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spikoley
May 31st, 2011, 06:08 PM
Intel just announce plans for the Ultrabook (http://news.cnet.com/8301-17938_105-20067553-1/can-intels-ultrabook-concept-succeed/). It is a thin laptop like the MacBook Air. What do you guys think?

krapp
May 31st, 2011, 06:14 PM
Looks like a non-story. Yet another marketing gimmick to repackage an existing product. This a portable, rather spartan laptop for people willing to pay more than what the socalled netbooks generally cost. And unless I'm mistaken, Intel is not making a laptop; they're just trying to get OEM to make "ultrabooks." I'm a fan of netbooks btw.

giddyup306
May 31st, 2011, 07:08 PM
It is a thin laptop like the MacBook Air. What do you guys think?


If it materializes, I'm sure it will be a piece of garbage. Asus products are cheap junk. *Says that as he types on his G73*

krapp
May 31st, 2011, 07:44 PM
If it materializes, I'm sure it will be a piece of garbage. Asus products are cheap junk. *Says that as he types on his G73*

I rather like Asus.

Mars11
September 4th, 2011, 04:37 PM
Lets hope that we'll be able to install Ubuntu fairly easily on these new Ultrabooks.

IWantFroyo
September 4th, 2011, 04:51 PM
I can't see myself using one. I definitely prefer trading portability for power and screen size.

I use laptops because it lets me move my workspace as much as I want. I don't like being tethered down to one particular spot.

Warpnow
September 4th, 2011, 05:13 PM
I just wish there was a laptop on the market with decent battery life.

The Timeline is promising, but they seem difficult to find except online, and I'd really like to see one in person if I were going to buy.

LMP900
September 4th, 2011, 08:00 PM
Lets hope that we'll be able to install Ubuntu fairly easily on these new Ultrabooks.

I'm hoping for that as well. I have an 8.9" netbook that feels too small and a 14.1" notebook that feels too heavy. I think an 11.6" Ubuntu Ultrabook is what I've been waiting for.

Lightstar
September 4th, 2011, 10:12 PM
I'm sure Apple will find a subject to sue intel with :P

That's how they roll

snip3r8
September 4th, 2011, 10:55 PM
I'm sure Apple will find a subject to sue intel with :P

That's how they roll

intel produces the mobo and cpu for macbook air so chances are they just stuck an asus case over the thing and loaded windows...If these laptops are only slightly cheaper than a macbook air ide still buy an air instead, apple seem to have succeeded with the laptop touchpad where everyone else has failed.

Copper Bezel
September 4th, 2011, 11:40 PM
Old and dead post. These have shipped, I think. They are pretty, they are expensive, and I want one. Aluminium keys. Bugwah.

I like when manufacturers put some cost into the build quality and aesthetic of the shell instead of selling on just the internals.


I'm hoping for that as well. I have an 8.9" netbook that feels too small and a 14.1" notebook that feels too heavy. I think an 11.6" Ubuntu Ultrabook is what I've been waiting for.
Yes, quite. A 10.1" screen is fine for me, but that extra inch would make a world of difference without much affecting portability.

And Asus is one of the very few marks I trust.

Mars11
September 4th, 2011, 11:49 PM
They haven't shipped yet.

LowSky
September 5th, 2011, 12:28 AM
Yes, quite. A 10.1" screen is fine for me, but that extra inch would make a world of difference without much affecting portability.

And Asus is one of the very few marks I trust.


10.1" isn't enough. and 1" isn't going to make a difference. I need at least a 12.5" screen or its too small.

IWantFroyo
September 5th, 2011, 12:52 AM
apple seem to have succeeded with the laptop touchpad where everyone else has failed.

My Toshiba T235D has the absolute best touchpad I've ever used. Mouses feel almost alien to me, now. Sadly, most of Toshiba's other touchpads are quite horrid.

I'd take my Toshiba's touchpad any day over an Apple one, but Apple is consistent here. Although I buy Toshiba, I make sure I can get my hands on a model before I buy, just to make sure the touchpad is up to par.

Copper Bezel
September 5th, 2011, 01:00 AM
I love my Eee's - it's predictable and solid, the one, two, and three-finger tapping works as it's meant to, and web browsing particularly is a nicely "tactile" experience - but I've had poor luck with others. I don't know enough to predict whether it's the brand or simply luck.

aeronutt
September 5th, 2011, 01:07 AM
I just wish there was a laptop on the market with decent battery life.

The Timeline is promising, but they seem difficult to find except online, and I'd really like to see one in person if I were going to buy.

How much battery life are you looking for? FYI, I get well over 4 hours on my Dell running 11.04 with graphics disabled. (That's w/o the bigger battery.)

