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View Full Version : [SOLVED] What is a good place to learn how to program?



3602
June 5th, 2011, 09:38 PM
I foresee much free time on hands. I'd like to learn one of the following three: Python, Perl, Vala.
I have no previous programming experience other than playing around in EM-BASIC and TI-BASIC, the latter being the editor in higher-end Texas Instruments graphers. So basically I can't just go ahead and jump in one of the three, right?
I've got Python 2.6 and Valide right now.
Thank you very much.

simeon87
June 5th, 2011, 09:41 PM
Yes you can, why not? Choose a language, find some tutorials and start writing code!:popcorn:

CoffeeRain
June 5th, 2011, 09:44 PM
Yeah, learn a language! How else would you learn one? Python is the only one of those that I know, so I can't give help on the others, but the Google Python classes helped me out GREATLY. You can get to know the basics and not so basic stuff in that. Just go to youtube and search google python class.

3602
June 5th, 2011, 10:00 PM
Yes you can, why not? Choose a language, find some tutorials and start writing code!:popcorn:
I've always believed that to learn programming is much like learning math. You don't go solve Fermat's theorem first. You learn BASIC and ladder-up from there. Of course, this might be wrong on many levels...
I went to Python's site. Basically they say "For programmers, go here... For non-programmers, go here..."

r-senior
June 5th, 2011, 10:18 PM
I like the tutorials here:

http://zetcode.com/

I like them because they give a flavour of the things they cover without a huge investment of time. It would be interesting to hear how they work for a complete beginner.

wmcbrine
June 6th, 2011, 12:30 AM
Of course, this might be wrong on many levels...Yes. I mean, sure, that's what I did, but that was decades ago. BASIC is mostly obsolete today. Python is beginner-friendly, while being powerful enough to take you as far as you like. All that starting with BASIC would get you would be artificial constraints on what you could do.

I wouldn't start with Perl, though.

The one thing I will say in BASIC's favor -- and here I mean strictly old 8-bit BASIC, not Visual Basic or the like -- is that it typically gave you easy (but non-portable) access to things like graphics and sound, which if nothing else make learning programming more fun. On a modern system, this kind of access has perversely become harder to get -- GUIs are powerful, but complicated to work with. But a library like Pygame might be enough to make it easy to play with graphics and sound. (I haven't used Pygame yet myself, only SDL, in C, on which Pygame is based. But SDL was really simple, and I figure it's gotta be even easier in Python. Maybe.)

juancarlospaco
June 6th, 2011, 01:19 AM
You dont need math to code.

(unless you are making a physics 3D engine on assembler or something like that)

Grafens
June 6th, 2011, 02:22 AM
I like the tutorials here:

http://zetcode.com/

I like them because they give a flavour of the things they cover without a huge investment of time. It would be interesting to hear how they work for a complete beginner.

I'm not a programmer I'm just starting to learn. This is a great site for beginners.



I went to Python's site. Basically they say "For programmers, go here... For non-programmers, go here..."

Python.org has some very good links to pdf tutorials,
Here http://wiki.python.org/moin/BeginnersGuide/NonProgrammers
Did you see these links.

wmcbrine
June 6th, 2011, 08:07 AM
You dont need math to code.That's not what he was talking about. He was just making an analogy.

Also, if the implication is that someone who doesn't like math can still be a good programmer... I disagree. You may not directly need math, but it's the same kind of thinking, and if you have difficulty with one, I'm pretty sure you'll have trouble with the other, too.

Petrolea
June 6th, 2011, 12:06 PM
That's not what he was talking about. He was just making an analogy.

Also, if the implication is that someone who doesn't like math can still be a good programmer... I disagree. You may not directly need math, but it's the same kind of thinking, and if you have difficulty with one, I'm pretty sure you'll have trouble with the other, too.

I agree 100%. In programming math is also important even if you don't use it directly. Without logic you can't really program because programming can be described as "writing a logical connection of code to solve a problem".

But for beginners, I would say Python out of those 3 (even though I like Vala more but for beginner it might be a bit harder).

3602
June 6th, 2011, 01:35 PM
Alright thanks y'all. Imma lemme have some fun here...

wmcbrine
June 6th, 2011, 09:45 PM
And here's a piece that makes me rethink what I just said, or at least, slightly revise it:

http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2011/06/how-i-failed-failed-and-finally-succeeded-at-learning-how-to-code/239855/

(It's more about how both math and programming are poorly taught than about the link or lack of one per se.)

nmaster
June 6th, 2011, 10:07 PM
And here's a piece that makes me rethink what I just said, or at least, slightly revise it:

http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2011/06/how-i-failed-failed-and-finally-succeeded-at-learning-how-to-code/239855/

(It's more about how both math and programming are poorly taught than about the link or lack of one per se.)

here is a better link to address this tangent: http://www.maa.org/devlin/devlin_10_00.html

Astrognomical
June 7th, 2011, 06:53 AM
For python i'd recommend googling "diveintopython"
I skipped some of this thread, so I don't know if this helps. A good tip is to change how you think of things. For instance, if your waiting at the door for a package, instead of thinking, "when the doorbell rings, I'll get my package if it's the mail man" think "if the doorbell rings and it's the mail man, I will get my package."

nzjethro
June 7th, 2011, 06:59 AM
The way I learned (admittedly I'm still at a very basic level) was exactly what you suggested. Jump right in. Have youtube or the Python forums handy. Look around for cool looking things to write code for (e.g. clone pong or pacman, write a noughts and crosses AI, write a simple database; all of these are great for applying the basics). From there, you'll start getting into the coding frame of mind. And Python's a very logical language, very easy to learn, so you'll be flying soon.

ThatCoolGuy220
June 7th, 2011, 01:45 PM
Its not that hard it deppends o how deep you want to go, its very fun once you get the basics.

u have played pranks to my cousins hahahaa its so fun, Im currently learning C++

but you can learn whatever yiut hearth want