
I seriously don't mean to sound like a jerk, but how can going all the way up to Edit>Find be easier than typing a slash?

BTW, use 'n' for "find next" and 'N' for "find previous."

You can navigate man pages with more or less the same commands you use to navigate text files in VI or VIM. Console apps are all about the Unix legacy keybindings (aka: vi).
Great information for those that use and know vi or vim, but like a lot of others, if I need to use a cli text editor I go to nano, not vi or vim. I still think that for the majority of people, it is far easier for users to use gnome-help and then search as if in a word processor type application.

Using the more arcane commands etc etc of vi may be great if you are a real linux cli advocate, but most are not, hence my comments about using the gnome-help way.

ninjaaron
September 22nd, 2011, 11:20 AM
Great information for those that use and know vi or vim, but like a lot of others, if I need to use a cli text editor I go to nano, not vi or vim. I still think that for the majority of people, it is far easier for users to use gnome-help and then search as if in a word processor type application.

Using the more arcane commands etc etc of vi may be great if you are a real linux cli advocate, but most are not, hence my comments about using the gnome-help way.

Well, if you really, really want to get it into 'something like' a word processor, there is always this handy command I came up with before I started using vim:


echo "`man COMMAND`" > ~/Documents/COMMAND-help

This will create a text file with the contents of the man page for "COMMAND" in your Documents folder, which you can open in any editor you like, and therefore allows you to search using whatever method you prefer and make personal annotations for future reference.

TERMINALS ARE NEAT!

btw, I wouldn't consider myself a "cli advocate." I've just found that the command line is the easiest way for me to do most things, after a very short (and only slightly painful) period of learning. I tend to be quite verbose, so maybe controlling the computer with words is more natural for me that controlling it through images and metaphores.

kleskjr
September 22nd, 2011, 11:25 AM
Recently I watched a TED talk from a guy called Khan. He established something like online school were students are mentored by other students. http://www.khanacademy.org/
Seeing something like that for Linux could be useful for many people.

BrokenKingpin
September 22nd, 2011, 06:04 PM
The best approach would be to just jump in and start using it. Install Ubuntu and play around with it and learn as you go.

When I first switched to Linux (almost a decade ago) I just tried to accomplish my daily tasks I did in Windows under Linux, and if I hit a problem I would Google and find the solution. After a few months of using Linux full time you get the basic idea of how to do most things.