Lucradia
September 5th, 2011, 04:23 AM
I rather like Asus.

As I said in another thread, ASUS, Lenovo and eurocom are the best in terms of laptops now. However, I shun the ultrabook.

The Ultrabook requires these things to have the processor it boasts:

- LED Monitor (Large Price Increase, only to help the battery acheive the 3-4 hours.)

- Higher Capacity Battery (But this means a slight price hike, even though you still only get about 3-4 hours as per normal gaming laptop.)

- No CD-ROM Drive (Price Reduction unless a media card reader is placed, especially PC-CARD. Then no change. More than one USB Port increases the price.)

- SSD << A serious must for the battery. (Large price increase due to low demand. Same as LED Monitor above.)

Sacrifices are needed, as such to make the battery worth while. I will not by an ultrabook as such. Also, I don't like Intel anyway.

Warpnow
September 5th, 2011, 06:50 AM
How much battery life are you looking for? FYI, I get well over 4 hours on my Dell running 11.04 with graphics disabled. (That's w/o the bigger battery.)

The timeline is supposed to get over 10 hours.

ninjaaron
September 5th, 2011, 07:12 AM
Lets hope that we'll be able to install Ubuntu fairly easily on these new Ultrabooks.

It will be, as I'm sure they're filled with intel chips.

andras artois
September 5th, 2011, 11:43 PM
I would LOVE a Macbook Air but if I'm dropping 1300 on a laptop I want it to work with other stuff. The OS I don't care about. What I do care about is why, unlike other manufacturers, it doesn't use USB as the LightPeak port. Seriously?! Not only would it create 3 USB ports instead of 2 but it would make life a lot easier for everyone. It would also provide a simple excuse (if needed) to support USB 3.

I understand that Apple will license their Display Port Light-Peak to manufacturers to make accessories. It's a fantastic income for very little work but it's bad. I could understand if it offered something better than Sony's, or anyone else's, equivalent but it doesn't. It's only negatives.

Intel's standard for Ultrabook's is a fantastic idea. Macbook Air style designs but with arguable improvements. If anything it's worth it just to push other companies to innovate instead of the usual, 'oh sh*t, Apple's come out with something that looks nice and people buy it. lets copy it blindly rather than coming up with something better. (obviously not that case for every case but it is a generalisation).

It'll also hopefully push various technological improvements (fitting processors in smaller area's whilst producing less heat and more raw processing power).

BeRoot ReBoot
September 6th, 2011, 12:24 AM
- LED Monitor (Large Price Increase, only to help the battery acheive the 3-4 hours.)

LED monitors also have better viewing angles and less reflection, meaning it'll look better if you plan on ever taking it outside your basement.


- Higher Capacity Battery (But this means a slight price hike, even though you still only get about 3-4 hours as per normal gaming laptop.)

The intel spec says 5-7 hours, though we've yet to see how much this amounts to in practical use.


- No CD-ROM Drive (Price Reduction unless a media card reader is placed, especially PC-CARD. Then no change. More than one USB Port increases the price.)

The only reason people still use optical drives is because PC companies are still selling them. It's as outdated as the magnetic tape, let it die already.


- SSD << A serious must for the battery. (Large price increase due to low demand. Same as LED Monitor above.)

SSDs also improve performance significantly, meaning I/O is no longer the bottleneck.


All in all, ME GUSTA. I'm probably getting one next year, once they start shipping models with Ivy Bridge.

IWantFroyo
September 6th, 2011, 12:32 AM
The only reason people still use optical drives is because PC companies are still selling them. It's as outdated as the magnetic tape, let it die already.

Unless I'm missing something, CDs are still the best way to install an ISO image, which is the default.
I really do with .imgs were more popular, but while ISO is still the standard, optical drives will live.

andras artois
September 6th, 2011, 01:57 AM
Unless I'm missing something, CDs are still the best way to install an ISO image, which is the default.
I really do with .imgs were more popular, but while ISO is still the standard, optical drives will live.

Yes and while people still use optical drives, people of the future will continue to facepalm into infinite because tape drives totally worked fine as well.

Infact I'm pretty sure pen, paper and filing cabinets worked fine as well, so better stick to those as well. While we're at it we might as well stop all technological progression because everythings fine right now.

3rdalbum
September 6th, 2011, 02:10 AM
Yes and while people still use optical drives, people of the future will continue to facepalm into infinite because tape drives totally worked fine as well.

Optical drives are very useful. You can still burn DVDs for other people, give large files to others without worrying about getting your flash drive or HDD back, install multi-gigabyte programs and operating systems, watch or rip DVDs, etc.

