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View Full Version : What's the screen refresh rate of most new PCs?



brawnypandora0
December 27th, 2010, 07:35 AM
My AGP video card is eight years old and I'm still using a CRT monitor. I know that computers are now all PCIe with LCD screen, so what's the typical screen refresh rate?

NightwishFan
December 27th, 2010, 07:41 AM
Something like 60hz for most LCDs I have used, though I believe it is display adaptor, device, and resolution specific.

Lucradia
December 27th, 2010, 08:19 AM
The "typical" range of refresh rates is between 20 and 120 Hz, but, due to how resolutions fit into certain monitors, only a few are actually used: 49, 50, 60, 70, 75 and 79.

You may not have heard of the Hz spectrum so high before, but it's possible for DTV Signals to reach up to 120 Hz at 1080p/i on a 42 inch television.

The most common Hz is 60 among computer monitors, however. Switching to a different Hz will cause the picture to fit differently on certain monitors, even though it's the same resolution.

Heck, with my nvidia GTX card, I can make ubuntu display 40 x 100 px on a 22 inch widescreen display.

nikhilbhardwaj
December 27th, 2010, 01:42 PM
my crt had a refresh rate of 85hz
the laptop monitor has a refresh rate of 60hz as does my new lcd monitor

jerenept
December 27th, 2010, 01:52 PM
my crt had a refresh rate of 85hz
the laptop monitor has a refresh rate of 60hz as does my new lcd monitor

LCD's tend to need a slower refresh rate, for less flickering... @60 Hz, my CRT causes splitting headaches, but the LCD seems fine. I think it has to do with the physical capabilities of the liquid crystals.

grahammechanical
December 27th, 2010, 02:01 PM
I do not think that we should be comparing refresh rates for CRT monitors with refresh rates for LCD or LED screens. They are not compatible. They work on different principles. The image on a CRT screen has to be refreshed because the image will fade over time. The screen has a coating that glows when hit by an electron beam. The electron gun scans the screen surface causing it to glow. If the refresh rate of this scan is too low noticeable flickering occurs.

LEDs are switched on or off. A completely different way of putting an image on the screen. So the refresh rate serves a different purpose. It is not the LEDs being refreshed so much as the image. This is especially true when watching television or DVDs where the image is rapidly changing. The issue with LEDs is that the image tends to persist. so, each individual LED needs to be able to switch on and off very quickly.

Regards

jerenept
December 27th, 2010, 02:07 PM
I do not think that we should be comparing refresh rates for CRT monitors with refresh rates for LCD or LED screens. They are not compatible. They work on different principles. The image on a CRT screen has to be refreshed because the image will fade over time. The screen has a coating that glows when hit by an electron beam. The electron gun scans the screen surface causing it to glow. If the refresh rate of this scan is too low noticeable flickering occurs.

LEDs are switched on or off. A completely different way of putting an image on the screen. So the refresh rate serves a different purpose. It is not the LEDs being refreshed so much as the image. This is especially true when watching television or DVDs where the image is rapidly changing. The issue with LEDs is that the image tends to persist. so, each individual LED needs to be able to switch on and off very quickly.

Regards

This is why, IMO CRT's are superior to Flatscreens. (Now, if it was a little smaller and lighter.... oh wait, Plasma screen displays :P )

cascade9
December 27th, 2010, 02:17 PM
I do not think that we should be comparing refresh rates for CRT monitors with refresh rates for LCD or LED screens. They are not compatible. They work on different principles. The image on a CRT screen has to be refreshed because the image will fade over time. The screen has a coating that glows when hit by an electron beam. The electron gun scans the screen surface causing it to glow. If the refresh rate of this scan is too low noticeable flickering occurs.

LEDs are switched on or off. A completely different way of putting an image on the screen. So the refresh rate serves a different purpose. It is not the LEDs being refreshed so much as the image. This is especially true when watching television or DVDs where the image is rapidly changing. The issue with LEDs is that the image tends to persist. so, each individual LED needs to be able to switch on and off very quickly.


+1. 60Hz on a CRT, nasty. 60Hz on LCD, not painful at all.


This is why, IMO CRT's are superior to Flatscreens. (Now, if it was a little smaller and lighter.... oh wait, Plasma screen displays :P )

Beacuse of the way that the image refreshes? *blinks* Odd.

I'm not a huge fan of LCDs/plasmas, I've only just switched to a LCD this year (mainly because my beloved 17'' flatscreen CRT got a some horrid scratches on the surface in my last move) but I've never had a problem with that.

CRTs in general had better colour contol (vividness in particular), contrast, and blacker blacks. That is slowly changing.