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kevin11951
December 30th, 2010, 06:12 AM
Lets say you were going to train ten people in a small business to use a new webmail interface (Zimbra for those who know about it).

How much do you charge?

Remember this is a small business, and they look to me to SAVE them money...

Edit: People I ask locally are giving me numbers that range from $100's to millions!

Bucky Ball
December 30th, 2010, 06:20 AM
Work it out by the hour. Standard rate would be around $60 (Australian), and that's doing them a favour. Generally you would charge more for such a large group.

MisterGaribaldi
December 30th, 2010, 06:47 AM
My off-hand guess would be anything from $60-$100 per person per class. Remember that you are using this to derive an income, and your time is worth something. Moreover, you have to put food on the table and keep a roof over your head, pay taxes, etc.

Dragonbite
December 30th, 2010, 05:48 PM
Figure out how long it will take to go over the material (hour blocks), apply a price ($60 would have been my guess) per person and give them a flat rate.

So if it will take 1 hour x $60 x 10 students = $600.
If it may take 2 hours to go over it, then $1,200... and so on.

The key is to know how long it will take, and what material do you need?

Don't forget to charge for hand-outs. Determine how much it would cost to print/produce it and then either have a ($5 x 10 copies = ) $50 material fees (on top of the $600 teaching fee) for all 10 or charge them $55 (for you) + $5 (material) = $60 per student.

Don't be shy to expense each and every item you do; setup, materials, follow-ups, travel, break-down, etc.

tweakedenigma
December 30th, 2010, 05:54 PM
I haven't done this kind of training in a while, but I would probably say 50-60 per hour as others have suggested, or possibly a flat rate that works out to roughly the same.

It might be worth looking into what your competitors are charging as well.

Dragonbite is right on the money as well with the extras.

3Miro
December 30th, 2010, 06:24 PM
It might be worth looking into what your competitors are charging as well.


Charge less so that you would be a "good deal", but also don't charge too low. If you charge too low, then you either not going to make a fair amount of money and/or they may decide that you are "too good to be true" and not take you seriously.

Dragonbite
December 30th, 2010, 06:38 PM
Charge less so that you would be a "good deal", but also don't charge too low. If you charge too low, then you either not going to make a fair amount of money and/or they may decide that you are "too good to be true" and not take you seriously.

It will crop up the question "why are they so much cheaper? What's wrong with him/her/it?"

And if you are the only one in the area that can teach that subject (adequately) then up the price some before the competitors come into the market.