Just because application delivery and broadband are getting better, doesn't mean that they're ready yet to replace ye olde optical drive.

I don't think the ultrabooks need a built-in optical drive, but on the same token I think a lot of people would need an external optical drive if their computer didn't already come with one.

Copper Bezel
September 6th, 2011, 02:16 AM
Yeah, my external optical is how I watch movies, and it's still better and more dependable for doing a live boot than a flash drive.

PhillyPhil
September 6th, 2011, 03:19 AM
I just wish there was a laptop on the market with decent battery life.


Are you including small laptops (netbooks)? Mine has an advertised life of 14 hours, and there are others with 13.5, 15, etc hours advertised.


10.1" isn't enough. and 1" isn't going to make a difference. I need at least a 12.5" screen or its too small.

12.4" would be too small?



- LED Monitor (Large Price Increase, only to help the battery acheive the 3-4 hours.)


Er, if you can find a new laptop *without* an LED screen (except for OLED screens etc on phones, an "LED screen" means an LCD with LED backlighting) I'll be very surprised.

Copper Bezel
September 6th, 2011, 05:33 AM
Indeed. I was a little amused at the list, since they're all standard to a decent netbook.

To elaborate on the bit LowSky and I disagreed on, given the difference to me between a 9" screen (a dumb toy) and a 10" (a reasonably usable workspace,) I personally think that one more inch would help a great deal, but I'm not going to find fault in someone not wanting to go under 13", either.

sanz
September 6th, 2011, 07:08 AM
I'm a bit amused at your being amused.
Netbooks are outdated already, and supposed to be replaced partly by xPad and paratly by UltraBook. And the difference between a Netbook and an Ultrabook is the "power". You can run almost all average programs for your daily use and work on UltraBook, without big difference of speed with common Notebooks. Imagine: Photoshop, AutoCAD, WarCraft...

sanz
September 6th, 2011, 07:17 AM
Yeah, my external optical is how I watch movies, and it's still better and more dependable for doing a live boot than a flash drive.

How can you stand for the noise and heat generated by an CD-ROM while watching movie? Have you tried movie on USB-HDD or even USB flash disk?

Why it's still better and dependable with a CD-Rom? I'm really interested what makes you into such a judgement.

In fact, I do have CD-ROM/Writer on my laptop, but I pulled it out and throw it away long long ago, to save the weight, perhaps a bit power also. I've not touched a CD-ROM for several years.

snip3r8
September 6th, 2011, 08:45 AM
LED monitors also have better viewing angles and less reflection, meaning it'll look better if you plan on ever taking it outside your basement.

LED monitors are also so bright it feels like looking directly at the sun when you are tired or have just woken up,I am the latter.

mikewhatever
September 6th, 2011, 08:56 AM
I'd be interested to know if there is any Linux support yet. Given the recent bad press about partial or non-existent Linux support of Intel's Sandy Bridge and Intel's GMA500, I want to be extra careful picking Intel's hardware.

Copper Bezel
September 6th, 2011, 10:00 AM
How can you stand for the noise and heat generated by an CD-ROM while watching movie? Have you tried movie on USB-HDD or even USB flash disk?

...

How could the noise and heat possibly be a problem at the same time? But neither is remotely noticeable. The drive is quieter than my fan, and it's sitting on the desk....


I'm a bit amused at your being amused.
Netbooks are outdated already, and supposed to be replaced partly by xPad and paratly by UltraBook. And the difference between a Netbook and an Ultrabook is the "power". You can run almost all average programs for your daily use and work on UltraBook, without big difference of speed with common Notebooks. Imagine: Photoshop, AutoCAD, WarCraft...
Being concerned about power is outdated, frankly, for a lot of users. GIMP runs just fine on netbook specs. I just wish I had a higher display res without adding an external.

Edit: And you're taking my response out of any kind of context, anyway. I wasn't saying that Lucradia is silly for imagining a machine that doesn't have those things. I was saying that they're standard now, so if we're talking about a new line being released right now, we can take them for granted.

el_koraco
September 6th, 2011, 10:46 AM
No thanks, nothing below 15,6 for me, since my laptop is also my TV (don't have a TV or an external monitor, don't plan on getting either). Plus, since I've switched to tiling WMs, a nice looking casing would be out of place. It's gonna be a Thinkpad once the time comes to upgrade.

BeRoot ReBoot
September 6th, 2011, 01:54 PM
LED monitors are also so bright it feels like looking directly at the sun when you are tired or have just woken up,I am the latter.

Well gee, if only there was a way to adjust the brightness...

snip3r8
September 6th, 2011, 02:35 PM
Well gee, if only there was a way to adjust the brightness...

But then i have to ajust it again when im properly awake

Lucradia
September 6th, 2011, 07:24 PM
Thin laptops also have little or no fans at all, you wouldn't be able to game very easily on them.

el_koraco
September 6th, 2011, 07:39 PM
Thin laptops also have little or no fans at all, you wouldn't be able to game very easily on them.

What's up with you and games, they're sure as hell not made for gaming.

gutterslob
September 6th, 2011, 08:59 PM
I'd be interested to know if there is any Linux support yet. Given the recent bad press about partial or non-existent Linux support of Intel's Sandy Bridge and Intel's GMA500, I want to be extra careful picking Intel's hardware.Intel admitted they dropped the ball with Sandy Bridge. They've promised good support for IvyBridge right out of the door, but we can only speculate as of right now.

With regards to the "ultrabooks" (seriously, where do they get these names?), I'm actually quite interested. Will skip upcoming Sandy Bridge offerings, but I might spring for an Ivy Bridge model next year if Linux support is good. Also hoping for double-digit battery life. I'll still be using a desktop/workstation for my main work, obviously.

Hopefully Lenovo/IBM will have UltraThinkpads out by then, or maybe I'll get a Jap mate to purchase a Fujitsu (their domestic models are way better than what they offer us international folk). Just have to wait and see for now.

Lucradia
September 6th, 2011, 09:03 PM
What's up with you and games, they're sure as hell not made for gaming.

Then why are they even in their own class as "ultrabooks"? They should stay with "ultraportable."

el_koraco
September 6th, 2011, 09:17 PM
Intel admitted they dropped the ball with Sandy Bridge.

Yeah, but those glitches have mostly been sorted out by now, haven't they? Although, if I were buying a machine right now, I'd probably go for a later GMA HD, my sister's got one of those (4500 I think) and it runs everything you throw at it like a champ (normal stuff, Lucradia, not games). Gawd, every time I have to go to a 640x400 getty and my laptop gets hot enough to boil an egg I find myself daydreaming about an Intel chip.

Copper Bezel
September 6th, 2011, 11:13 PM
No thanks, nothing below 15,6 for me, since my laptop is also my TV (don't have a TV or an external monitor, don't plan on getting either). Plus, since I've switched to tiling WMs, a nice looking casing would be out of place. It's gonna be a Thinkpad once the time comes to upgrade.
See, and I was just thinking that an all-aluminium case is the only thing that would bring your ugly-*** tilers a touch of class. = )

el_koraco
September 6th, 2011, 11:17 PM
See, and I was just thinking that an all-aluminium case is the only thing that would bring your ugly-*** tilers a touch of class. = )

Nup, it's the fugliness aesthetic. And the thing is called scrotum, it's hardly gonna be prettied up by a case.

PhillyPhil
September 7th, 2011, 04:02 AM
Then why are they even in their own class as "ultrabooks"? They should stay with "ultraportable."

"Ultrabook" is just marketing term, coined by Intel.
Sort of like "netbook", but at least netbook has a vaguely discernible boundary: <=10" screen (I know recently larger laptops have also tried to be marketed as "netbooks", but still...)

"Ultrabook" on the other hand is even more meaningless, because there there isn't a single characteristic that consistently distinguishes it from a "laptop/notebook". Pretty much all future laptops will eventually be able to be called "ultrabooks" according to Intel, so will we then stop using the term "noteook"? Companies declaring new names for "classes" of devices is just silly, specially when devices in that class already exist...



I'm a bit amused at your being amused.
Netbooks are outdated already, and supposed to be replaced partly by xPad and paratly by UltraBook. And the difference between a Netbook and an Ultrabook is the "power". You can run almost all average programs for your daily use and work on UltraBook, without big difference of speed with common Notebooks. Imagine: Photoshop, AutoCAD, WarCraft...

I wonder what you think "ultrabooks" (I'm already getting really tired of having to type that) are?
They're notebooks, they're just thin and have SSDs (no revolution there).
They won't replace netbooks because they aren't as small as netbooks. Tablets can't replace netbooks because they don't have keyboards. Sure they can encroach into the netbook market, but they can't obliterate them. There isn't a single class of device that's superior to any other class in every single way.

Personally I'd like to avoid this ridiculous term altogether. We're just talking about future notebooks here: optical drives are already obsolete IMHO (I'll never buy another), OEMs are always trying to make their devices thinner, and the transition from HDD to SSD has been well underway for quite a while.

sanz
September 7th, 2011, 05:33 AM
I wonder what you think "ultrabooks" (I'm already getting really tired of having to type that) are?
They're notebooks, they're just thin and have SSDs (no revolution there).
They won't replace netbooks because they aren't as small as netbooks. Tablets can't replace netbooks because they don't have keyboards. Sure they can encroach into the netbook market, but they can't obliterate them. There isn't a single class of device that's superior to any other class in every single way.

IMEMHO: Mature UltraBooks(I'm loving this term, lol...), will be powered by standard-voltage mainstream CPU soon, not ULV/LV or even mobile phone chips as in Netbooks. Netbook is in history already, as I feel. There is just no niche for it. Definitely it will be replaced by tablets and ultrabooks. In fact, netbook was just a compromsie based on notebook, to achieve bettre portability...
ultrabook's size will range from 10"~13", while tablets will range frorm 7"~11", I guess. The only reason for a netbook will be much lower price than notebooks and indispensableness of physical keyboard. I do not see any circumstance when I would choose a netbook instead of a stylish tablet or a powerful and also-stylish ultrabook with a price less than 1000.

Lucradia
September 7th, 2011, 05:36 AM
IMEMHO: Mature UltraBooks(I'm loving this term, lol...), will be powered by standard-voltage mainstream CPU soon, not ULV/LV or even mobile phone chips as in Netbooks. Netbook is in history already, as I feel. There is just no niche for it. Definitely it will be replaced by tablets and ultrabooks. In fact, netbook was just a compromsie based on notebook, to achieve bettre portability...
ultrabook's size will range from 10"~13", while tablets will range frorm 7"~11", I guess. The only reason for a netbook will be much lower price than notebooks and indispensableness of physical keyboard. I do not see any circumstance when I would choose a netbook instead of a stylish tablet or a powerful and also-stylish ultrabook with a price less than 1000.

Pretty sure ultrabooks can go up to 17 inches like laptops.

Copper Bezel
September 7th, 2011, 07:16 AM
Because the word means nothing. = )

Sanz, a 10" "ultrabook" would be a netbook form factor, and a 15" "ultrabook" would be a notebook form factor, and so on. There will quite likely be smaller, less capable and larger, more capable notebooks for the foreseeable future. And they're all still notebooks. Marketing words like "netbook" and "ultrabook" have no bearing on the things that they actually describe.

el_koraco
September 7th, 2011, 08:02 AM
Marketing words like "netbook" and "ultrabook" have no bearing on the things that they actually describe.

Of course they do, the trick to getting legions of parrots screaming "post-pc era" to buy a netbook is to call it "ultrabook".

fsando
September 7th, 2011, 09:10 AM
Basically ultrabook seems to mean "Mac Air without OSX" which I find VERY attractive.
Like this:
http://www.slashgear.com/lenovo-u300s-ultraportable-laptop-revealed-01175972/

gutterslob
September 7th, 2011, 11:16 AM
IMEMHO: Mature UltraBooks(I'm loving this term, lol...), will be powered by standard-voltage mainstream CPU soon, not ULV/LV or even mobile phone chips as in Netbooks. Netbook is in history already, as I feel. There is just no niche for it. Definitely it will be replaced by tablets and ultrabooks. In fact, netbook was just a compromsie based on notebook, to achieve bettre portability...
ultrabook's size will range from 10"~13", while tablets will range frorm 7"~11", I guess. The only reason for a netbook will be much lower price than notebooks and indispensableness of physical keyboard. I do not see any circumstance when I would choose a netbook instead of a stylish tablet or a powerful and also-stylish ultrabook with a price less than 1000.Next gen Atom CPUs (late 2012, I think) will run extremely cool, according to Intel. They'll also be clocked higher than current gen ones and require less power.

If this leads to a netbook that's as slim as an "ultrabook" but smaller, which offers all-day battery life and runs completely silent thanks to being fanless, I might consider one, especially since I can get my current netbook + lightweight Linux distro + tiler to be more responsive than some people's core i7 + Windows setups with little difficulty.

As long as they're cheap, that is. I still rate netbooks above tablets. I can actually get work done on a netbook.

rg4w
September 7th, 2011, 02:50 PM
PC manufacturers race form form factor to form factor, always looking for some way to make acceptable margins but not finding them, never recognizing that the race-to-the-bottom they're engaged in is because they're all selling the same experience: Microsoft Windows.

If they want to differentiate, they might consider Ubuntu. :)

Lucradia
September 7th, 2011, 03:50 PM
"post-pc era"

When did that begin?

el_koraco
September 7th, 2011, 03:53 PM
When Steve Jobs did the first iPad presentation.

LMP900
September 7th, 2011, 04:13 PM
When did that begin?

The moment Steve Jobs announced it. ;)

I see this as one of Intel's desperate efforts to hold off ARM. Reports indicate that (ARM-based) tablets are eating into (Intel-based) netbook sales. Windows 8 will support ARM. Even Apple has threatened to switch if Intel can't lower energy-consumption. Without this Ultrabook campaign, they probably fear that people will flock to ARM-based Windows 8 tablets for their ultraportable needs.

I hope this campaign is a success. I've played with a MacBook Air for a lengthy period of time. It's an amazing machine. These types of computers blow netbooks out of the water (as they should, being priced over 3x as much). I want my 11.6" Ubuntu "Air."

Lucradia
September 7th, 2011, 05:11 PM
I hope this campaign is a success. I've played with a MacBook Air for a lengthy period of time. It's an amazing machine. These types of computers blow netbooks out of the water (as they should, being priced over 3x as much). I want my 11.6" Ubuntu "Air."

Intel needs to be cheaper and not buying up security companies so they can allow ISPs to shut down computers remotely in case they think your computer is a hacker, infected, a worm, etc. and stop messing around with threads, and start putting more higher base GHz on gaming laptops rather than relying on this turbo junk they're marketing before they gain my vote. This is why I'm stuck on AMD.

Oxwivi
September 7th, 2011, 05:55 PM
I personally wish Intel success. I'm not enticed with the ARM mess, and would love a ultra-low powered systems. The 3D transistor stuff look promising. I like x86, it's not gonna die any time soon, and wish it the best.

Cracklepop
September 8th, 2011, 08:00 AM
IMEMHO: Mature UltraBooks(I'm loving this term, lol...), will be powered by standard-voltage mainstream CPU soon, not ULV/LV or even mobile phone chips as in Netbooks. Netbook is in history already, as I feel. There is just no niche for it. Definitely it will be replaced by tablets and ultrabooks. In fact, netbook was just a compromsie based on notebook, to achieve bettre portability...
ultrabook's size will range from 10"~13", while tablets will range frorm 7"~11", I guess. The only reason for a netbook will be much lower price than notebooks and indispensableness of physical keyboard. I do not see any circumstance when I would choose a netbook instead of a stylish tablet or a powerful and also-stylish ultrabook with a price less than 1000.

No, "ultrabooks" won't use mainstream cpus because apparently a notebook has to be very thin to be an "ultrabook", and so the resulting 5 minute battery life just isn't going to cut it.

There is a niche for netbooks, clearly defined by you yourself here: ultraportable (7"<x<10") with a physical keyboard. Previously netbooks also filled the ultrportable niche regardless of keyboard, but of course keyboardless computing is going to tablets. There isn't anything else with a keyboard and the size of a netbook (if there was we'd call it a netbook!) so they aren't going to disappear.

You may personally have no use for a netbook, but there are many who want the extra portability that 13" doesn't have, and tablet are great for consumption, but not nearly so good for creation, thanks to lack of keyboard (although I personally am considering a Lenoo Thinkpad Tablet [the new, actual tablet] with it's dedicated active pen).

Cracklepop
September 8th, 2011, 08:05 AM
I personally wish Intel success. I'm not enticed with the ARM mess, and would love a ultra-low powered systems. The 3D transistor stuff look promising. I like x86, it's not gonna die any time soon, and wish it the best.

Mess? How is it a mess? What do you think about x86 nightmare-inducing backwards compatibility issues?

If you'd love an ultra-low powered system then you could have one now, if you weren't so against ARM for no apparent reason...

Copper Bezel
September 8th, 2011, 08:07 AM
You may personally have no use for a netbook, but there are many who want the extra portability that 13" doesn't have, and tablet are great for consumption, but not nearly so good for creation, thanks to lack of keyboard (although I personally am considering a Lenoo Thinkpad Tablet [the new, actual tablet] with it's dedicated active pen).

Yeah, it's easy to forget that your expectations from and interactions with your computer just aren't necessarily parallel to other people's.


There isn't anything else with a keyboard and the size of a netbook (if there was we'd call it a netbook!)
Weirdly enough, some have tried calling them (that is, tablets with keyboards attached and no touch) "smartbooks." Oy.


Of course they do, the trick to getting legions of parrots screaming "post-pc era" to buy a netbook is to call it "ultrabook".
Fair point. Damn, I hate marketing. And before anyone says it, I've loved the idea of the netbook form factor since well before they were generally available.

Oxwivi
September 8th, 2011, 08:52 AM
Mess? How is it a mess? What do you think about x86 nightmare-inducing backwards compatibility issues?

If you'd love an ultra-low powered system then you could have one now, if you weren't so against ARM for no apparent reason...
What mess you ask? Just Google 'linux arm mess', and you'll know more than enough. I don't know about x86 backwards-compatibility issues, but ARM CPUs are so diverse and nonstandard that programs compiled for one ARM device won't work on another. Yes, I as well love the low-powered aspect of ARM, but with it at such a state, it's never going to enter PC market. From Apple to the tiniest Chinese manufacturer, all using their own unique ARM specification...

sanz
September 8th, 2011, 09:17 AM
No, "ultrabooks" won't use mainstream cpus because apparently a notebook has to be very thin to be an "ultrabook", and so the resulting 5 minute battery life just isn't going to cut it.
Well, maybe I got the wrong memory. But anyway, Ultrabooks' cpu will be very powerful.



There is a niche for netbooks, clearly defined by you yourself here: ultraportable (7"<x<10") with a physical keyboard.
Now I'd call them ultrabook, with much more powerful chips.



You may personally have no use for a netbook, but there are many who want the extra portability that 13" doesn't have, and tablet are great for consumption, but not nearly so good for creation, thanks to lack of keyboard (although I personally am considering a Lenoo Thinkpad Tablet [the new, actual tablet] with it's dedicated active pen).

Basically, I regard "netbook" as some big mobile/tablet with keyboards, with which we can do very basic jobs. And your idea is some computer with smaller size. That's the difference.
Now I understand your situation, most of your jobs will be something like web-browsing or word-processing, and definitely you do not like big computer games. Then, I would recommend you a fancy tablet with USB keyboard. It's said that soon usb keybords will be very flexible or even foldable. Trust me, that won't cost much more than your netbook.:P

rg4w
September 8th, 2011, 03:54 PM
When Steve Jobs did the first iPad presentation.
How many apps running on an iPad were written on an iPad? ;)

Heck, how can you even use an iPad without first plugging into what Steve calls a "truck"?

"Post-PC" indeed. Never ceases to amaze be how powerful the RDF can be....

zekopeko
September 8th, 2011, 04:37 PM
How many apps running on an iPad were written on an iPad? ;)

Writing apps is a rather specialized activity. Just as trucks are specialized vehicles.


Heck, how can you even use an iPad without first plugging into what Steve calls a "truck"?

iOS 5 is going to be computer-free. No need to plug it into a computer.


"Post-PC" indeed. Never ceases to amaze be how powerful the RDF can be....

So yes we are in a post-PC era.

Oxwivi
September 8th, 2011, 05:09 PM
To replace the PC iOS needs to be a PC. The term post-PC is wrong.

Lucradia
September 9th, 2011, 02:26 PM
To replace the PC iOS needs to be a PC. The term post-PC is wrong.

No, it just needs to be able to run flash and windows apps. That's all.

Oxwivi
September 9th, 2011, 02:44 PM
That is basically a PC, is it not?

BeRoot ReBoot
September 9th, 2011, 02:48 PM
The PC is not "replaced" until the device replacing it is self-hosted. By then, it is essentially a PC again, so the whole "post-PC" bruhaha by the jobsian cult is complete nonsense. The only way tablets and smartphones can gain even wider acceptance is by becoming more like PCs and by being able to do more, not by distancing themselves from PCs and locking down.

Oxwivi
September 9th, 2011, 02:59 PM
The PC is not "replaced" until the device replacing it is self-hosted. By then, it is essentially a PC again, so the whole "post-PC" bruhaha by the jobsian cult is complete nonsense. The only way tablets and smartphones can gain even wider acceptance is by becoming more like PCs and by being able to do more, not by distancing themselves from PCs and locking down.
My point exactly.

Lucradia
September 9th, 2011, 03:13 PM
My point exactly.

At least it won't be Windows.

if you want post-Windows however support Wine / ReactOS.

Oxwivi
September 9th, 2011, 03:27 PM
Other than games, I see no reason to maintain Windows' API. And they could be ported with enough effort (thanks to cross-platform OpenGL).

But that besides the point. What we're saying is that post-PC is misleading.

Lucradia
September 9th, 2011, 03:32 PM
What we're saying is that post-PC is misleading.

Yes, yes it is.

Too bad C / C++ won't ever die though. Windows API is here to stay, and Game makers will continue to support it. Err wait, I meant JAVA, I think.

Python's better anyway.

Copper Bezel
September 9th, 2011, 06:15 PM
It's really not. C++ apps are a hell of a lot faster. Python is amazing for what it does, but it's an interpreted language, and that has limitations.

A lot of the same limitations in the .Net framework, really.

Lucradia
September 9th, 2011, 06:17 PM
A lot of the same limitations in the .Net framework, really.

Isn't .NET just an extension of some variation of C and Visual Basic?

Copper Bezel
September 9th, 2011, 06:19 PM
Yeah, but it's partly interpreted, which means requiring a framework for interpretation, doing jackall to protect proprietary code, and just the usual business of taking up extra cycles to redo work at runtime that should have been done in compiling.

shakabra
October 15th, 2011, 11:32 AM
So I have an Asus UX31 here. I'm trying to install ubuntu 11.10. I think I might be the first person in history to try this. I just got. It's really nice to type on BTW.

Anyhow, all I have with me right now is an sdcard. Apparently though, I can't boot from it. No option in the BIOS. The card is definately good. It boots on my other computer. The BIOS is from American Megatrends V204 REV 2119.I13ux3.008.

For now I may go the WUBI route until I can try with a USB thumb drive just to see what works and what doesn't under Linux.

Mars11
October 15th, 2011, 02:17 PM
So I have an Asus UX31 here. I'm trying to install ubuntu 11.10. I think I might be the first person in history to try this. I just got. It's really nice to type on BTW.

Anyhow, all I have with me right now is an sdcard. Apparently though, I can't boot from it. No option in the BIOS. The card is definately good. It boots on my other computer. The BIOS is from American Megatrends V204 REV 2119.I13ux3.008.

For now I may go the WUBI route until I can try with a USB thumb drive just to see what works and what doesn't under Linux.
I didn't even know that those were out yet...

WorBlux
October 15th, 2011, 05:49 PM
So I have an Asus UX31 here. I'm trying to install ubuntu 11.10. I think I might be the first person in history to try this. I just got. It's really nice to type on BTW.

Anyhow, all I have with me right now is an sdcard. Apparently though, I can't boot from it. No option in the BIOS. The card is definately good. It boots on my other computer. The BIOS is from American Megatrends V204 REV 2119.I13ux3.008.

For now I may go the WUBI route until I can try with a USB thumb drive just to see what works and what doesn't under Linux.

I for one am looking forward to any confirmation at to weather it works, especially the hotkeys, and what the output of sudo lshw is especially the wireless and sound chipsets. Bluetooth is atheros 3011 or 3012, yes?

LMP900
October 15th, 2011, 05:51 PM
So I have an Asus UX31 here. I'm trying to install ubuntu 11.10. I think I might be the first person in history to try this. I just got. It's really nice to type on BTW.

Anyhow, all I have with me right now is an sdcard. Apparently though, I can't boot from it. No option in the BIOS. The card is definately good. It boots on my other computer. The BIOS is from American Megatrends V204 REV 2119.I13ux3.008.

For now I may go the WUBI route until I can try with a USB thumb drive just to see what works and what doesn't under Linux.

I posted on G+ that I would keep a close watch on anything regarding Ubuntu on a Zenbook. This is certainly the first attempt I've seen. Good luck and please keep us updated.

Lucradia
October 15th, 2011, 07:53 PM
If your SD Card wasn't inserted before you started the computer, that might be the problem why it didn't show. Or, if the SD Card reader is integrated into the system... that also may be the problem (USB ones tend to get better reception?)

shakabra
October 15th, 2011, 09:46 PM
Well I got it working with WUBI.
[IMG]http://i51.tinypic.com/do6jhk.jpg
Trackpad isn't being recognized. The mouse functionality works but without any scroll. Everything else seems to be working fine. I'm going to keep trying t get a full install. I am going to go pick up a usb stick later and try booting from that.

shakabra
October 15th, 2011, 09:56 PM
Here's a screenshot. Anyone have any tips? Any developers out there with experience getting this sort of thing running?

http://i55.tinypic.com/2rrl4t2.png

Lucradia
October 15th, 2011, 10:00 PM
Here's a screenshot. Anyone have any tips? Any developers out there with experience getting this sort of thing running?

http://i55.tinypic.com/2rrl4t2.png

need a bigger picture. Just link it next time if you think it's going to be too large. We can't see the output.

shakabra
October 15th, 2011, 10:05 PM
http://i55.tinypic.com/29m1yqd.png
Here ya go.

shakabra
October 15th, 2011, 10:29 PM
Here's a look at my input devices.

http://i52.tinypic.com/2f0abz8.png

Any ideas?

Lucradia
October 15th, 2011, 10:37 PM
Here's a look at my input devices.

http://i52.tinypic.com/2f0abz8.png

Any ideas?

i8042 I believe is the keyboard chipset, since intel has a chipset number for that. Serio4 (Serial I/O 4?) and input6 troubles me.

shakabra
October 15th, 2011, 10:48 PM
i8042 I believe is the keyboard chipset, since intel has a chipset number for that. Serio4 (Serial I/O 4?) and input6 troubles me.
Troubles you why?